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The Twinloc does just that for the rear shock, by reducing the positive air chamber volume. Although it only changes damping, not spring rate, on all compatible forks. I used to race a Genius 130mm travel bike. I think it would remain competitive in XC to this day...it just could have used a touch more anti-squat and a slight boost in rear-end stiffness. 130mm/90mm/Locked.
Impossible to change air chamber volume and not spring rate…P=F/A
can‘t change basic scientific principles even tho some here would like too.
 

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Impossible to change air chamber volume and not spring rate…P=F/A
can‘t change basic scientific principles even tho some here would like too.
I think he was just saying it does not change air chamber volume on forks. That’s only a rear shock feature. For forks (and I think the Rockshox rears) Twinloc is a three position damper remote.
 

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Personally I think they should offer a Bainless Epic in 100mm travel with the SidLuxe and SID Ultimate SL. I don't think the XC race bike needs bain hardware at all.
The brain is actually pretty cool. I did a race sim and was very impressed. It just worked, the bike was stiff when I wanted it to be and rear wheel tracked when like a stupid bike across the rough.
 

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The brain is actually pretty cool. I did a race sim and was very impressed. It just worked, the bike was stiff when I wanted it to be and rear wheel tracked when like a stupid bike across the rough.
Yeah that's how it feels for the first 20 hrs. After that it just feels harsh once the shock is past that fresh service feeling. For people who have their bikes serviced regularly (way before 50hrs) Its going to feel great. Hence I'd prefer a brainless version. I do like the stiffness in the new frame. This helps the bike track quite well
 

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Every time I've demoed a Brain bike, it felt harsh. They probably don't service those demo bikes very often. And everyone I know who owns a Brain bike just seem to experience one problem after another.

But then I'm a regular guy with a job and doing suspension service every 20 hours to save 10 seconds on a 1 hour ride isn't at the top of my priority list. For Jordan Sarrou, I'm sure it's well worth it.
 

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Every time I've demoed a Brain bike, it felt harsh. They probably don't service those demo bikes very often. And everyone I know who owns a Brain bike just seem to experience one problem after another.

But then I'm a regular guy with a job and doing suspension service every 20 hours to save 10 seconds on a 1 hour ride isn't at the top of my priority list. For Jordan Sarrou, I'm sure it's well worth it.

When when it gets harsh I mean that its much more harsh than new. The new feeling I can live with but yes often demo bikes come in and go out with little consideration for servicing after every test ride. Most of the tme it has to go to a Specialized Service centre where they will just swap out the suspension units. I cant see demo bikes gettting sent in every week for shock turn around.
hen there's that clunk clunk clunk at the back that drives me nuts...
 

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Yeah that's how it feels for the first 20 hrs. After that it just feels harsh once the shock is past that fresh service feeling. For people who have their bikes serviced regularly (way before 50hrs) Its going to feel great. Hence I'd prefer a brainless version. I do like the stiffness in the new frame. This helps the bike track quite well
The one I am riding has 400hrs on it. I have only done the basic air can service in it.
 

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When when it gets harsh I mean that its much more harsh than new. The new feeling I can live with but yes often demo bikes come in and go out with little consideration for servicing after every test ride. Most of the tme it has to go to a Specialized Service centre where they will just swap out the suspension units. I cant see demo bikes gettting sent in every week for shock turn around.
hen there's that clunk clunk clunk at the back that drives me nuts...
My quick take the Brain and Suspension as a whole.

When you are going full gas the brain works really well. The bike just works the way I want it to, without me having to make changes. Where I find the brain less than desirable is at more pedestrian speeds. That sharpness and stiff ride that is awesome when I giving it, is less than desirable when I am cruising.

My biggest complaint though is not with the brain, it is with the shock. Every in-line shock I have ridden has always suffered from heat build up on long descents but one on Epic gets far hotter than any shock I have used. Hot enough that it significantly impacts the bike on a long descent. I suspect the small air volume and shock body is the issue here.

