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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a Hardrock that came with a Manitou Six fork. Since i´ve been using it for about 2 months now, i haven´t had a problem with the fork. I ride mostly cross-country and i feel that it serves that porpouse well enough, but since i´ve read reviews of this fork that say it is very unreliable, I would like to know wich would be the best fork I could upgrade to?
I´ve read on the specialized website that my frame(size 19) is designed to handle a 100m travel fork, and I´m thinking the Axel that comes with RTWD from 70-100m could be just what I need. I also like the lockout feature it comes with.
But since Í´m new with forks, rode years ago on a bike with no suspension, I would like some advice. :confused:
Thanks
 

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Dood,

Avoid that fork like the plague!

My freind got the same fork on his Jamis Durango, and it does absolutely nothing. Sure it's better than a rigid fork, but not by much.

He upgraded to a MX Comp and has been happier than a pig in SHlT.

I've heard many rumors of Manitau Six forks breaking, but I think thats the old ones.

Buy a Marzocchi MX COMP or a Dropoff 2 and you'll wonder why you ever rode a single day with the SIX.

I've found that the SIX uses up half of it's travel without anyone being on the bike. You have to pull the shock down to fully extend it. Plus it uses rubber bands instead of springs.

Jensonusa has great deals on 04 Marzocchi forks. I have the MX comp ETA and couldn't recomend it any more. It's an awesome do everything fork that gives you full useable travel and is so plush you can never feel it working.


one more thing.....



never buy anything made by Manitou again. Almost everything they sell is of the lowest quality and WAY overpriced.

I don't think a single person would argue with the fact that Marzocchi makes the best and most reliable forks and they are the cheapest. I wouldn't look anywhere else if I were you. Heck just look at the 2004 and 2003 fork reviews. There's a reason just about every Marzocchi fork gets the choice award.

Here's the forks you will want to check out. All of them are great, just find the price range you want:

Marzocchi MXR pro (avoid the MXR COMP, it's not a Marzocchi) around $210
Marzocchi MX COMP around $240
Marzocchi MX COMP w/ ETA aorund $270
Marzocchi Z1 Drop-off 2 around $300

All of the above would easily be sold by Fox, RockShox, or MAnitou for twice the price.

You should buy the MXR PRO if you're on a budget. DOn't let anyone try and sell you the MXR COMP it's not really a MArzocchi fork (terrible).
 

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lot of choices, but don't be too eager to upgrade

If the Six is working trouble free and you are happy with the performance don't be too eager to replace it (especially because other people have had trouble). Some fork designs seem to be more reliable than others, but there is also a lot of personal preference in regards to performance and features such as lock out, travel adjustment, and other adjustments.

I prefer Fox (I ride a TALAS RLC) but have had good experience with Manitou forks in the past. As mentioned Marzocchi makes good forks (they have a loyal following, some good low priced forks, and some good long travel forks), but some people feel they are not keeping up with the current technology trends (like Stable platform, travel adjustment, ect..) when compared to other makers. Other people swear by Rockshox.

Basically, if you don't like your forks performance, feel the added features are something you will use, or don't trust your forks reliability, then go for the upgrade.
I would recommend trying to test a few options out if possible. Talk to your local bike store for suggestions that fit your style and riding conditions. You also need to consider the cost and benefit...i.e. the best fork available in some peoples mind may cost more than your current bike.
 

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Axle, Black, Duke

Bye the way, the Axle is not a bad fork for the price. Sounds like you want a lock out and travel adjustment which it has. A couple other forks to consider which have travel adjustment, but may or may not have the lock out (depends on the model) are the Manitou Black and Rockshox Duke. Both offer travel adjustment and can be found on sale at a price close to the Axle. They also have 30mm uppers which should make them a little more stiff.
 

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ETA is better than lockout.

ETA compresses the fork down and eliminates bobing just like a lockout, but the difference is that ETA allows for another 30mm of travel when it is locked down, so it isn't like riding a ridgid fork. Lockout does just that, it locks the fork into a rigid fork.

ETA is great for dropping the front of the bike down while at the same time keeping some travel. ETA is also very easy to use, just turn a switch 180 degrees and push down.

