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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The unabridged version....

If you slightly lift up the saddle of 575 and hear a knocking or looseness kinda noise, make sure all the suspension bolts are tight, your rear wheel's bearings are not loose and your saddle is tight on the seatpost. If the sound and sensation is still there, it's more than likely your shock's bushings.
Here is what it would sound like (turn up the volume):

I'm not including the steps to remove the shock from the bike and the dogbone as that was already covered on a different thread.

Step 1- Gather all the tools you will need. In this case, a bushing tool. This tool is made by mtbr member "mtnbiker4life" and he sells it in the classifieds along with bushings for different manufacturers. It is very well made and I highly recommended it to the DIY crowd! Also shown are the assorted tools needed to remove the shock from the Yeti and it's dogbone linkage.



Here is a picture of the old bushing prior to removal.


Step 2- Insert the Ejector Pin through the bushing and slide the bushing guide on the other side with the counter bore facing the shock so as to capture the bushing once it's pressed out by the pin.



I used a vise to press the bushing out out of the shock eyelet and into the counter bore.


The bushing presses out pretty easily using the vise.


Note that the bushing has been pressed out of the shock's eyelet and into the counterbore on the other side.


Step 3- Installing a new bushing
Clean the eyelet.


Lightly grease the pin


Put the new bushing on the pin


Lightly grease the bushing


Place the support foot (the end cap) into the counter bore of the bushing guide (the counter bore will not be directly against the shock during the bushing installation).


Make sure that the slit in the bushing is facing away from the shock body (or facing the back of the bike).


Put the tool into the vise and slowly press the new bushing in.


Halfway in


Done



Step 4- Put the shock back on the bike and torque all bolts to spec.

Test. No more bushing slop

Total time was 10 minutes to remove the shock and dog bone, 5 minutes to remove and install a new bushing and another 10 minutes to reinstall the dog bone and put the shock back on the bike....
 

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Haggis said:
Got the new black 12mm tool for Manitou shocks. A thing of beauty and a joy forever. Stop messing with sockets and get one.
Well I did order the 1/2" version, should be here any day, I will comment back once mine comes in as I need to change out the DU's on my Roco.

Just picked up an Manitou Evolver ISX-6, so I guess I will need the 12mm DU tool for that now or at least down the road when the DU's wear.

Cheers
J
 

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Amphibious Technologies
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3,472 Posts
Qman said:
why are you using grease on the bushing?
That isn't a good idea according to the folks at Romic and my LBS....
Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
 

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The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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SCUBAPRO said:
Agreed. I did that once and dirt got in the bushing and actually decreased life of bushing. Never again. I run them dry and they last much longer.
The manufacture of the bushings states these can be run dry or lubricated since the ones I sell have a small percentage of lead which increases lubricity. As stated our application is exposed to the elements so adding anything that will make dirt/sand stick to it would not be good.

During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing. In my years of testing these on bikes and in pumps here are a few things that can cause premature failure:

1. Incorrect installation by using the wrong tool
2. Incorrect placement of the slit
3. Incorrect installation of pivot/shock hardware

The only caution to be taken is not to apply to much since the bushing could shift inside the bore but since it's capture by the spacers it will not come out.

A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.
 

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"El Whatever"
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mtnbiker4life said:
A quote from Garlock Application Guide - Lubrication - Can be used totally dry, fully lubricated, or with intermittent lubrication and can be used in the presence of many industrial liquids.
Actually, the same type of bushing is used on our forks and we use lots of oil in them.
 

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Amphibious Technologies
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mtnbiker4life said:
During my testing I ran them lubricated and dry. It did not make a difference. I've even removed them and reinstalled them to do more testing.
No difference; so why not run them dry then?:confused:
 

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The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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SCUBAPRO said:
No difference; so why not run them dry then?:confused:
I am currently running them dry due to trail conditions.....dust and sand. Like many parameters in mtn bke set up......test, and document then run what works for your style of riding on the many different trails you ride. Their is no one set answer.....it's all about working within the manufactuers given/stated parameters.
 
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