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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
 

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Who are the brain police?
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My 1x1 is an all around commuter & light trails ride. Being light, simple and quick are its key elements. It will never have a suspension fork.

However, my 40 lb. trail bike will never see a rigid fork.

If I only had one bike it would have a suspension fork though.
 

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Misfit Psycles
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djcweed said:
I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
lighter, cheaper and more reliable...
 

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no fat chicks
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djcweed said:
I understand the appeal of SSing but cannot fathom why with all the manual and automatic lockout fork options out there that anyone would want to ride a rigid bike. I bought my first mtb before front suspension was available and I put rock shox on it as soon as they came out....enlighten me.
holy crap
i wonder why no one has ever asked that question before
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Locoman said:
My 1x1 is an all around commuter & light trails ride. Being light, simple and quick are its key elements. It will never have a suspension fork.

However, my 40 lb. trail bike will never see a rigid fork.

If I only had one bike it would have a suspension fork though.
I too have many bikes for different purposes. I own an Il Pompino commuter that's rigid and singlespeed for instance. My question is in reference to trail bikes only.
 

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Duckin' Fonuts.
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I have never blown the seals on my rigid fork.
I don't have to change the oil.
The bushings won't ever wear out cause there ain't none.
My rigid fork doesn't dive when I brake before a turn.
The heaviest rigid fork is lighter than the lightest suspension fork.
$180 for a high end rigid vs. $700 for a high end susser.
I like it when my hands go numb through shudder bump sections.
 

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djcweed, If you truly do understand the idea of Single Speeding and being simple than having the rigid fork is in that same thought having no parts to go wrong (of course some of you have broken rigid forks but it is the idea of having less to go wrong). The thought is to eliminate all possible problems, there are obviously a lot more parts to damage (like the lockout you speak highly of...just one more new option to break) on the trail with suspension than a simple rigid fork. I ride suspension up front but am going rigid tonight for these same reasons of less to go wrong. Either way, ENJOY :thumbsup:
 

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The feel, man,,,,,

I love the instant ,precise feel a rigid gives and i have yet to ride a lock-out/sus fork that steers as precise as a rigid.
I also have yet to climb on a locked-out fork that doesnt move a little....
I am also 52 and need the harsh,bone-jarring ride...
 

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Who are the brain police?
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Winter riding is a good reason for riding ridid. When its very cold suspension gets sluggish and sometimes isn't needed as packed snow contours trail features.
 

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I like wheelies
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The steering precision is notable. I have a Fox 100mm on my Racer X and a steel Vicious fork on my SS Bontrager, and there's no comparison.

Having a lighter front end shows itself whenever I need to "snap" the front wheel up/over obstacles.

I think the biggest benefit comes with all of the out of the saddle pedaling. I can't imagine manually locking out a suspension fork every time I get out of the saddle on the SS. A fork with threshold valving won't have this issue of course, but it still lags on the other two points.
 

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Cos they're so perty...

;)



Seriously though, I've just got a set of rigid Dekerf Tuning forks, I've been riding SS for a while now and I'm loving it so much, I thought I'd try going rigid for a while and try and develop some lost bike handling skills.

I'm really enjoying the rigid ride, however my wrists are suffering big time! I don't think there's any harm in swapping between rigid and suspension forks, which is what I'll do for the time being...
 

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The devil is an angel too
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Indeed there is enlightment to be found in understanding the answer to the question. For there are as many reasons why people ride rigid as there are flowers in the spring, yet there is also only one reason why people will ride a rigid bike.
 

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because i like picking lines, its challenging and fun, and when i have a sus fork, i get lazy.

because when i point a rigid bike somewhere, it goes there.

because i ride a redline monocog 29er, and refuse to put a $400 fork on a $500 bike.
 

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Combat Wombat
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Amen brother.

Nonracerrichie said:
I have never blown the seals on my rigid fork.
I don't have to change the oil.
The bushings won't ever wear out cause there ain't none.
My rigid fork doesn't dive when I brake before a turn.
The heaviest rigid fork is lighter than the lightest suspension fork.
$180 for a high end rigid vs. $700 for a high end susser.
I like it when my hands go numb through shudder bump sections.
While I love my FS bike, I also really appreciate the simplicity of a SS with a rigid fork. At this point in my life, riding time is very limited and when the opportunity comes up to get a ride in, I have found that I am not concerned with how fast I can go or what kind of workout I am getting. Its all about how long I get to spend out in the woods just riding and not thinking about the million other things that I have to deal with right now. With a rigid SS, its basically check the tires and I am out the door. And do you know how a SS gives the same old local trails a new twist? A rigid fork adds to that experience.

Brian
 

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Gee, if there were NO benefits to rigid forks, then why don't road bikes have suspension? Roads have bumps too.

Reality: rigid forks are lighter, cheaper, maintenance-free and steer more precisely. Of course they ride rougher (duh), but did you really think you get that smooth ride for free? As with anything else, there are tradeoffs to be made. Do what works for you.
 
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