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Okay this is kind of an off the wall question, but serious enough...

Lets say I had been running nice large nobby and grippy tires for a while. If I replaced both the front and rear with the same kind of lower tread racier tires, would I become a better bike handler or would I just kill myself and have less fun?

I would like to try lighter faster tires, and was curious if it could also make me a better rider...
 

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Wish I Were Riding said:
Okay this is kind of an off the wall question, but serious enough...

Lets say I had been running nice large nobby and grippy tires for a while. If I replaced both the front and rear with the same kind of lower tread racier tires, would I become a better bike handler or would I just kill myself and have less fun?

I would like to try lighter faster tires, and was curious if it could also make me a better rider...
My experience has been the "kill myself and have less fun" result. I now stick with knobby tires that I have confidence in and put a fast roller on the rear only if I'm racing and the course is silly smooth or has lots of dirt road. I notice the lack of traction on the front more than on the rear, thus the swapping of rear tire only.
 

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Wish I Were Riding said:
Okay this is kind of an off the wall question, but serious enough...

Lets say I had been running nice large nobby and grippy tires for a while. If I replaced both the front and rear with the same kind of lower tread racier tires, would I become a better bike handler or would I just kill myself and have less fun?

I would like to try lighter faster tires, and was curious if it could also make me a better rider...
Maybe, maybe not (to both questions).

I do believe that learning to ride with partial traction, ride "light" and picking good lines is a good idea. "Lesser" tires can help as they can force you to deal with all of the above.

Ba ware of the possible limitations of the new tires and you can have fun, not kill yourself and learn new skills. Even if it does not make you faster you should end up being a smoother rider that is easier on your equipment.
 

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You could also try just replacing the rear with a "racier" tire. The increase in speed should make help to make you a better rider, and the same grip up front should help to minimize the "kill myself and have less fun" factor.
 

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I'm not sure that's what Nietzsche had in mind with that whole "What does not kill us makes us stronger" thing. Sometimes it can leave you with nasty scars and a limp. While you're on your learning curve you can loose a lot of time and places in races. You can always just try riding faster with grippier tires to find the edges of your envelope.
 
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