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EAT MORE GRIME
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If you can't/won't do pogies then the next tip may help. Once your core is good and warm stop and swing your arms like a windmill as hard as you can until you can feel the blood pressure building up in your hands (maybe 30 seconds). This will open up your capillaries and increase the blood flow to your hands and make a big difference in keeping them warm,

so you can properly slap yourself for not getting pogies.
fixed that for you :)
 

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EAT MORE GRIME
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In the 2-5C range I like my dissent133.com gloves. They’re a layering system and you can buy all 4 gloves together or subsets. There’s a thin base layer, mid weight thermal layer then either a windproof or waterproof shell. I have the windproof pack and like them for those temps. I have more dexterity than ski gloves and can remove layers if I get warm. Much colder and I’m probably not riding, if I were then pogies make sense. They’re a little more money than your price range but not much. I paid about $75 but they’re out of the UK so you might get a better deal (looks like you’re in Italy).


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Discussion Starter #45
I honestly can't find any gloves sold in EU that are not super expensive, also not sure if I can risk with a copy of the Kincos!
So I'm considering some cheap pogies really and that are not HUGE and bulky. Any cheap ones from Amazon will do?
 

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Discussion Starter #46

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Pearl Izumi Lobster Claws are fantastic. I wore them in 20F on Sunday for 3 hours and my fingers were warm for the entire ride.
Yes, they are. If it's super cold or very windy my finger tips may get just a little cold so a liner makes them good to zero or more. They're the warmest gloves I've ever used or owned. They're well worth the money and have held up very well over the years.
 

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Thanks all!
I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).
Follow the links I posted for some gloves that will never leave your hands numb. They're not cheap, but as I said, I've abused mine by digging trails for hours, daily, in the winter and they're held up well. My hands sweat in the lobster gloves at 40 F, which is 10 C i believe.
 

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Thanks all!
I think I'll stick with regular gloves if I have to ride with pogies I'd rather take the bus really...

My Northwave are also waterproof and windproof (or they say).
We are not on the same page. Follow the links I posted for some gloves that will never leave your hands numb in any weather. They're not cheap, but as I said, I've abused mine by digging trails for hours and daily on vacation. These have been fantastic. My hands sweat in the lobster gloves at 40 F, which is 10 C i believe. I think you're experiencing numbness in your gloves.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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And that's the BIGGEST reason pogies work so well and are so widely recommended. You can wear a thin glove and maintain dexterity, but stay warm.
I think this point is generally lost by most people. I've tried riding in ski-gloves and there's not enough control to ride anything other than easy rolling wide trails at slow speed, apart from the additional issue of sweaty hands followed by eventual cold fingers that always seems to happen with those kind of gloves. The control using regular mtb gloves or glove-liners makes it like riding in the summer. There are some people that think for some reason that they won't be able to "get out" of the pogies if they fall. It makes no sense, because most people hold onto their bike when they all anyway and to come out you just let go like normal, nothing to hang up on. There's nothing "holding" your hands.

They are a big part of the "being comfortable outside in the cold" effect, where you are able to enjoy the ride and stay out indefinitely, vs. fighting the conditions while the clock is ticking away until your hands go numb.
 

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PHP:
I ride below freezing in the winter. Usually in the 20s and 30s (F).

I use medium weight ski gloves (and I still ride technical downhills) and I use a hunters muff to warm my hands when stopped. It wraps around my waist like a fanny-pack and is toasty warm (with a hand-warmer inside) when I place my hands inside.

https://heavy.com/outdoors/2018/10/hand-muff/
 

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I think this point is generally lost by most people. I've tried riding in ski-gloves and there's not enough control to ride anything other than easy rolling wide trails at slow speed, apart from the additional issue of sweaty hands followed by eventual cold fingers that always seems to happen with those kind of gloves. The control using regular mtb gloves or glove-liners makes it like riding in the summer. There are some people that think for some reason that they won't be able to "get out" of the pogies if they fall. It makes no sense, because most people hold onto their bike when they all anyway and to come out you just let go like normal, nothing to hang up on. There's nothing "holding" your hands.

They are a big part of the "being comfortable outside in the cold" effect, where you are able to enjoy the ride and stay out indefinitely, vs. fighting the conditions while the clock is ticking away until your hands go numb.
I had my first pogie related crash yesterday. I'm using ATV pogies, with snaps I installed in the ends that snap into the bar end plugs to keep them in place. The fabric on the pogies are a ripstop type nylon. The singletrack I was on yesterday runs through gambel oak. A branch snagged my pogies and held on just long enough to turn the bars, tear the fabric and send me down. I had no issues getting my hands out of the pogies to brace for impact.

Aside from that, I love our pogies. Thin glove liners are all that are needed, usually, and when that gets to be too much, I just fold them back over the bars. Many times I'll start the ride with the pogies on, then when body temp heats up, fold them back for the rest of the climb, the put them back to full coverage for the descents - that wind chill, even at 4-5 mph, takes it toll fast. Brake lever covers are also nice, and add grip with slippy glove liners...only for winter use though, annoying in the warmer months.
 

