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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a while since I've done any riding but I just retired and don't want to sit in front of the computer all day.
I could use some help in finding the perfect bike. (or at least come within a mile from my goal :p)
1) 5'8" tall 30" inseam
2) Main use: road/side of the road/dirt roads. Not really for off road trails.
3) Disc brakes OR the ability to install discs.
4) Looking for used.
5) Tires I can change out.
6) Might even convert this over to a mid drive electric someday.:rolleyes:

Let the games begin.

Thanks ahead of time for the help.:thumbsup:
 

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Where do you live? We can't suggest used market options without the ability to search the local used market.

What's your budget? $500? $5,000?

Do you have any interest in riding mountain bike trails at all? Long distances?

Emphasis on being comfortable or being fast? Those are not mutually exclusive but most bikes make some compromise for one over the other.

A hardtail or rigid XC (cross country) mountain bike would serve you well, maybe with a change to some lighter, slicker tires over the heavier, knobbier ones that come with most bikes.

You're probably looking for a medium bike, which might have a 17-18" seat tube by conventional sizing methods.
 

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Bikes in jeans
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Price range is crucial.

Salsa makes some cool stuff like the fargo and cutthroat, Cannondale slate maybe, Santa Cruz Stigmata. Sounds like you're more in gravel/CX territory, that's the direction I'd be looking based on your description, or a versatile hardtail 29er if you prefer flat bars which can use 700C road/CX tires or switch to mountain rims and tires if needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Where do you live? We can't suggest used market options without the ability to search the local used market.

What's your budget? $500? $5,000?

Do you have any interest in riding mountain bike trails at all? Long distances?

Emphasis on being comfortable or being fast? Those are not mutually exclusive but most bikes make some compromise for one over the other.

A hardtail or rigid XC (cross country) mountain bike would serve you well, maybe with a change to some lighter, slicker tires over the heavier, knobbier ones that come with most bikes.

You're probably looking for a medium bike, which might have a 17-18" seat tube by conventional sizing methods.
I knew I forgot something.
South of the Seattle area. Plan on moving to ID.
I use CL/Offerup and FB market place to search.
Budget $500
Comfort - not fast
Suspension - no big deal.
Yes on the size.
 

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Sounds like a "touring bike" is right up your alley. Low and stable, comfortable for long rides. Salsa is the first place I would look. An old steel 26" mtb with a rigid fork will take your far. Look up the old Bridgestone MB-1. Out of your price range, but Rivendel-style bikes might appeal to you. The older REI Novara brand had some great bikes like the Safari and the Randonee that might work for ya.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sounds like a "touring bike" is right up your alley. Low and stable, comfortable for long rides. Salsa is the first place I would look. An old steel 26" mtb with a rigid fork will take your far. Look up the old Bridgestone MB-1. Out of your price range, but Rivendel-style bikes might appeal to you. The older REI Novara brand had some great bikes like the Safari and the Randonee that might work for ya.
None of the Bridgestone MB-1 pictures showed them with disc brakes or the ability to put them on.
The Safari and the Randonee were either non existent or didn't fit.
 

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Yes, Bridgestone are pre-disc brake era by several years. Even today, a lot of hardcore touring bikes use rim brakes. I didn't mean for that to be a specific suggestion, just a starting point for inspiration so you can think outside the box. Disc brakes are great, but for your application, rim brakes would be fine and that opens up a ton of options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, Bridgestone are pre-disc brake era by several years. Even today, a lot of hardcore touring bikes use rim brakes. I didn't mean for that to be a specific suggestion, just a starting point for inspiration so you can think outside the box. Disc brakes are great, but for your application, rim brakes would be fine and that opens up a ton of options.
I've ridden bikes with v brakes that completely sucked. That's why I just decided to put down as a "want", discs.
Too many different types of v brakes to keep track of.:madman:
If you say those work, then good.
 

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I've ridden bikes with v brakes that completely sucked. That's why I just decided to put down as a "want", discs.
Too many different types of v brakes to keep track of.:madman:
If you say those work, then good.
Your price range really puts you out of decent disc brakes. I'll take V's all day long over most mech discs. Maybe you had some bad ones or something, but there's so few models compared to discs I'm not at all sure what you mean by too many different types. There's only like 3 companies still making them and in the past 20 years, there's be basically no significant changes to them at all. If you V's sucked, they were probably setup incorrectly or had less modulation that you were expecting because they can easily stop a rim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK, makes sense now. I'm learning.

edit: The reason I put down, "the ability to add discs later." was to keep the price down.
 

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fair enough. I am a fan of disc brakes and would not go back for the way I ride. Just be aware that disc brakes can suck too. Just like any rim brake, it depends on the design and how it is set up and maintained. You're not one of them, but many people think that switching to disc brakes is always and automatic upgrade, but it's not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

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Dustin Klein does the kind of riding you describe and he seemed to like the Aventon gravel bike above for $600. I was surprised he liked it so much in light of the high-end bikes he usually has.

https://youtu.be/SrRhyMmudzU

His channel sounds right up your alley anyhow- PNW gravel scene. There's also a gravel sub-forum on this site that may be of more help if you decide to go that way.
 

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Dustin Klein does the kind of riding you describe and he seemed to like the Aventon gravel bike above for $600. I was surprised he liked it so much in light of the high-end bikes he usually has.

https://youtu.be/SrRhyMmudzU

His channel sounds right up your alley anyhow- PNW gravel scene. There's also a gravel sub-forum on this site that may be of more help if you decide to go that way.
He is one of the few I follow on Youtube.I enjoy his content. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Much thanks.:)
 

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Most of the touring and gravel type bikes are going to be sized in centimeters in Euro tradition. I am guessing you're looking for a 50-52cm frame. Hard to tell without riding it though.

I have done 100km gravel road rides on a rigid steel 29er (singlespeed even) that I usually use for trails. I put a bigger chainring, lighter tires, and bar ends on it for those rides and it worked fine. I really find a handlebar with multiple hand positions to be essential for long road rides, paved or dirt, which is why bikes designed for drop bars (typically a much shorter top tube to accommodate the extra reach of the handlebar and shifter levers) works best for this. A close second place is a flat bar with bar ends bolted on, or some sort of curvy "alt bar".

For more touring bike porn, look up Bunyan Velo Magazine.
 
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