Another thing is that Marzocchi's ETA is oil controlled and should be more durable and reliable than a mechanical lockout.

I think that anyone who says to buy a RockShox or Manitou either

A. Works for the comapny

or

B. Has never ridden anything better, so have no clue as to what a superior fork feels like.


For the price, nothing beats a Marzocchi in the value department. Stick with the tried and true. Heck the fact that it's made in Itally says it all.
 

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As I said earlier, it boils down to personal preferance. BudhaGoodha very clearly likes Marzocchi. Its not my choice, but that does not matter.

Marzocchi's are good, however there are other good forks out there as well. Base your decsion on reviews, opinions on this board, and most importantly what feels best and works for your application.
 

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I'm going to go directly against BudhaGoodha, who despite is rather eccentric writing style I disagree with about Manitou. I just started to use a Manitou Skareb Elite and the fork is incredible. Plush, stiff, and light. Since you are looking for a 100mm fork, I would suggest you poke around for some of the great closeout deals that can be had on the Manitou Black forks. They are very plush, stiff torsionally, and lighter than the Marzochii forks. Marzochii makes a good quality fork, but they also seem prone to poor build from the factory (continued issues with oil height) and poor customer service (do a search on this one).

BTW, Budha, in case you think I have no clue what I am talking about, this fork replaced a Sid, and my other bike runs a Float 100. I have a pretty good idea what a good fork should feel like. Finally, I don't work in bike industry, and will not until they can pay me more normal bill rate of $250/hr.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Too much travel for bike geometry?

string said:
As I said earlier, it boils down to personal preferance. BudhaGoodha very clearly likes Marzocchi. Its not my choice, but that does not matter.

Marzocchi's are good, however there are other good forks out there as well. Base your decsion on reviews, opinions on this board, and most importantly what feels best and works for your application.
Hey guys, thanks for your advice.

From reviews I kind of assume that both Fox and Marzocchi are the fork brands with more street cred, and there´s gotta be a reason for that.

As I said before I recently bought a bike and the first upgrade i´m doing is getting clip pedals for it. The next upgrade in line would be a nicer fork, but I want to be clear about some doubts I have.

For example would the Marzocchi MX Comp w/ETA be suited for my bike geometry, being that it can be set at more than 100m of travel, wich is the travel sugested for my bike´s frame at specialized website. I have heard that using a fork with more travel that your frame is designed to handle can end up causing the frame to brake, and the warranty for the frame useless.

I would also like to know wich are the advantages/disadvantages to a coil and air fork.

By the way I live in Costa Rica, so the prices I´m gonna have avaible are not gonna be exactly as if lived in USA. Thanks.
 

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OBI-WAN said:
Hey guys, thanks for your advice.

From reviews I kind of assume that both Fox and Marzocchi are the fork brands with more street cred, and there?s gotta be a reason for that.

As I said before I recently bought a bike and the first upgrade i?m doing is getting clip pedals for it. The next upgrade in line would be a nicer fork, but I want to be clear about some doubts I have.

For example would the Marzocchi MX Comp w/ETA be suited for my bike geometry, being that it can be set at more than 100m of travel, wich is the travel sugested for my bike?s frame at specialized website. I have heard that using a fork with more travel that your frame is designed to handle can end up causing the frame to brake, and the warranty for the frame useless.

I would also like to know wich are the advantages/disadvantages to a coil and air fork.

By the way I live in Costa Rica, so the prices I?m gonna have avaible are not gonna be exactly as if lived in USA. Thanks.
Generally speaking, 20mm of added fork travel will slacken the head angle of your bike 1 degree. The slacker head angle will result in more stability downhill but may not feel as responsive uphill and in tight turns. With that said, the difference of only 20mm should not be too dramatic and most riders can adjust pretty quickly. It looks like they do stock 100mm forks on some Hardrocks so I doubt the added travel will be a major problem.

Don't blow off Manitiou. They have some really good forks at some good prices. The higher end Zokes and the Fox forks are very good, but they are also expensive. So are the Manitou's.

I agree with the previous post, check out the Black line. They are a step above the six/Axle forks but are still reasonably priced.

You can always check with specialized regarding the warranty issue. Increasing the travel can void the warranty. I think going to a 125mm fork will likely void the warranty, but the 100mm may not.

