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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not quite sure how to attack some obsticals now that I have a longer suspension bike. Techy sections that I used to be careful on while descending for instance... Is there some different way to ride techy sections with an AM bike vs a short travel XC? For example, I rode some technical sections where there were steep stair step type rocks spaced apart just enough so that the front and back tires fall at the same rate.

Is this kind of riding best served by just bombing through it or should I ride as I normally did before?
 

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hmmm technical/steep sections? Stay off the brakes as long as you can, that's the only tip I can give, but it doesn't depend on suspension... hmm you can go faster through technical sections with more suspension :)
 

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Bad Case of the Mondays
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There is only one way to ride stuff....Upright.

I say whatever method you use for getting through stuff is correct. I found I had to adjust my climbing style between a hardtail and a dual squish, but descending just meant traveling faster and taking the fun line instead of the smooth line.
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jdub said:
There is only one way to ride stuff....Upright.

I say whatever method you use for getting through stuff is correct. I found I had to adjust my climbing style between a hardtail and a dual squish, but descending just meant traveling faster and taking the fun line instead of the smooth line.
I think I am not allowing for the benefits of the extra squish. My loss of skin is the result of that too. I think I need to learn to trust that the bike is going to absorb a lot more than I am giving credit for. I also have it setup with a more XCish feel with about 16-18% sag. I may need to take it out a bit and let the squish be more noticable.
 

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Who is John Galt?
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iviguy said:
I think I am not allowing for the benefits of the extra squish. My loss of skin is the result of that too. I think I need to learn to trust that the bike is going to absorb a lot more than I am giving credit for. I also have it setup with a more XCish feel with about 16-18% sag. I may need to take it out a bit and let the squish be more noticable.
I can tell you one thing, and I bet others will agree, you will get hurt more often riding slow through technical sections than riding fast. In fact I can say that every crash I have had happened when I was being too cautious. Momentum is your friend (within reason). Recently I was talking with a freeride dude on the infamous Chubb Trail steps near St. Louis. While we were talking a rider and his girlfriend, each outfitted with new Specialized S-Works Epics and all the latest gear, rode up. The guy had to impress his gal by riding the steps. We all knew what was coming. He hit his brakes in the worst spot and did an endo on that new $5,000 bike, failing to impress her...
 

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Did the carbon fiber crack?
:D

These are two pix of sections of trails I crashed on over the weekend...




The reason I crashed was cuz of the following....
1) My balls weren't big enough.
2) I didn't have the technical skills.
3) I was going way too damn slow.

One thing I keep learning about the 575 (and this probably applies to alot of other FS AM bikes out there) is that it can do alot more than what I'm willing to let it do. Hence why I either tend to walk or ride SLOWLY through rough terrain. I THINK that if I let 'er rip and let the suspension do alot of the work, I'll get through a rough spot unscathed. Maybe my ass will be puckered, but that's alot better than a slow speed crash.
 

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EDR
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get your ass back behind the seat and your chest low....i mean low, like almost level with the bars, or at least what feels like level with the bars. Let the bike drop off the steps naturally but try to keep your upper body independant of the bike.

If you think a stair step is steep try this. Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep and you will see how far the bike is from actually being able to flip. In most cases I have found it's rediculousy far from being in any danger. The problem is we keep our bodies far far too upright and then wham! Superman! I'm no expert, just giving my .02 cents :D

-as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom ;)
 

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can't resist:
the best way to ride a yeti is with velcro gloves so you can keep hold of their fur!

Sorry, I'm delerious from withdrawl from riding my 575 due to studying for medical boards. One more week and then I can get my yeti back on the trail where it deserves to be.
 

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local trails rider
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A couple of pieces of advice I have heard on the trail, talking about rocky/rooty sections, on hardtails:

"Close your eyes and pedal harder!"
"Don't go around every stone. Find a line, go straight, just avoid the ones that look really threatening!"

I am not saying that I am any good, but just trying to adjust my riding in those directions (well, not closing my eyes) seems to improve my chances of clearing a section.
eatdrinkride said:
Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep....

as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom
"Rolling" the bike has helped me at a few places where I had some doubts.

Any hints for going UP a couple of stairs that are close to bike length? Hit it fast and fly over it?
 

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perttime said:
Any hints for going UP a couple of stairs that are close to bike length? Hit it fast and fly over it?
Approach at low gear and fast and keep the momentum pedaling. Move your weight forward when front wheel clears the top step.
 

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local trails rider
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GreenBonty said:
Approach at low gear and fast and keep the momentum pedaling. Move your weight forward when front wheel clears the top step.
Should I lift the front or allow the first step to kick it high?
 

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Momentum is crucial

perttime said:
Should I lift the front or allow the first step to kick it high?
Yes, you raise your nose so you don't just bump into the first step and get bounced back. If you over do it however, you loose momentum as well. Don't forget to keep the cranks working for you.:thumbsup:
 

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Hi Ivyguy,
Let some air out of that shock!
For XC you should have about 25% or half an inch of sag - it will be much better through the rough descents cos once a few hits get you into about 50% of the travel it will be super plush at soaking up the bumps and you will be able to rip faster with more control.
Remember if you are not pedaling....you are not going fast enough!
Trust the beast.
Chaser
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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2,365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
eatdrinkride said:
get your ass back behind the seat and your chest low....i mean low, like almost level with the bars, or at least what feels like level with the bars. Let the bike drop off the steps naturally but try to keep your upper body independant of the bike.

If you think a stair step is steep try this. Get off your bike and stand next to it. "Roll" the bike down the stairstep and you will see how far the bike is from actually being able to flip. In most cases I have found it's rediculousy far from being in any danger. The problem is we keep our bodies far far too upright and then wham! Superman! I'm no expert, just giving my .02 cents :D

-as far as hitting stair steps where the tires want to roll both rear and front at the same time.... Hold on and pray, open your eyes at the bottom ;)
I am sure I was not far enough back. Moving slow on a steep techy section but staying more upright is not the right way to do things... apparently.... :madman:
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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2,365 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Chaser said:
Hi Ivyguy,
Let some air out of that shock!
For XC you should have about 25% or half an inch of sag - it will be much better through the rough descents cos once a few hits get you into about 50% of the travel it will be super plush at soaking up the bumps and you will be able to rip faster with more control.
Remember if you are not pedaling....you are not going fast enough!
Trust the beast.
Chaser
Yeah, I think you are right. I have noticed that it's not swallowing the bumps like it should. Just me trying to merge that XC feel with an AM bike I guess. Now if I can just manage to keep air in my tires I should have a good weekend. I think I am going to change my name to "Flats Domino". Seriously, I have had more flats lately. I have gone through 2 tubes and about 9 or 10 patches since I got this new bike. And that is with slime tubes! Some of the holes are on the rim side.... hmmm. :skep:
 

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antonio said:
nice! a 575 in it's natural environment.

Ant
(I would've worn padding)
I would have walked! J/k

Iviguy,

My 2 cents.
Before the descent, lower your saddle all the way down. This helps getting your butt over the rear tire.
 

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In my mind, I can do it!
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
AZmtncycler said:
weight back and good balance. Having a fork that doesn't have too much brake dive is a good thing as well.:thumbsup:
where's the video??
 
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