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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Phoenix and ride on very dry, hard-packed single track (usually with a loose layer of sand/dust on top). It seems that every time I get out of the saddle on a climb and take my weight off the back tire it breaks loose on every pedal stroke. I'm looking for something that isn't crazy expensive. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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mwcet8k said:
I live in Phoenix and ride on very dry, hard-packed single track (usually with a loose layer of sand/dust on top). It seems that every time I get out of the saddle on a climb and take my weight off the back tire it breaks loose on every pedal stroke. I'm looking for something that isn't crazy expensive. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
"...every time I get out of the saddle on a climb and take my weight off the back tire it breaks loose..."

I see this as the key and the answer is simple - Do not take your weight off the rear wheel.

I am not kidding. Technique is as or more important than the tire.

What tire(s) are you using now?
 

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Cinders

get some Cinder 2.25's. Superho has em on sale now for 30 bones. They are kinda heavy, but work great for SoMo, Hawes, MMP. They stick like glue in the sandy turns, hold in the rocky descents, and grab well when climbing. If they don't hold, sit back down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm currently running WTB Moto Raptor 2.1's, front and back. I'm wondering if I should just go a little fatter? And yes, I agree about staying back. I've ordered a new seat post that will allow me to sit a bit higher, which should help.

I'll take a look at those Panaracers. Thanks.
 

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mwcet8k said:
I'm currently running WTB Moto Raptor 2.1's, front and back. I'm wondering if I should just go a little fatter? And yes, I agree about staying back. I've ordered a new seat post that will allow me to sit a bit higher, which should help.

I'll take a look at those Panaracers. Thanks.
I ride in similar desert conditons. The Hutch Spider works GREAT! :D

If you scroll down a bit you can read my LONG review of desert riding it. ;)

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=91942
 

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Also in Phoenix and . . .

the panaracer fire XC Pro in 2.1 is a reasonable tire on the slippery stuff, but not as good on the rocks (but these can be purchased for very cheap, like less than $20 each)

The Cinders are "blockie," run small for there size and feel "squremie" or they tend to "wiggle" around on slickrock portions of the trail. Also I don't think they corner as well as they could or should (the square edge side knobs are big and "chunkie" and don't hold when you lean the bike over) Also the best deal you can find on the Cinders right now is like $30 per tire.

If you can find a deal on these, I highly recommend them . . . Kenda Nevagal ! I'm running a 2.5 in the front and a 2.35 out back. The Stick-E has very, very good grip (although they don't seem to be lasting as long as I would like) I can even get away with standing up to hammer some climbs (but that has more to do with a single pivot vs. an FSR bike for me) I got my tires at StupidGo for around $17 each (the lighter versions, not the DH versions) when they had one of these "tire sale" deals. I'm looking for another 2.35 to replace my rear soon, but I may run it into a "semi-slick" state waiting for prices on these "VERY POPULAR" tires to go down.
 

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DJBiker said:
the panaracer fire XC Pro in 2.1 is a reasonable tire on the slippery stuff, but not as good on the rocks (but these can be purchased for very cheap, like less than $20 each)
I ran these a bunch ( 3 or 4 sets)... they are not bad. I really didn't like them on the front...they hold pretty good but when they GO there's usually no warning... they are just GONE. I like a tire that gives some warning that it's about to let go...another thing I really like about the SPIDER. :cool:
 

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I ride in very dry and at times very sandy conditions in Western Australia.

I had similar problems climbing a couple of hills here, with the back tire breaking loose . I experimented with a number of tires and have found the Kenda Blue Groove (2.35 stickee) to be the best rear tire (even better a Kenda Nevegal 2.35 stickee) for my conditions.

Changing to clipless pedals also made a big improvement.
 

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I live in the desert as well. I climb granite and hard pack with a nice thin layer of either tiny rocks or sand and no matter what kind of tire my friends and I have used the absolute best method is to properly weight the rear tire. Sit and spin if you can. When I ride my SS, I have no choice but to stand, but I stand with as much weight as I can comfortably hang over the rear or middle of the bike. Its kind of awkward. Find a gear that you can stand up on the up hill in and use strong low torque perfect circle type pedaling its hell on your back and quads but it gets the job done. standing and hammering with "square" pedaling on the cranks won't cut it. I dig what shiggys saying. Save the money and keep your current tires, just work on technique. No matter how much money we throw at our bikes, no matter how much technology we have, it still all depends on the rider and his abilities.
 

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My Experiences with some of the tires mentioned...