Today I did a quick comparison on a descent that is about 10 minutes length. At the top of the descent the bike was working well, as the descent progressed I was having to push harder and harder with my feet to get the rear wheel to bite. About 3/4 of the way down I did a quick stop and reset the travel marker. During the top of the trail I was using all the rear wheel travel, on the bottom of the trail I was using about 70% of travel. The shock was hot enough that it was now far too stiff for me.

Now for XCO racing this isn't an issue, 10 minute descents pretty well don't exist, but for marathon racing on the other hand this might matter. Fortunately the brain does allow me to adjust for this. All need to do is set my base pressure a bit lower. Without the brain this would compromise the pedalling characteristics of the bike.
 

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Now for XCO racing this isn't an issue, 10 minute descents pretty well don't exist, but for marathon racing on the other hand this might matter.
I think this is an important point. I came to a similar realization about brakes a few years ago. Some brakes (e.g. XTR Race and SRAM Level) are really meant for XCO, not the riding I do everyday or the racing that exists for me regionally. They heat up and get overwhelmed by sustained steep descents beyond about three minutes. With as capable as modern bikes are (geometrically etc.), it's easy to forget that some products are really meant for a sub 15 minute lap with tech/feed zones.
 

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Impossible to change air chamber volume and not spring rate…P=F/A
can‘t change basic scientific principles even tho some here would like too.
Sorry, what I was trying to say. That the shock reduces volume and therefore spring rate, while the fork does not adjust spring rate.

Adjusted with twin lock between "Descend" and "Traction"
Air Volume/Spring Rate: Shock Only
Damping: Shock & Fork
 

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My quick take the Brain and Suspension as a whole.

When you are going full gas the brain works really well. The bike just works the way I want it to, without me having to make changes. Where I find the brain less than desirable is at more pedestrian speeds. That sharpness and stiff ride that is awesome when I giving it, is less than desirable when I am cruising.

My biggest complaint though is not with the brain, it is with the shock. Every in-line shock I have ridden has always suffered from heat build up on long descents but one on Epic gets far hotter than any shock I have used. Hot enough that it significantly impacts the bike on a long descent. I suspect the small air volume and shock body is the issue here.

Today I did a quick comparison on a descent that is about 10 minutes length. At the top of the descent the bike was working well, as the descent progressed I was having to push harder and harder with my feet to get the rear wheel to bite. About 3/4 of the way down I did a quick stop and reset the travel marker. During the top of the trail I was using all the rear wheel travel, on the bottom of the trail I was using about 70% of travel. The shock was hot enough that it was now far too stiff for me.

Now for XCO racing this isn't an issue, 10 minute descents pretty well don't exist, but for marathon racing on the other hand this might matter. Fortunately the brain does allow me to adjust for this. All need to do is set my base pressure a bit lower. Without the brain this would compromise the pedalling characteristics of the bike.
Are you running the brain fork too? I like the brain on the rear, but use the light setting, on the fork I couldn’t come to terms with feel.
 

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Are you running the brain fork too? I like the brain on the rear, but use the light setting, on the fork I couldn’t come to terms with feel.
No, I have step cast 32.

I used a Fox Terralogic about 10 years ago, really liked it for racing. Not so much for riding.
 
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I had the 2004 epic with a terralogic fork. It was a bit clunky when trundling around but it felt great for racing and both fork and shock where faultless for 6 years with just annual servicing.

I'm amazed how unreliable the current brain shocks are.
 

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My quick take the Brain and Suspension as a whole.

When you are going full gas the brain works really well. The bike just works the way I want it to, without me having to make changes. Where I find the brain less than desirable is at more pedestrian speeds. That sharpness and stiff ride that is awesome when I giving it, is less than desirable when I am cruising.

My biggest complaint though is not with the brain, it is with the shock. Every in-line shock I have ridden has always suffered from heat build up on long descents but one on Epic gets far hotter than any shock I have used. Hot enough that it significantly impacts the bike on a long descent. I suspect the small air volume and shock body is the issue here.

Today I did a quick comparison on a descent that is about 10 minutes length. At the top of the descent the bike was working well, as the descent progressed I was having to push harder and harder with my feet to get the rear wheel to bite. About 3/4 of the way down I did a quick stop and reset the travel marker. During the top of the trail I was using all the rear wheel travel, on the bottom of the trail I was using about 70% of travel. The shock was hot enough that it was now far too stiff for me.

