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Bikesexual
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I started MTB about a year+ ago, bought an entry level bike - some basic necessities and off I went to try a sport I wanted to do before but never had taken a chance.

Now? Price Point loves me and wants to take me to dinner! I can't believe how much stuff I bought in the last 3 months or so. New Tires - New Camel Back - New Glasses - Shorts - Jersey - 2 multi-tools - more shorts - break levers - new pedals - and signed up for Strava.

Next a better bike! - does it ever end? If you are new (or not) maybe you can share your beginner's fever!

Bottom line, I'm not sure if to Thank you guys or hate you LOL :madman:
 

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jcd I'm about to fall into that same pit.

I'm in the process of deciding on my first FS bike and once I buy that I can already tell its going to be a cascade of shorts, pedals and shoes. Luckily my gf got me a camelbak for Christmas (a Mule!) so I can cross that one off my list.

And I thought my snowboarding habit was expensive....
 

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I now get personalized emails from Universal Cycles thanking me whenever I place an order. I looked over my purchase history from them and almost choked when adding up the total spent. Meh. It's no cheaper than hookers and blow, but much more socially and spouse-ly acceptable.
 
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I now get personalized emails from Universal Cycles thanking me whenever I place an order. I looked over my purchase history from them and almost choked when adding up the total spent. Meh. It's no cheaper than hookers and blow, but much more socially and spouse-ly acceptable.
Don't take this the wrong way, but: Even though mountain biking is a better way to live, when I'm 85 I'd rather die from hookers and blow than in a bike crash.
 

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Don't take this the wrong way, but: Even though mountain biking is a better way to live, when I'm 85 I'd rather die from hookers and blow than in a bike crash.
:lol: Absolutely! It's just that only one of those will get me killed at 41 when my wife finds out! Actually, given my spending history on MTB, maybe they both will :idea:
 

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I've upgraded my grips, pedals, fork, tires, bought the multi tool and frame pump, bike computer, saddle bag, helmet, currently looking for a decent reasonably priced hydro pack for the warm months and a saddle that don't make me walk funny. I haven't gone overboard with high dollar stuff but I've still dropped quite a bit of coin into my bike. I consider it money well spent. My friends look at me like I have 3 heads when I tell them my Recon Gold fork was a deal at $250. None of them have ever even spent that much on a whole bike.

It's almost as if my mountain bike has turned into an adult version of one of those upgradeable fighting robot models, Gundams or whatever they were called. It's a disease. Practical or not, must.....upgrade............something!
 

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squish, squish in da fish
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2,147 Posts
yeah it happens. i bought a new crankset, ring, chain, 40t cog, built a wheelset, jockey wheels, bars, & several tools just so i could have the trickle down effect to my xc ss bike. people think i'm friggin nuts to have 3k into a hardtail. now i'm trying to convince the wife to let me buy a beer ebb for the ss
 

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Bikesexual
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've upgraded my grips, pedals, fork, tires, bought the multi tool and frame pump, bike computer, saddle bag, helmet, currently looking for a decent reasonably priced hydro pack for the warm months and a saddle that don't make me walk funny. I haven't gone overboard with high dollar stuff but I've still dropped quite a bit of coin into my bike. I consider it money well spent. My friends look at me like I have 3 heads when I tell them my Recon Gold fork was a deal at $250. None of them have ever even spent that much on a whole bike.

It's almost as if my mountain bike has turned into an adult version of one of those upgradeable fighting robot models, Gundams or whatever they were called. It's a disease. Practical or not, must.....upgrade............something!
Well if this helps I just got this one in the mail today. Fits a bunch of stuff, of course it depends if you do really long 6hr rides.

Hydrapak Lone Pine 70oz Hydration Pack | HydraPak | Brand | www.PricePoint.com
 

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LOL, son of a b*tch. I just checked out an order with them for a new saddle and seatpost. That's not expensive enough to get the free shipping! Damn.

That is a great deal, I wish I'd have seen it. I've been leaning towards the milspec ones on ebay. Every military surplus item I've ever bought has had great quality and is usually really cheap. They just don't have the brand badge. Gonna check the local army surplus tomorrow!
 

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Bikesexual
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
LOL, son of a b*tch. I just checked out an order with them for a new saddle and seatpost. That's not expensive enough to get the free shipping! Damn.

That is a great deal, I wish I'd have seen it. I've been leaning towards the milspec ones on ebay. Every military surplus item I've ever bought has had great quality and is usually really cheap. They just don't have the brand badge. Gonna check the local army surplus tomorrow!
Same happened to me LOL so I picked up a cell phone case for $5.98 and got free shipping - Happy Shopping!
 

