Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 2008 haro flightline sport and I'm wondering if I should upgrade the componets on it or just get a new bike. I would save money if I just upgraded the componets but does the haro have a good enough frame to make it worth upgrading? I don't want to waste money putting good componets on a bad frame. I'm a beginner, this would be my first time upgrading. So, does the haro have a good enough frame to make it worth upgrading componets? thanks http://www.bikepedia.com/Quickbike/BikeSpecs.aspx?Year=2008&Brand=Haro&Model=Flightline+Sport&Type=bike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,808 Posts
Replace what breaks or wears out. The cheapest components are attached to a new a new bike. Wait to the end of the year when the new models come out and buy last years bike at a good discount. The other way is to buy a good second hand bike. Adding new components will not add a lot of value to your bike.
 

·
Fat-tired Roadie
Joined
·
18,453 Posts
Those frames look like they run a bit short. People's fitness drifts when they get into riding, and their fit changes too.

Test ride some bikes at your LBS, and see if something else fits you better now - it may make the decision much easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Andrw, what do you mean by " those frames look like they run a bit short". Do you mean size wise? Thanks
 

·
Fat-tired Roadie
Joined
·
18,453 Posts
The proportions.

Bike sizing is completely stupid. The nominal size of a bike (like 17") is a measurement from the center of the bottom bracket, along the seat tube, to one of about four points on the frame. It's not very meaningful because the seat post can be raised or lowered anyway. Someone has to be very tall or very short not to be able to get the right pedals-saddle distance on almost any frame.

To me, the most important dimension on a bike frame is effective top tube length - the length from the center of the intersection of the top tube and head tube to the center of where the top tube would intersect the seatpost if it was horizontal.

Most bikes with a given nominal size have about the same effective top tube length. The Flightline's top tube is about an inch shorter at any given size than that.

A lot of beginners are also sized in totally asinine ways - stand over the bike, see if there's enough clearance, get sold the frame. Clearance for what? Sitting on the top tube? Those of us who are right around average height or a little below don't get a lot of clearance from a modern front-suspended hardtail, unless it's something like a dirt jump or trials bike, so the result of that kind of sizing is getting sold a bike that's too small. A lot of beginner models, like the Flightline and Trek's 3-series, also have a shorter top tube than their manufacturers' higher end models.

If someone's not in very good shape or doesn't want to work very hard, he's likely to ride in a very upright position. Riders who pedal continuously ride in a lower position, to counterbalance the pedaling; the stronger they are, the lower that position gets, at least as flexibility allows. A very strong rider may actually pull up on the bars to counter the pedaling; even a modest rider does that in a sprint.

None of this necessarily applies to you. However, chances are that when you entered the sport, you didn't buy the size bike that you'd choose if you had it to do over. You can do it over if you want to, and riding some other bikes will give you an idea as to whether you want a different bike, or if you think your Flightline totally kicks ass, and you'd rather bolt the money to it.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top