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I have been commuting in Calgary, AB in the winters for 15 years or so and have tried every variation and combination of things to keep my fingers and toes warm.

I am one of those guys who gets cold fingers and toes and way too easily. Once the temps get close to 0 Degrees C, I am preparing for the worst. Always have, even when I was a kid, so my biggest complaint about winter is I have never been able to consistently find the right gloves and footwear. i ride with other guys who can get away with a liner inside of a riding glove and will be fine when I feel like I am going to have to amputate my digits. It really sucks.

Snowboarding and ski gloves are too bulky to work and don't keep my fingers warm. Down mitts do well for warms but are terrible for riding. Various other attempts with wool liners, snowboard fleece liners, different riding specific winter gloves with or without liners have not been super successful, particularily past -10, for me. Shimano's goretex windblocker have been the best riding specific ones i have found though not the be all end all. I bought a pair of Under Armour windblock ones that work better in the colder days than the shimano's but they are not riding specific and are tight around my wrists, sometimes leading to numbness.

Pogies work to keep the wind away. They can be cumbersome to get hands in and out of quickly on sketchy, icy rides but that is dependent on the size and bulkiness of the gloves. They don't do much for me for insulation past -10C, though, i find.

I had two sets of AME heated mountain bike grips on my commuter and fat bike over the last three seasons and with carbon handle bars inside of pogies, they did an admirable job, especially down to the -25C-30C range. Unfortunately, they are crazy expensive an the on/off switches are terrible. I have had three of them stop workign between the two sets and now i have grips that work with two batteries and no way to turn them on or switch between heat levels. That sucks because i really liked them. AME has had problems with the switches over the years that they have been selling them and keep changing them to try to rectify the problems but that causes incompatibility issues between different model years.

After my heated grips, were relegated to the parts bin, I took a chance on a set of heated gloves on Amazon. Expensive at $170 CDN and have had quite a few commutes and fat bike rides with them and two warm thumbs up so far. Hopefully, I can get through a few winters before they die. They were half of what some of the bigger names were charging for heated gloves so I am happy they are working so far.

I know the OP didn't mention feet specifically but I am on a roll...
Never splurged for mtb specific winter boots as I was not confident that they would work, given the high cost of them. After my experiences with gloves, i am leery that anything from Norhtwave, Shimano, 45North etc would work for me.

I have winter hikers which work well for warmth and off bike hiking/pushing in snow but not the best for pedaling. The tread is too aggressive to work well with flat pedals and don't flex well at the ankle.

I have also tried wool socks, thick, thin, multiples and also neoprene toe covers over the socks. None have been the best.

Heated socks and heated insoles have been the best so far for me. Found a pair of socks on Aliexpress for $50CDn last year and my wife bought me a set of heated insoles this year. Between the two of them, I can regulate my toes very well. I use them in a pair of 5.10's Wet weather/cold weather shoes and that combination is pretty good except in really snowy or icy conditions. The tread is terrible for grip off the pedals. So, to combat, I have a pair of slip on ice spikes that I use for those rides where there is a chance I will need off pedal grip. The spikes can interfere with on pedal grip so I use plastic/nylon flat pedals that mitigate that a bit, not 100% though.

So, if anyone else is like me, e-gloves and e-footwear is the way to go.
 

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So, if anyone else is like me, e-gloves and e-footwear is the way to go.
I also bought the heated insoles off aliexpress, the ones that use a USB plug.

I then source the USB battery pack locally (i.e. Costco) to avoid charging no-name batteries from China in my home....on the advice of others.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Well I'm almost sold on pogies mainly because of the price (very cheap with Chinese options, if they're any good, still be confirmed by someone) and also because no one here said they're not good enough. Seems like they don't need to be that huge also.
Where I live it rarely goes below -10°C and always during the night when I don't commute anyway.
 

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just kicked out 20 miles on road in 35 deg steady wind and rain. used my cheap pogies on road bike and my hands were too warm with PI cyclones, so took gloves off completely. was 100% fine except when taking hands out from pogies....sorta chilly and wet
 

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A good winter glove should have Primalof synthetic insulation. It is the best other than down. Primalof silver or gold won't get damp nor wet during severe physical exercise.
Primalof gold is the best of synthetic. It tends to be expensive but it is worth it when you are stranded in middle of wilderness.



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For a temperature of -20- (-40)C, it is best to take gloves with natural fur or from nature leather. I know MCTi gloves are good for cold, but I have not tested. Here there is a selection of winter men's gloves and their characteristics maybe they write in the description at what temperatures the gloves are embroidered.
No, that's a dumb idea, have you ever tried to ride a bike with ski-gloves? No control. Plus, your fingers tend to sweat rather easily in those types of gloves when you start to exercise hard, as your body will go through wild temperature (heat generating) variations during riding, due to the terrain.

 

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