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Went on a long ride this weekend and noticed that 2nd gear was harder to turn than fourth gear. I am not sure what is wrong, but it seems that it hasn't something to do with the first(biggest) cog. Could this be the problem, or what else do you think it is. I serviced my BB and der's two weeks ago. Any advice will help?

thor
 

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one of two possibilities

1. When you serviced your bike, you put your cogset on backwards, so that now the little cog is closest to the spokes and the largest cog is most outboard.
2. More likely, you are seriously confused about your gears, and the relationship between the front chainrings and the rear cogs.
Best thing you can do is locate a gear chart for your wheel size, which I'm guessing is 26". Lacking that, grab a calculator, a pen and a piece of paper, and plot all of your available gears in "gear inches" using this formula:
#front teeth divided by #rear teeth multiplied by wheel diameter (26 in your case). That equals "gear inches."
Higher values are harder. Lower values are easier. For some handy mental benchmarks you can work off of while riding without a calculator in hand: same # of teeth front and rear, regardless of their size, will eaual 1:1 gearing, 26".
The singlespeed "standard" of 2:1 gearing (though most folks actually run lower) is 52".
Once you have a chart for all your gears, you can copy it onto a little piece of tape and stick it on your stem so you always know the exact gear you are in, and the effect of shifting to a different ring and/or cog.
After awhile you'll figure things out and you won't be confused any more.
 
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