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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I asked this over at "Brake Time" but of course not responses.

I have XTR Disk Brakes on my new flux and while I know how to adjust how far the lever is from the handlebars I'm not quite sure how to adjust how soon the lever engages the rotor. I have rather small hands and would like the lever to engage the rotor as soon as I pull. Right now it engages about half way to the handlebar BTW, The levers don't feel spongy or anything so I think they did a good bleed.

Thanks in advance
 

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Lay off the Levers
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AFAIK there is no engagement adjustments of any kind. There's no meaninful return spring adjustment either.

The calipers are self centering so as the pads wear, the pistons return stop increases to a proprotional point farther out. Thus the pad's distance from the rotors is fairly constant regardless of how thick they are, or how much they wear.

You can push the pistons back in but they will return to their previous extended distance with the very next grab or two. The pad seperator spring is only a retainer to keep the pads from jiggiling about. It does not have sufficient strength to push the pads further out or the pistons back in.

Long story short...the only adjustment is the reach. If you want quicker engagement, the best you can do is set the reach as close to the bar as comfortable/possible. The Reach adjustment is really designed for adjustments to hand size, the calipers engage about as quickly as possible...

A lot of people would actually like the engagement set further out since the XTR/XR calipers tend to maintain a very slight drag.

Sorry, Cheers!
 

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Bad Case of the Mondays
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On my XTR, the only way I could get the lever to engage quickly was to do a very thorough bleed. If I took my time and really got the bleed air free (which you should do anyway), then the engagement was very quick.
 

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Lay off the Levers
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I meant to add that as well. Since the pads sit practically on the rotors anyway (usually a slight drag). If the levers are hitting the bars before full firm engagement, you may still have air trapped in the hoses and/or calipers. If you are doing the bleeding yourself, make sure the resivoirs are level, fill and pump them several times (while controlling the bleed at the caliper). I run through quite a lot of fluid at sometimes just to make certain, but I always use a clean catch tube and bag, so I usually just pour the bleed back into the bottle when I'm done. (This may be a no-no, but it works for me)

If you haven't done this already, there is also another move you should do when finishing up the bleed process: After the initial bleed, close the bleed valve and pump and hold the handle. Then rapidly open and close the bleed valve, a tiny bit (While still holding the lever firmly). Do this a few times. This can help purge some of the bubbles by force. Remember to refill the resivoir when done and close it. There is a better description of this in the $himano brake manual.

Hope it works out.
 

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cask conditioned
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I've found that moving the levers changes the point of engagement but there's a way to change that too that sometimes works for me. Put the levers where they're most comfortable for your reach for shifting and braking. Then pull the pads out and push the pistons in. It'll take quite a few pumps of the levers to reset everything once your pads are back and wheel is on, but the engagement will seem better for where your levers are now. If that doesn't feel right, change the reach to a little longer, pull the pads and reset the pistons, put everything back and squeeze the lever, then adjust your reach in a bit. Maybe this is just a temporary adjustment but it seems to work for me, at least psychologically. :)
 
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