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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few years ago I went on a gruel a thon with some hamerheads. Me and my buddy were dropped and left to find our own way home before dark.

We got out of the mountains just before dark, my exhausted buddy barely made it. I got me thinking what if I had to spend the night? How would I stay warm? Building a fire with wet wood and maintaining it all night is too big a challenge if you are too tired.

I tried splitting wet wood and burning it in a coffee can. It work great and I learned I could dry wet wood once I got a fire going. Best of all a small amount of wood will burn all night. If you heat water and pore it into a bag or bottle you can store some of that heat next to your body.

Two coffee cans one on top of the other works even better, the opening along the side is to reflect heat back to you. Water can be quickly boiled in large quantities including enormous amounts of snow. Rocks placed near the stove will get hot and stay hot for hours.

The simple design works by reflecting all the fires heat back into the wood burning it completely with little smoke and very little ash. It is much safer than a campfire and uses a fraction of the fuel. So when your out of gas you don't have to waste much energy looking for massive amounts of fire wood.

Pics........

1. March 19 2006, riding with some single speed hammer heads, a long day begining.

2. My young riding partner, out of gas, near dark, along way from the car, hammer heads long gone. We are on our own in new country, not very prepared.

3. Heading down Clover Patch an hour of day light left. Glad we didn't have to spend a cold night up there, so it got me thinking what if?

4. Practicing splitting wet wood with a stick hammer and a chisel.

5. My first practice what if camp out, no sleeping bag, trash bags of leaves, hobo stove and hot water. No racks or panniers on my bike. Just the minimum gear for warmth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Practce makes perfect

My friend used to say the seven p's Proper, prior, preperation, prevents, piss, poor, performance.

Good fires take some practice. I was a boy scout, I like to be prepared.

1. Camping on top of Tire mtn in the rain, tarp, no sleeping bag and hobo stove, predrying wet wood.

2. Reviving the flame. I had a bivy sack an a trap shelter.

3. Practicing putting up a tarp shelter, on Clover Patch mtn. Hobo stove burning wet wood.

4. Using old rd tubes to lash the gear on my bike. No racks. Hobo stove on the back, heading to Joe's Peak. Three gears no derrailleurs, no shocks.

5. Latest, best fire starter, parrifin wax melted onto dryer lint. Double stove on a pie plate. Latest technology.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
More stove pics

Pix.......

1. Fast cutting pocket saw and my chisel split wet wood for my stove.

2. Practicing with a campfire to show how much more fuel is used, rainy day.

3. Tiny amount of wood doing the same job better.

4. Practice solo on top of Mt June, no bag, no tent.

5. Making jiffy pop on our car camping hobo stove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My gift to mankind, the hobo stove.

I take on on every ride and hide them in my favorite places. The new double burns better and hotter with less fuss. Cooking meat sacks and heating cans of soup are my specialty.

Recently some riders spent a cold night out lost, they started a fire with a styrofoam helmet. I bet they were glad to have a fire.

Too bad I can't get rich selling hobo stoves, they sure have improved my outdoor experience.

Pix...........

1. Burning pallet wood. We had enough wood for two nights. It made our nights funner.

2. Burning wet wood along Fall Creek in the new double.

3. Tring aluminum beer bottles for a water pot, easier to carry, Joe's peak solo.

4. My crappy double,recylcled cans from the can stove pipe failure. Anything works.

5. My best non collapsible double, still at eagle rock.
 

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Making fat cool since '71
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An instructor showed us a suspiciously similar device during outdoor survival/worst case scenario classes (circa 1992). He didn't call it the hobo stove of course; he wasn't given to quaintness. He kindly called it the: you screwed up...now what? stove. One or two coffee cans, white gas cans, etc. I've seen those TV survivalist/evangelists show similar things in the last couple of years. Try 8K feet, in February, a 120" snowpack, with one match, what you are wearing, overly dramatic partners that can't focus, a map, a compass and the mercury dropping you faster than those X-men. Ah, the good old days...

Brock...

PS: that's when I realized: there's no fabric like wool, there is no fabric like wool.
 

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You didn't invent the hobo stove but you definitely did a fine job of incorporating it into mountainbiking.
I'm currently trying to figure out how to mount my hobo-hooka to my frame. I may have to nix the hobo-margaritarator to make room. I suppose it could buy the smaller version margaritarator and I can just store it in the hobo-wet bar.

MeatSacks!

Caz
 

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ImaKlyde said:
Try 8K feet, in February, a 120" snowpack, with one match, what you are wearing, overly dramatic partners that can't focus, a map, a compass and the mercury dropping you faster than those X-men.
In those conditions I'm pretty sure I'd just give up and die.
 

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Miserable Jerks?

Sparticus said:
I've seen those miserable hammerheads around, those guys are some real jerks.

Davey........I couldn't agree more. Let's find 'em and kick their [email protected]'s!!

(That was a damn fun ride, actually. Point to Point, Lowell to the TrailHead Cafe!)

Nice Pics, Lef-T. I love the exploration-style of riding.
Nice to actually see some things on a ride every once in a while!
 

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Alzhiemer's?

Tin, aluminum have yall not seen the research that these practices? don't they all point to alzhiemer's disease? Is this not why years ago in high school they told you not to smoke your leaf in a pop can? Well at least you will be in shape when you forget all of these great memories...???
 

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power2thepedal said:
Tin, aluminum have yall not seen the research that these practices? don't they all point to alzhiemer's disease? Is this not why years ago in high school they told you not to smoke your leaf in a pop can? Well at least you will be in shape when you forget all of these great memories...???
I'm not so sure that hobos are too concerned about getting Alzhiemer's.

Caz
 

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Miserable Jerks! Tad, did you find those jerks?

I just remember conversing on that ride, "he's in gym shorts, and running shoes. But, he's also with Left-T. They'll be fine, and they'll find their way. Left-T knows the way."
So we shoved on, up School Creek, to Winberry Divide.

I recall we fed Left-T and the youngun' some beers as we were awaiting their arrival at the TrailHead. We were all very happy to see they made it! What a day to remember!

Caz, when you get that Hobo Hooka working, you'd better gather us round for your pow wow~

SSconny
 
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