Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Fair warning; if you watch this video, you may want that 3 minutes of your life back, however for someone who's familar with a GPS, you may find this interesting.
I figured out how to make "routable" trails (turn by turn instructions) on my GPS. Here is an example of Banner Forest.
The two small pictures show the route on my GPS and the turn by turn instructions that are available. Maps look basic, but the actual map is much more detailed as shown in the third picture (below).

 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,746 Posts
Huh?

Isn't that kind of an "anti-mountain bike" move? I thought part of the fun riding was getting "lost" a little and Banner isn't even really "that" big anyways and many trails already have signage.

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm in the post?

What's next, just clipping your bike to a color coded rail and pressing the route you want to ride aka something at Disneyland? ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Borneo said:
Isn't that kind of an "anti-mountain bike" move? I thought part of the fun riding was getting "lost" a little and Banner isn't even really "that" big anyways and many trails already have signage.

Unless I'm missing the sarcasm in the post?

What's next, just clipping your bike to a color coded rail and pressing the route you want to ride aka something at Disneyland? ;)
It's not about Banner, and barely about mountain biking (and the title of the thread was a bit sarcastic). Just having fun with navigation and and creating maps specific to my needs that I can not buy anywhere. The guys who reverse engineered Garmin's maps were in Poland; Garmin was not producing maps for Europe (at the time) so they made their own; then passed along the technology to the rest us. Having a GPS in unfamilar areas is a bit reassuring for me. Most of this is just practice for when that occurs.

I do find it useful when I'm treking through the woods with a chainsaw trying to get to a downed tree by with the straightest possible path independent of trails. I also use it to route through the woods to avoid flooded areas. I can blindly head into the dense underbrush KNOWING the trail is going to be 50-75 feet on the otherside.

Making "routable" maps is actually quite a complex process; the map compiler use to cost $750 for a license; recently it was dropped to $40 and I grabbed it. It's still similar to programming 15-20 years ago using a command line compiler with text files. For me playing with stuff like this IS Disney Land.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Have you checked out switchbacks.com ? Free maps for the Pacific Northwest.. Not routable, but I only use them when I am lost. I also like tracking my route and uploading it to switchbacks since I can contribute to the cause (in the rare case that the route hasn't been mapped or is slightly off)..

Switchbacks also has free topographical maps with trails and roads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
It works!

Switchbacks.com is definitely a cool site (check some of my other posts). I have their maps loaded on one of my profiles. I used them at Port Gamble a couple of weeks ago and I was impressed.

Anyway, a picture is worth a 1000 words as they say. Here's my test run of Newberry with the GPS auto-routing. The brown and yellow tracks are my map. The black track is the actual track I'm currently laying and the purple track is the route that is following my map (non-routable maps won't do this). The text and arrow are telling me to turn right. (The Oregon will let you save the current screen image if you're wondering how I get the picture)

Nice riding today; there was a light layer of snow covering about 80% of the trail surface and it was crunchy (30 degrees), but the traction was really good. After an 1.5 hours my toes did start to feel the temperatures. Good visuals with the snow, sun combination.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Thanks.. I'll pass on the routable maps as I don't get out that way much, and if I do, I will probably only use the GPS if I get lost..

Too bad you can't weight each leg based on difficulty, and/or elevation gain/loss and then have the GPS select it based on what you want (point A to Point B with most elevation gain, or the fastest route, etc.. ) Probably not possible, the only selection of this type I've seen on a GPS are fastest,and shortest, etc.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Randall Fox said:
Thanks.. I'll pass on the routable maps as I don't get out that way much, and if I do, I will probably only use the GPS if I get lost..

Too bad you can't weight each leg based on difficulty, and/or elevation gain/loss and then have the GPS select it based on what you want (point A to Point B with most elevation gain, or the fastest route, etc.. ) Probably not possible, the only selection of this type I've seen on a GPS are fastest,and shortest, etc.

.
You can simulate it a bit by changing the "speed" settings and road class to higher values for the trails you want the GPS to choose over others as you stated above; additionally, you can set a trail section to one-way (steep terrain down only) or set a restriction on it. For example (see pic) both "North Spur" and "Old Timber" have water issues in the winter so I set a restriction on them. Even though the two waypoints are close together the route was computed to go south around the lake using the trails instead of taking the shorter, faster route using either of the service roads.
This gives me good control over trail sections I want to avoid.
 

Attachments

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top