Definately get the pedals first. Most riders like them better than flats.
 

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Six is fine

I used the Six for two seasons without any problems whatsoever. I replaced it recently with a Skareb Super and actually missed the simplicity of the coil fork. I haven't ridden with the new fork too much yet but it doesn't seem to have made any difference in what I can and cannot ride, or my level of confidence in riding.

I'd say don't be in a rush to upgrade. If you don't mind the ride too much, wear it out and then replace it.
 

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Hey, I would avoid uprading to the Axel, while, technically, it is an upgrade, its a small one at that. You'll hardly ever use the travel adjustment ( who really does anyways!!). So you're only really gaining Lockout, and a slight damping upgrade ( coil/MCU to fluid flow).
If you feel you need to upgrade, may as well upgrade!..

I;ve ridden alot of forks, and in my opinion, unless you're gonna go the route of a top end marzocchi, I would stay away from them. Rock shox and manitou offer nicer riding forks in lower-mid range forks. Trya rock shox duke, you'll love it. Manitous "black" line is great too.
if you MUST go marzocchi..the mx series is a decent fork, but doesnt feel as nice as the other 2 forks i've mentioned.
Good luck
 

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MX Comp with ETA

Hola OBI-WAN! Yo tambien soy Tico y vivo ahora en Alemania.

Well back to the topic.... I have an MX Comp with ETA and love it, it is no light, but for me it is just what the doctor prescibed: plush, easily adjustable and STIFF... it doesn't flex a bit... well that's my 2 cents.

Saludos,
Cristian
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I realize six could do just fine

precar said:
I used the Six for two seasons without any problems whatsoever. I replaced it recently with a Skareb Super and actually missed the simplicity of the coil fork. I haven't ridden with the new fork too much yet but it doesn't seem to have made any difference in what I can and cannot ride, or my level of confidence in riding.

I'd say don't be in a rush to upgrade. If you don't mind the ride too much, wear it out and then replace it.
The thing is that I wouldn´t like to endup with a broken fork in the near future.

Since I ride x-country I know there´s little chance of that happening, but if it happens I would like to know what fork to buy, or if I get the chance upgradebefore that happens. One thing that I would like to know is:

Does my fork have some kinda warranty?
 

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CDMC said:
I'm going to go directly against BudhaGoodha, who despite is rather eccentric writing style I disagree with about Manitou. I just started to use a Manitou Skareb Elite and the fork is incredible. Plush, stiff, and light. .
I've been riding a Manitou Skareb Platinum on my race bike - it is a phe-no-me-nal fork.

I'd avoid manitou Six's and Axels, but their higher end stuff is great. Their 2005 line just came out, so the 2004;s can be had cheeep.

Marzocchi's are expensive. They never go on sale for a reasonable price. They are good forks (still riding a Z1 X-FLY 100 on one bike after 3 years) but they really don't have a lightweight cross-country fork line anymore, and their good stuff starts at $600.

I don't buy RockShox anymore.
 

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Probably a 1 year warenty on manufacturing defects.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks all

Vulcan said:
Probably a 1 year warenty on manufacturing defects.
You know all the information that people gave me has really helped me a lot.
I´m planning on give the six fork a little more testing time and once I outgrow it, decide on wich fork to invest in, based on your suggestions.
 

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obi-wan needs some spelling tutoring from Yoda

OBI-WAN said:
I recently bought a Hardrock that came with a Manitou Six fork. Since i´ve been using it for about 2 months now, i haven´t had a problem with the fork. I ride mostly cross-country and i feel that it serves that porpouse well enough, but since i´ve read reviews of this fork that say it is very unreliable, I would like to know wich would be the best fork I could upgrade to?
I´ve read on the specialized website that my frame(size 19) is designed to handle a 100m travel fork, and I´m thinking the Axel that comes with RTWD from 70-100m could be just what I need. I also like the lockout feature it comes with.
But since Í´m new with forks, rode years ago on a bike with no suspension, I would like some advice. :confused:
Thanks
use the force dude.
it's "which"
it's "purpose"
don't ask "budha" for help, he can't even spell buddha, let alone Manitou or friend.
 
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