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pvd said:
I'm moving to a new studio/workshop for my personal stuff with a couple others in Hunters Point in SF. Cool place. Accross the street is J.P. Morgan. An SF legend. He gave us a tour of his shop. The star of the show was this Rickman Honda chassis. Crazy fillets. OMFG!

https://www.flickr.com/photos/pvdwiki/sets/72157623652541408/
If those are fillet brazes, I am not impressed. They look "cold."

Do you really think this:


Is as good as or better than this?


Even as welds they are clunky.
 

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Pete,

Could you elaborate a bit....Is that a nickel plated MC frame. I notice you take wonderful detail pictures but one of the whole MC frame to give us an overall idea would be nice.

I have a feeling but have not confirmed that many of these ol timers that "bronze welded" mc frames used a spec of rod that is somewhat different than today. Maybe higher in Cu content or something but it is a bit difficult to get that kind of bead with Low fuming bronze of typical designations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
shiggy said:
If those are fillet brazes, I am not impressed.
Those fillets were probably laid down in less than 5 minutes per joint including prep. Old school english brazing is really sick. I'm far more impressed by the joints on the Rickman over the 'bicycle' brazes you posted. The Rickman is the real deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
dbohemian said:
Is that a nickel plated MC frame..
I belive so, or it's a similar coating.


dbohemian said:
I notice you take wonderful detail pictures but one of the whole MC frame to give us an overall idea would be nice.
Yeah, I rarely take whole bike or frame pics because it's so hard to do without a proper backdrop. I tend to focus on details. The chassis looks similar to most cradle frames.

dbohemian said:
I have a feeling but have not confirmed that many of these ol timers that "bronze welded" mc frames used a spec of rod that is somewhat different than today. Maybe higher in Cu content or something but it is a bit difficult to get that kind of bead with Low fuming bronze of typical designations.
It could be, but you have to admit that those joints took some serious skill. I'm sure they were using flux and rod that would be illegal to sell these days.
 

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Curtis bikes has some very unique fillets... stunning. At one point they had some moto frame pics up as well.


-Schmitty-
 

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pvd said:
Those fillets were probably laid down in less than 5 minutes per joint including prep. Old school english brazing is really sick. I'm far more impressed by the joints on the Rickman over the 'bicycle' brazes you posted. The Rickman is the real deal.
*yawn*
 

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Brompton Fillets

One of the most impressive things I saw at NAHBS was the fillets on the Brompton folders. They had a video going of the brazer and he worked hot and fast! Brazed in the jig that was mounted on something that allowed ball-in-socket type movement.

-Joel

Bicycle accessory Metal Close-up Material property Steel
 

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Clockwork Bikes said:
One of the most impressive things I saw at NAHBS was the fillets on the Brompton folders. They had a video going of the brazer and he worked hot and fast! Brazed in the jig that was mounted on something that allowed ball-in-socket type movement.

-Joel
bromptons are fantastic bikes. i worked at one of the top US brommie dealers for many years. a really great company to work with.
 

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Vlad said:
It's true, PVD. I have never welded or brazed or mitered anything. I did, however, make a nice clock in high school woodshop.
Just as well, or you would never understand the concept of time, or even what a clock was.
 

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i remember that guy. He used to build some cool full-sus frames back in the stone ages. if i did those i would give myself a D. *if* they are brass fillets. to me they look like wire feed Aluminum beads {i worked many, many hours in an Al. fab shop....} esp. the start/stop puddle. if they are brass fillets they are WAY too cold - the edges are too sharp & create a stress riser right in the HAZ. as someone said, check out Curtis bikes. that's how you do it. I think the UK moto builders {from what i have seen} do a few things to achive the "stack o' dimes" look: no paste flux, gas fluxer only, and, use big rod - likely 1/8". this way you can dump enough filler into a puddle to create a "dam" for the next big "dime". try it out - with thick tubing it's a breeze. - Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
 
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