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Hey,
My brother and I just got new Jamis Durango Sport SX mountain mikes. So far we are extremely happy with the bikes, they are well worth the money. Anyway, after riding for about 2-3 hours my wrists start to hurt me and continue even after onto the next day. Would It be an adjustment with the handlebar? OR my position or form on the bike? Would like to know, thanks!



bstguitarist
KB1LQC
 

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bstguitarist said:
Hey,
My brother and I just got new Jamis Durango Sport SX mountain mikes. So far we are extremely happy with the bikes, they are well worth the money. Anyway, after riding for about 2-3 hours my wrists start to hurt me and continue even after onto the next day. Would It be an adjustment with the handlebar? OR my position or form on the bike? Would like to know, thanks!

bstguitarist
KB1LQC
Could be handle position but more likely you just need to ride more. Your wrists will get stronger.
 

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Daniel the Dog
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Probably the same reason you have hair on your palms

bstguitarist said:
Hey,
My brother and I just got new Jamis Durango Sport SX mountain mikes. So far we are extremely happy with the bikes, they are well worth the money. Anyway, after riding for about 2-3 hours my wrists start to hurt me and continue even after onto the next day. Would It be an adjustment with the handlebar? OR my position or form on the bike? Would like to know, thanks!

bstguitarist
KB1LQC
No, you are not positioned right on your bike or your bars are not angled correctly. I would something is not right. If you can, go back to the shop where you bought the bike and get fitted.

Jaybo
 

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Domestic Fowl
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869 Posts
There could be a few things going on...

First, it could just be getting used to riding. I used to get aches in my wrists in the early season, then I would get used to riding and it wasn't a problem.

Second, your shock might be set up too stiff. Look at the manual for the fork and read up on the adjustments. If you didn't get one with the bike you can usually download the manuals at the fork manufacturer's web site.

Third, your brake levers may be rotated too far forward or back. This causes you to have your wrists at an unnatural angle when you're riding, which can cause problems.

Fourth, your bike fit might not be right. Your bike shop should help you out fitting your bike. This usually entails setting seat position(height and front-to-back), and handlebar position(height and front-to-back).
 

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noMAD man
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12,227 Posts
Any previous injuries?

bstguitarist said:
Hey,
My brother and I just got new Jamis Durango Sport SX mountain mikes. So far we are extremely happy with the bikes, they are well worth the money. Anyway, after riding for about 2-3 hours my wrists start to hurt me and continue even after onto the next day. Would It be an adjustment with the handlebar? OR my position or form on the bike? Would like to know, thanks!

bstguitarist
KB1LQC
All of the suggestions, except the amputation, could fit your situation. I was wondering if you've had any recurring wrist injuries from other sports or activities? I have a left wrist that hurts some regardless of what I do because of dirt motorcycle and MTB get-offs where I injured that wrist. It doesn't keep me from riding, but it's there. I notice your age, so probably it's just an issue of adjustment or a matter of time to develop your wrists for riding.
 

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Map Maker
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1,244 Posts
First make sure your fit is correct on the bike. this includeds all of the good suggestions in above post such as seat height and brake levers. Fork set is is key - if your rebound is to stiff you could be getting some kick back.
Sometimes a stem with a higher rise will help as well.

Next try different grips - OURY grips help me alot - other grips I find are too small or too hard and I end up with wrist and hand fatigue.
this is a 10$ fix or option.

The one I think will help the most is get a carbon bar - LP composites or Easton make good bars that will hep dampen out trail chatter-
look for easton monkey lights on sale at Price point or jenson for $59 - 68.
this is the most expensive option.
 

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A couple of thing that helped me....

After dealing with hand and wrist pain, I found a couple of things that helped...

1) I went with a shorter and higher rise stem and moved my seat a little forward - much more comfortable. I was overly stretched out based on a long spec stem that came with the bike (130mm). Adding a little rise evened out pressure between my hands and my butt - before, my bars were considerably lower than my seat and alot of pressure went onto my hands/wrists.

2) Bought a carbon riser bar to replace a flat aluminum bar. Again, put me a bit more upright. The carbon helped by absorbing some of the vibration I felt through the aluminum bar.

3) Changed grips. Found that a thinner grip actually helped over a thicker grip. This takes a bit of trail and error. Just because a grip is thicker, doesn't mean it will be more comfortable - especially true with smaller hands and based on what kind of gloves (if any) you use.

4) Started to run bar ends again. I know, a fashion no-no these days with risers and all, but it helped. Being able to move my hands to multiple positions when REALLY helped. This makes a world of differenece. People have dropped bar ends in favor of risers and usually don't run bar ends because of fashion and the fact they feel risers give the leverage (since they are usually wide bars) that ends supplied. Fine, but the one thing that risers don't offer is more hand positions. You will be amazed how much being able to take different positions will help your pain.

5) Try some Specialized gloves with the "body geometery" feature. They have additional gel pads placed in areas that cover some of the nerves in your hands and wrists. They have this feature in alot of their gloves and I have owned three pairs over the last few years - nice gloves anyway, but the extra gel padding helped alot.

All of the above have helped me to get a more comfortable and pain-free ride.
 

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Time is not a road.
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4,150 Posts
Check the angle your wrists make while in contact with the bar. It should be in line with your arm. If you have your wrists bent while riding, you're causing stress on the joint.

Adjust your fit until your wrists are neutral - lower your seat, raise your bars, get risers, different stem rise, shorter stem, move the saddle back, whatever it may take. It's a fit issue, unless you have chronic wrist problems, in which case you need more expert care.
 

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bstguitarist said:
Hey,
My brother and I just got new Jamis Durango Sport SX mountain mikes. So far we are extremely happy with the bikes, they are well worth the money. Anyway, after riding for about 2-3 hours my wrists start to hurt me and continue even after onto the next day. Would It be an adjustment with the handlebar? OR my position or form on the bike? Would like to know, thanks!

bstguitarist
KB1LQC
You should ride with your wrists straight. They should not be bent in any direction. You need a good bike fit and you must learn not to bend your wrists. You could have the perfect setup, but if you use the wrong technique.....you'll still get sore wrists
 

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Ride on
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tilt your saddle back

If the nose of your saddle is tilted down your weight will tend to slide forward, putting extra stress on your wrists to maintain your posture. You can adjust the tilt of your saddle back a bit to keep this from happening.
 
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