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EMBA Member
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536 Posts
A dropper post is always a great addition. Just don't look at the price. My one fear is when I die my wife sells all my stuff at the price that I told her I bought it for. It never ends thank God. And worth every penny. I will be forever in the debt to Nathan who told me to buy a bike off Craigs List; if I don't like it I can always sell it for what I paid for it. I was hooked right off the bat. People who don't bike think I am crazy when I tell them how much I paid for my last bike. But I know you guys all understand. Slim
 

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Rogue Exterminator
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4,951 Posts
I started MTB about a year+ ago, bought an entry level bike - some basic necessities and off I went to try a sport I wanted to do before but never had taken a chance.

Now? Price Point loves me and wants to take me to dinner! I can't believe how much stuff I bought in the last 3 months or so. New Tires - New Camel Back - New Glasses - Shorts - Jersey - 2 multi-tools - more shorts - break levers - new pedals - and signed up for Strava.

Next a better bike! - does it ever end? If you are new (or not) maybe you can share your beginner's fever!

Bottom line, I'm not sure if to Thank you guys or hate you LOL :madman:
Little over a year ago.

Bought an entry level bike.
Crashed it in a tree, tacoed the wheel, bent the frame, etc
Bought another little bit nicer entry level bike the next day.
Few months later saw a steal on a new full suspension bike and bought it.
Few months after that decided to trade the hardtail for a road bike because I could not ride mountain bikes due to a shoulder injury (from more crashing).
Recently bought a single speed mountain bike few weeks ago and I still trying to figure out which bike will be next.

Oh and you don't want to know the gears and accessories bought in that time.

(BTW, I don't make a lot of money either)
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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18,453 Posts
When I got my first mountain bike, I put on clipless pedals, a racing saddle, and Avid Speed Dial levers in pretty short order.

In retrospect, the levers were dumb, but the rest was good.

I also stuck on a mud tire that I rode overinflated. I was in college and it was my One True Bike at the time. I had a theory that the high tire pressure would help on the road and the huge tread blocks would mean it would still work for MTB.

I sold that bike years ago, so when I decided to get back into MTB in 2007, I had to buy a new one. I still had my old saddle and pedals (still really like those models, though I think I finally destroyed my original ones) but I replaced the fork, bar and stem pretty quickly and stuck on bar ends. In retrospect, I shouldn't have hurried so much to get the bike and should have bought used. But while the RockShox Jett the old bike had sucked, I didn't figure that out until I put a "real" fork on my Hardrock. The Jett never seized, at least, but I think I could also have given the Hardrock's bars a chance. They were risers, and wider than what the Schwinn Mesa I'd had in college had. I thought they looked like they belonged on a beach cruiser and made my riding position too upright, but I now like bars with some width and try to use stem selection and position to adjust riding position: it's cheaper and easier.

I finished a MS recently and started a new, better-paying job. After six years of struggling to keep my Hardrock rolling, and able to go from the gun to the finish line without a mechanical problem during a race, I wanted a new bike, that would come out of the box with parts I'd be content to keep long-term. I wasn't necessarily thinking race bike until I rode some 140 and 120 mm bikes and decided I'm too young and have too many XC seasons left to do for that.

The bill for the New Hotness, a '13 Kona Hei Hei DL, took me a couple deep breaths and a little planning of pay checks. But I'm really enjoying it and I've been happy enough to put on "my" saddle and pedals, "my" tires, and a -17 stem, and just ride the thing. Since new bikes rarely if ever come out of the box with the right contact points for a particular rider, I'm feeling pretty good about that.

I think it took knowing where the break point between flaky drivetrain bits and reliable drivetrain bits happens, and what I want from my suspension components. I always used to do my own work, which I think helps, and I've had the opportunity to demo a number of bikes including 140+ travel bikes, carbon hardtails, the different wheel sizes, etc. I also figured out about tire pressure somewhere along the way, which has made the ride smoother on all my bikes, rigid and suspension alike.

I might go to a flat bar on this bike, since the stem is slammed and I'm curious about moving the grips down. And if the front wheel needs to be trued again this season, I might try to replace it. I'll also ask about using heavier oil in the shock damper when I hit the 100-hour service. But otherwise, I think it's done. Oops, and maybe a sturdier front axle, since I've damaged the one I have.

FWIW, I went out of my way to demo some bikes with dropper posts last Fall. I found them hard to use and they didn't really make anything easier for me.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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18,453 Posts
I should add that I replaced almost everything else on the Hardrock too, over time. It got a lot more reliable with a LX/SLX/Deore drivetrain and the oft-maligned Avid Elixirs. So I think if people can swing a Deore or better drivetrain and good fork right out of the gate, that's a good place to be. The best value going is to buy a bike that's already got the build one wants, maintain it well, and upgrade nothing.
 

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I should add that I replaced almost everything else on the Hardrock too, over time. It got a lot more reliable with a LX/SLX/Deore drivetrain and the oft-maligned Avid Elixirs. So I think if people can swing a Deore or better drivetrain and good fork right out of the gate, that's a good place to be. The best value going is to buy a bike that's already got the build one wants, maintain it well, and upgrade nothing.
what fun is that...and you miss the meal ticket
 
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