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what about saving weight for the bike.......i prefer be focused on FUN and pleasure being in the nature sometimes with friends....on a honest bike.....
 

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I think racer types tend to be very concerned about weight because their physiology tends to be at a point where it's not exactly easy to lose body weight. This is the "last few pounds" issue in dieting, but there's also the problem where it's extremely hard to simultaneously lose weight and also get stronger/faster. And, the lines at the port-o-potty at races suggest that the dieting technique of taking a dump has also been discovered.

Losing the forest for the trees is, in general, a bad thing. Be it fixating on weight, suspension, geometry, traction, etc.
This is exactly how I feel on this.

It makes the most sense to me if you're already in your peak physical form. Because losing weight off of the bike (if you care about time reductions) is really the only way to improve. This is why its a huge thing at cross country world cups.

If you're not able to drop your own weight further (for any reason, health, limited time to exercise, already in great shape/whatever), and have the cash, then I can see the desire to reduce the total power output on climbs.
 

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I had a thought last night that applies to this topic. I've been mountain biking for a very long time and have seen bikes get heavier over the years. However, the trails and type of riding have also changed a lot. Back in the day, you'd ride a light bike on what was pretty much hiking trails at slower speeds. Now with dedicated MTB trails, the speeds and steepness of the trails are much greater. People now are hitting big jumps and slamming down steep slopes on their bikes that were unthinkable in the past.

Of course all this causes a much greater stress on the bike to handle what amounts to near motocross impacts. So new bikes need to be heavier to handle this greater stress. I highly doubt that one of the bikes that I used to ride could stand up very well to the trails and impacts that I'm doing these days.
 

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it could be.......but aluminium and carbon bikes are weaker in terms of resistance in front of a good steel bike of the past...
 

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it could be.......but aluminium and carbon bikes are weaker in terms of resistance in front of a good steel bike of the past...
That's a pretty broad statement.
 
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I had a thought last night that applies to this topic. I've been mountain biking for a very long time and have seen bikes get heavier over the years. However, the trails and type of riding have also changed a lot. Back in the day, you'd ride a light bike on what was pretty much hiking trails at slower speeds. Now with dedicated MTB trails, the speeds and steepness of the trails are much greater. People now are hitting big jumps and slamming down steep slopes on their bikes that were unthinkable in the past.

Of course all this causes a much greater stress on the bike to handle what amounts to near motocross impacts. So new bikes need to be heavier to handle this greater stress. I highly doubt that one of the bikes that I used to ride could stand up very well to the trails and impacts that I'm doing these days.
That's probably the best explanation. Even smooth jump lines put way more load on a modern bike compared to what a typical 90s mtb went through. Force drastically increases with velocity and speeds are consistently higher than they used to be due to trail design, bike design and better riders.

There are some gnarly rocky downhills that I hit just as fast or a little faster than I would on a motocross bike. In some cases there's just to much mass on a dirtbike compared to what you can skip over on a mtb. Riding harescramble trails average speeds could be as low as 10 or 12mph.

I'll continue riding my nice 34lbs enduro bike everywhere which hasn't had a single failure in 1200 miles so far. Same can't be said about my last 30lbs trail bike that I broke three times in a row going to a downhill park and the frame cracked around 1500 miles.
 

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Just want to point out that this discussion being framed around climbing speed, efficiency, racing, etc is very much an MTB type discussion. It's not uncommon for freestyle bmx riders to pick tires based on weight or to run 18" tubes or tubolitos to save weight at the wheels. I'd say very few are 'obsessed' with weight but they recognize it affects your ability to bunny hop, spin, etc. If you ride dynamically at all, weight has some importance.
 

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Just want to point out that this discussion being framed around climbing speed, efficiency, racing, etc is very much an MTB type discussion. It's not uncommon for freestyle bmx riders to pick tires based on weight or to run 18" tubes or tubolitos to save weight at the wheels. I'd say very few are 'obsessed' with weight but they recognize it affects your ability to bunny hop, spin, etc. If you ride dynamically at all, weight has some importance.



Wut? All the freestyle bmx bikes I've worked on are absolute tanks, you could hammer nails with those frames. Saving 10 grams by using an 18" tube instead of a 20" one seems inconsequential.
 

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Just want to point out that this discussion being framed around climbing speed, efficiency, racing, etc is very much an MTB type discussion. It's not uncommon for freestyle bmx riders to pick tires based on weight or to run 18" tubes or tubolitos to save weight at the wheels. I'd say very few are 'obsessed' with weight but they recognize it affects your ability to bunny hop, spin, etc. If you ride dynamically at all, weight has some importance.
Depends on what they're doing. My BMX bike was a tank and it was great for casual dirt jump lines. If you're doing tail whips and spins lighter is probably better but even pro bikes are pretty heavy.
 

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Depends on what they're doing. My BMX bike was a tank and it was great for casual dirt jump lines. If you're doing tail whips and spins lighter is probably better but even pro bikes are pretty heavy.
The midschool bikes were much heavier. Bikes now are anywhere between 23-30 lbs. Regardless, my point is that even guys who don't have to worry about climbing still consider weight to some degree.
 

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Even smooth jump lines put way more load on a modern bike compared to what a typical 90s mtb went through.
Didn't we all "Huck to flat" in the 90s? Was it just me? :D

Because I broke pretty much everything on my mountain bike being an idiot in the early 90s.
 

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If I had ridden those 1990s bikes in the old-man fashion I ride now, they probably would have been fine.

Eventually I bought a BMX too around '97 and stopped breaking my MTB. Mostly.
 

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The midschool bikes were much heavier. Bikes now are anywhere between 23-30 lbs. Regardless, my point is that even guys who don't have to worry about climbing still consider weight to some degree.
I have a 1999 freestyle BMX bike from when I was a kid (Haro Cozmo). And you are right, it is incredibly heavy, with 1/2" axles, and 3/8in dropouts, and 48 spoke wheels.

I know guys like Brandon Semenuk run a really light bike, and that at least one of those top slopestyle guys worked with WAO to build their first 26" carbon slopestyle rim. Because yes, when you're worried about if you'll be able to rotate a bike around enough times for a 1080 tailwhip or whatever, it does totally make a difference.

That said, at this point in my life, I'm more likely to ride an enduro or XC race than I am become a slopestyle/freestyle BMX competitor :).
 

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1. Lift to car rack
2. Car rack weight limitations
3. Aircompanies limmitation on luggage
4. It is easy to spin around in case you do some of this
5. Similar to feeling when length compared
 

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I love XC bikes, so naturally for me the lighter it is without compromising durability is top priority. I wouldn't call myself a weight weenie. More of a weight conscious bike rider.
 
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