I recently moved to Prescott AZ and ride a lot on phoenix-like trails (in addition to the pine forest duff trails here). My main goal in a tire is to maintain traction up steep, loose trails without adding too much rotational weight. I should note that, while I don't have many huckster skills, I am pretty good at maintaining that fragile balance of front/rear weighting. I agree with what others have said about working on technique, because it is the single biggest factor in making it up hard stuff, but once you are 95% skilled at slippy climbing, the next biggest factor is your rear tire. (followed by rear suspension, bar ends and frame geometry). With that in mind, here are my somewhat objective views of three tires I have tried here.

I started out with my east coast fave XC tire: the 2.1 Fire XC pro (127tpi). It performed ok, but on the loose stuff, its traction was a limiting factor.

Then I asked the locals what they ran. Wierwolf was the predominant tire of choice. I got a set of 2.1s, ran the rear reversed (this is key for climbing traction) and it was a noticable improvement. After 30+ rides in them, they are even better than new.

I have stans rims and am slowly prodding myself towards the goopy notubes thing. Unfortunately, WTB tires (i.e. my newly beloved weirwolfs) are a no go with Stans (if you follow their reccomend, which I will). So, after much searching, I bit the bullet and paid retail (!) for Kenda Nevegal and Blue Grooves. I am on a bus. trip so I don't remember which was front/back, but the rear one was the Stick-E tread. These tires were another step up from the Weirwolfs - though not as big a step as Fires to Weirwolfs. True to the name of their rubber, they stuck to everything. The big problem is that, after 10 rides (!!) they have worn so much that the traction is signifigantly reduced. Obviously, the Stick-E rubber was not designed with longevity in mind (they have a different tread for that), but 10 fricking rides? That is way too quick wearing for me. Yes, my ride has some pavement, but only about 1 mile. The Weirwolfs have been through 3x as much riding and are right at the sweet spot.

So where does this leave me? Well, I might try the longer lasting rubber versions of the BG/Nevegal if I can find 'em at a price less than retail. I am also looking at the Specialized Roll X pros. In the meantime, I am back to my Weirwolfs and wondering if this Stans thing is really worth dealing with the extremely limited tire choices...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey, thanks for all the feedback everyone. It's been really helpful. I had decided to stick w/ the Moto Raptors for the time being, until I noticed yesterday that several of the knobs are missing on the rear tire from my ride last weekend, leaving the casing exposed. So, time for new tires.

At this point, I'll probably either go with Weirwolfs or Spiders. The Nevagal sounds really nice, but I've read around on this forum and everyone complains that they wear quickly. The Weirwolfs wear really well. Haven't found a lot regarding how the Spiders wear??
 

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mwcet8k said:
Hey, thanks for all the feedback everyone. It's been really helpful. I had decided to stick w/ the Moto Raptors for the time being, until I noticed yesterday that several of the knobs are missing on the rear tire from my ride last weekend, leaving the casing exposed. So, time for new tires.

At this point, I'll probably either go with Weirwolfs or Spiders. The Nevagal sounds really nice, but I've read around on this forum and everyone complains that they wear quickly. The Weirwolfs wear really well. Haven't found a lot regarding how the Spiders wear??
I've got 200 miles on the set I have - haven't really noticed any wear. ( All XC miles in the desert)
 

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I have put 18 hours on a Blue Groove (6 hours front, 12 hours rear) and 12 hours on a Nevegal (6 hours front and rear). includes 4 miles road, 2 miles concrete dual use path, 12 miles hardpack and the rest (ie 16 hours) on soft sand, with limestone outcrops to play on.

It is difficult to spot any wear, tread pattern looks new.

Running at fairly low tire pressures 28psi front, 36psi rear if that makes a difference.
 

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nickobec said:
I have put 18 hours on a Blue Groove (6 hours front, 12 hours rear) and 12 hours on a Nevegal (6 hours front and rear). includes 4 miles road, 2 miles concrete dual use path, 12 miles hardpack and the rest (ie 16 hours) on soft sand, with limestone outcrops to play on.

It is difficult to spot any wear, tread pattern looks new.

Running at fairly low tire pressures 28psi front, 36psi rear if that makes a difference.
Th real question is the rubber compound - StickE or DTC?
 

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sodade said:
The real question is the rubber compound - StickE or DTC?
Sorry, forgot to mention StickEe.

Do not expect DTC to be available in Oz just yet. Though I look forward to getting a Blue Groove for the rear when they do arrive.

I think my tires were the the first shipment of Kenda's to make it to WA (Western Australia aka the Wait Awhile state).
 
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