Now for XCO racing this isn't an issue, 10 minute descents pretty well don't exist, but for marathon racing on the other hand this might matter. Fortunately the brain does allow me to adjust for this. All need to do is set my base pressure a bit lower. Without the brain this would compromise the pedalling characteristics of the bike.
well for XCO racer their bikes get serviced pretty much after every run. They're typically switching between their two available bikes all the time. I don't have that luxury. Also the Brain rear shock and fork seems to be more affected by oil heat build up and I suspect this has to do with more cavitation taking place with the inertia valve circuit switching on an off. It might not be severe enough to pit the components but its enough to cause stiction in the system ans slow the actuation of the valve

I think this is an important point. I came to a similar realization about brakes a few years ago. Some brakes (e.g. XTR Race and SRAM Level) are really meant for XCO, not the riding I do everyday or the racing that exists for me regionally. They heat up and get overwhelmed by sustained steep descents beyond about three minutes. With as capable as modern bikes are (geometrically etc.), it's easy to forget that some products are really meant for a sub 15 minute lap with tech/feed zones.
Fully agree, race day XCO components don't work well in Stage races or marathon events. I've seen how challenged mineral oil systems are after one stage of the Cape Epic. Brake bleeds are just too common at those types of events.

No, I have step cast 32.

I used a Fox Terralogic about 10 years ago, really liked it for racing. Not so much for riding.
I had the Lefty FOx Terrible Logic from 2006 through to 2010. That system I enjoyed for racing but it was maintenance intensive. I prefered the Speed DLR 110 for day to day use.
 

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well for XCO racer their bikes get serviced pretty much after every run. They're typically switching between their two available bikes all the time.
Is this opinion or fact? Because if it is fact you have information that contrary to mine.
 

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To be fair, when I demoed the Epic, it was the 2018-2020 generation and not the current generation. What was interesting is that I also demoed a Pivot Mach 4 with live valve on the same day. That live valve felt 100% more plush than the Epic - it was like riding on air. But when I bombed rock gardens and root gardens at high speed, that Epic held its line while the Pivot deflected and I almost crashed several times. It was interesting that the more comfortable bike was less confidence inspiring at speed.
 

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To be fair, when I demoed the Epic, it was the 2018-2020 generation and not the current generation. What was interesting is that I also demoed a Pivot Mach 4 with live valve on the same day. That live valve felt 100% more plush than the Epic - it was like riding on air. But when I bombed rock gardens and root gardens at high speed, that Epic held its line while the Pivot deflected and I almost crashed several times. It was interesting that the more comfortable bike was less confidence inspiring at speed.
I really like the Live Valve. I hope the 2nd generation is what Fox hopes it is.

Frame flex is a weird thing, it isn't a problem at all, until it suddenly is a major problem. Sort how I feel about the SC32. That fork is great until you reach a critical load and then you aren't exactly sure where the front wheel is.
 

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I really like the Live Valve. I hope the 2nd generation is what Fox hopes it is.

Frame flex is a weird thing, it isn't a problem at all, until it suddenly is a major problem. Sort how I feel about the SC32. That fork is great until you reach a critical load and then you aren't exactly sure where the front wheel is.
LMN, how do you tell when it's frame flex versus suspension that is setup too soft?
 

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Is this opinion or fact? Because if it is fact you have information that contrary to mine.
Fact for some teams apparently. That's how the CFR guys operate. Race bike +training bike. Guys will the course on training bike to scout the course. Then ride it on their race bikes and get the suspension dialled while the training bikes are serviced. Once
race bike is dialled its serviced and the riders are back on their training bikes. Simon mentioned in an interview the Specialized guys did the same and this was confirmed by JP. I don't know about Scott and the smaller teams.
 

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I have experience with previous gen Brain and totally agree with LMN, in training or just fooling around in forest the Brain felt too stiff and clunky and didn't liked it it all, but for full gas racing it came into it's own and i truly liked it.

I have a feeling the new Spark is opposite to that, all that geo and travel probably feels awesome riding around your home trails etc
 
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