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www.Braggibikes.com
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I wouldn't think its stiffer then the single crown+Leg arch, specially for a bicycle where weight is a huge factor, in moto seems logic since you have a motor going to push all te weight, even then, they still flex...
 

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Formerly PaintPeelinPbody
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They'll make them all sizes, but 26 and 650b will probably be the same fork (no need for different arches).

29 will have a larger crown.

All will be 100-120mm to replace or run alongside the SID. If the Pike is the go-to Enduro fork (140-160) then the RS1 will be the go-to XC fork.

Now the big question is what will happen in the 160-180mm range...
 

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www.Braggibikes.com
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those are really good arguments. so how they will fight the flex issue? On a 29er bersion?. someone mentioned a system like some of droper post use, but this will take away some of the smooth feeling of the fork I guess. And since it will be XC how they will get a lockout to work with the inverted design?.
And i bet they will produce a inverted DH version of the fork, because I imaguine they dont want to look from the outside while DVO keeps taking over the inverted fork market.
 

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Whether or not the axle diameter is different, it certainly looks like a longer axle with those mounting points on the fork. My guess is this is the patented "predictive steering"
 

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What planet are you from?
A logical one
That fork would not work without using modern carbon technology for the upper and a new hub/axle
An upside down fork is not more stiff by design gram for gram..
it requires more stanchion overlap and a more rigid axle/hub interface to prevent the stanchions from twisting
 

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www.EpicCyclist.com
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245 Posts
A logical one
That fork would not work without using modern carbon technology for the upper and a new hub/axle
An upside down fork is not more stiff by design gram for gram..
it requires more stanchion overlap and a more rigid axle/hub interface to prevent the stanchions from twisting
I agree with this. That's why they where never any good in the past... You cant compare motocross and mountain bikes, totally different. One of the main reasons to go inverted is sprung/unsprung mass, nothing to do with stiffness.
 

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I ride bikes
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Those are really good arguments. so how they will fight the flex issue? On a 29er bersion?. someone mentioned a system like some of droper post use, but this will take away some of the smooth feeling of the fork I guess. And since it will be XC how they will get a lockout to work with the inverted design?.
And i bet they will produce a inverted DH version of the fork, because I imaguine they dont want to look from the outside while DVO keeps taking over the inverted fork market.
It will have a lockout that goes into the crown of the fork.
Inverted forks have a few properties that make them perform better.

1. It reduced unsprung weight by having the lighter parts suspended. This will make it perform better.
2. Less flex near the crown of the fork (where most of the flex actually happens).
 

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I can't pretend to have any insight as to how these or other forks work, but aren't the stanchions much more prone to damage. If so wouldn't that mean servicing the forks more often.
 

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A logical one
That fork would not work without using modern carbon technology for the upper and a new hub/axle
An upside down fork is not more stiff by design gram for gram..
it requires more stanchion overlap and a more rigid axle/hub interface to prevent the stanchions from twisting
A more rigid axle/hub interface than 15mm or 20mm through axles? LOL. I guess we'll see. ;)

Based on the fork analysis that I've seen, the area near the steerer is under the most stress. This type of construction can reinforce that area significantly, and in so, may end up with a stronger fork overall. Ultimately, I'm sure they've done testing and found it to have some merit. It's relatively pointless to debate about this thing until it comes out and gets ridden, but I bet we're going to see a good bit more of them.
 

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Brace yourself for a new hub standard....
Good grief I hope not, even with SRAM's current obsession with making everything proprietary they can't be that optimistic.

If they are, credit to 'em, just throw it on the pile with the all the 24mm, 25mm and 30mm hubs nobody buys anymore. If it's 15x110mm...
 

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If the new hub standard is simply 15x110, then most hubs will be able to fit with adaptors.

RE: stiffness, moto bike axles are pretty small diameter, relatively speaking, and seem to work ok.

It seems like a lot of ideas in the bike industry get a second chance when the engineering and materials catch up.
 
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