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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Both collet axles are removed regular to service the shock and SI. With aluminum, it strips easily and can seize. There isn't enough purchase to really get a hex in there securely. I don't understand why can't these be titanium.

The specified torque for the collet axles are 13NM and 14Nm which is pretty high for a piece made out of aluminum.

The main axle connects the rear triangle to the SI bearings which I can see why high torque is needed but the smaller one just attaches the shock eyelet to the extender arms. There are no bearings here. I'm guessing it should be tight enough to remove all play and torque the wedge bolt to spec to hold it in place.

The question is, do these really need to be such high torque values? They are used to join two pieces together. I like the stainless barrel they use to connect the shock to the frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Any tips on preventing wear and tear on these aluminum pieces? They deform everytime you torque aluminum in either direction. Eventually it rounds out. I think the bigger collet is large enough to get a good seat with a good set of allen keys however the smaller one in the shock eyelet is at an awkward angle and doesn't give a lot of area to fully seat a hex bit that well. I'm using bondhus and wera hex wrenches. I've just purchased a new set of socket bits for my torque wrench to to make sure I have a nice tight fit.
 

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Any tips on preventing wear and tear on these aluminum pieces? They deform everytime you torque aluminum in either direction. Eventually it rounds out. I think the bigger collet is large enough to get a good seat with a good set of allen keys however the smaller one in the shock eyelet is at an awkward angle and doesn't give a lot of area to fully seat a hex bit that well. I'm using bondhus and wera hex wrenches. I've just purchased a new set of socket bits for my torque wrench to to make sure I have a nice tight fit.
Not sure why you're so worried about the published torque specs and the 'wear and tear' that isn't likely to happen unless you're heavy handed. Apply grease to non threaded parts so they slide in and out easily and don't seize in place. And thread lock to threads. Use a decent torque wrench.

I've disassembled my SB130 over a dozen times in 2 years now and the only damage to these alloy fasteners is that the finish rubbing off from tools being inserted and removed.

By the way, the collet expander bolt(the small cone-shaped bolts that goes in to the main axle and shock extender) is steel, not alloy. It's encompassed with an alloy cone. The threaded bolt in that cone is steel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes the wedge is steel, no issues with that.
I was only asking because I can see my collet axle starting to round out. I've ordered a new one to replace it.
Was just trying to get info from those who has more experience with these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks. Bought some Lexivon hex bits, Neiko adaptors. Already have wera hex wrenches. Throwing away the husky crap I got at home depot.
I can tell it's a better fit and I can insert it a little deeper. Who doesn't like it deeper?
 
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