Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had a busy couple of days at the shop. I still have some work to do, but it's getting really close. I'm skipping WWTP031 because we still have two WWTP030s and I'd like to leave that number open if there is a way to change the WWTP030 to WWTP031 in the future.

I got the seatstays done. Here they are all tacked up and ready to go (don't overthink the heat on the NDS in the middle just yet, it's coming up):



I was somewhat impressed with this section of weld. I'm starting to realize how to hold the torch, feed the rod, control the heat, and do it all at the same time. I'm still not great, but I feel as if I'm getting better. Now if I could learn to do all those things and breathe at the same time. I still have a tough time with that.





You may also remember that the TT was not welded to the HT because last time I'd really gotten to work on the frame, I'd brazed the TT/Sleeve sub-assembly that was already welded but never got the front welded as I hadn't been out to the shop. So here it is:





Now, I also thought I'd tack the binder on so that it would be easier to braze later. Instead, I welded that out too. So here are more pictures of the stays and the welded on binder. I shaped it a bit with files so that it will look similar to the internally routed hose guide:





This is a piece of the stainless hose guide and a piece of welding rod that I was testing something with:



And here it is on one of the scrap 4130 stays (you see where this is headed?):



And now it's tacked in the middle (so that's my proof of concept to myself):



So why I did that was to do this:






And that's where the heat came from in this picture:


So that I could hang the hose guide under the stays and have enough gap so that the hose doesn't clank on the frame. Now you're going to have to wait to see the rest until I have it done how I want it. It's not really started yet.

One thing to newbies that I learned on this and this is probably the only real valuable part of this post is that I took my bike stand with me to weld the stays. I probably should have taken pictures of how I was able to position the frame and get to those tight spots. I was so kicking myself for not realizing how useful it would be until the last two tubes went in that I didn't even think about it. Here is one though, and you can see that the frame is positioned all kinds of funny and I can still rest my torch hand on the clamp to get in from the top. Also, check out bending the wire to get it to feed in how I wanted to. I thought this would be helpful/useful to future builders:



This was certainly the most difficult section to get done though:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,598 Posts
good work - getting closer! When you are done - do you live somewhere where you can get out and go some good rides or are you in winter wonderland mode where you live?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
coconinocycles said:
right on - cool to see! So, i'm curious - after this adventure, what do you think of the idea of doing it for a living? Steve Garro, Coconino Cycles.
Steve,

I've often wondered how you guys do it (even prior to building this one). The math just doesn't work out when I do the figuring. Or to put it another way, I can't imagine trying to be a professional frame builder, supporting a family, and still being able to get out and ride, travel, etc. I'm sure there are guys doing it, but it's got to be a TON of work. I salute you guys for being able to do it. I certainly couldn't make a living doing this nor would I want to. Now as a hobby, it's a great time. I hope that the pros realize I'm not knocking your profession, rather complimenting you on being able to do it. I'm amazed you guys can do it.

MMcG said:
good work - getting closer! When you are done - do you live somewhere where you can get out and go some good rides or are you in winter wonderland mode where you live?
Well, I'm in the Dallas area and most of the trails here are wet and not ridable until they dry out. However, I think I've got the H1N1 so it's going to be a while before I get to ride anyway.

Evil4bc said:
belt drive ?

Were did you find the Spot / Gates dropout ?
I wanted the option to experiment with the belt drive. The idea was on #1, I could try it and see what I thought of it. It's no harder to put that dropout in there than any other dropout, so why not? However, if I don't like it, #2 doesn't have to have it and I won't end up with a goofy dropout. The folks at Spot are cool and willing to get them to you if they have them in stock. I do think they changed it though, so this style may be EOL'd.
 

·
Bike Dork
Joined
·
1,365 Posts
QBP isn't doing any beltdrive stuff anymore. They do have a couple rings and belts still around though, but you have to ask about them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,158 Posts
I personally like the design of the Spot / Gates dropout I built a sample frame for them a few years back with one of these on there and just really like the way it was all held together .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Does it matter that the seat post binder's faces are not parallel? How are you planing on clamping it shut?
I hope i am missing something here (dont mean to be a spoil sport).

cheers
Hugh
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
714 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
hwilliams said:
Does it matter that the seat post binder's faces are not parallel? How are you planing on clamping it shut?
I hope i am missing something here (dont mean to be a spoil sport).

cheers
Hugh
You'll have to wait to see I suppose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Frame looks great!

Is this frame built out of 4130 or something differnt? I noticed you said you used it for the seat stays. I have just never seen chromolly with a bright finish like this before. Usually it is brownish when I get it.

If you want to controll the heat a little easier around the seat clamp area make yourself an aluminum plug the same diameter as the piece of steel that you have in there to hold the diameter. The aluminum will suck some heat out of the weld as well as expand a little bit and hold the tube a little more round.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top