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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw a thread similar to this on the Transition forum...and it got me thinking.

Why is it I (and judging by the forums, most bikers) constantly think I need a newer, better bike?

I've gone through hardtails, Single speed, SS 29er's, DH full sus Kona Stinky, and now have a 2006 Kona Dawg Primo, that, up until 2 weekends ago, I really liked, and thought "ya, this is the bike for me!" I went to Whistler for the first time, saw all the Big Rigs, and after riding for the day, and doing pretty well I thought...decided on the drive home, hmmm....maybe something "in between" the Stinky and the Dawg. 20mm axle, longer travel, slacker geometry...that would be SO much better!!!

So, I've since spent hours on the soul-sucking internet looking at bikes, and thinking of upgrades, new frames, totally new bikes...only to go for a good old fashioned North Shore trail ride Sunday and realize...you know, the Dawg is actually a great all-round bike!

I'm sure I'm not the only one out there who goes through this, and perhaps there are some out there with Psychology degrees that can analyze this phenomenon. I'd be interested to hear other thoughts.

Now...what is going to happen when my new custom steel road frame that I've waited 4 months for arrives in September....I'm getting nervous already!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
technology is great, but...

dogonfr said:
All very true but technology is hard to resist. I would highly recommend a 20mm FR axle though. :cornut:
It's not the be-al-end-all...probably more-so in mountain biking than road, with suspension advancements.

But when the guy at the LBS tells me that I really shouldn't put that old 9 speed Dura Ace crank on my new road frame! It's old technology! My reply is "it was good enough for Lance 3 years ago...it's good enough for me now"

Sometimes, technology is just a money grab.
 

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ride hard take risks
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Johnny LaRoux said:
It's not the be-al-end-all...probably more-so in mountain biking than road, with suspension advancements.

But when the guy at the LBS tells me that I really shouldn't put that old 9 speed Dura Ace crank on my new road frame! It's old technology! My reply is "it was good enough for Lance 3 years ago...it's good enough for me now"

Sometimes, technology is just a money grab.
And your not Lance. :D
 

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Maybe because you don't have the difference(s) between need vs. want figured out, not at a point in life where what you do vs. what you have creates the most value???? Maybe because prior purchases were not made well even if you know you're in the realm of want vs. need???

Good luck.
 

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The manufacturers certainly keep the interest up by changing things a little every year without ever changing anything in a substantial way. Giant for example came out with a composite hardtail frame in the late 90's and then went to the XTC aluminum. In 2004 they introduced a carbon rear triangle. Then in 2005 a composite hardtail. In 2007 it was dropped and they introduced the new "improved" XTC Alliance with the carbon rear triangle again. I was looking on Ebay recently and the new "improved" Alliance frame sold for more than $800 whereas a year older composite is lucky to get $400. Does that make any sense? It makes sense because everyone thinks newer is better.
 

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because you know what they say about the grass...

i have ridden dozens and owned over a dozen bikes, and i'll say thus, steel is still real.

the majority of aluminum bikes i have owned, did not live up to the test of time. not to say that others have made theirs last, i still own the 2 most love steelies, one of them now for about 15 years. for my long term rides that i never lose love for, these bikes'll always stay in my stable. that being said, i have bought a few aluminum fullies, and liked riding them, and i've owned other hardtails, aluminum and carbon included, and i liked them alot. and now i'm looking at getting a steel road bike, because i'm not worried about winning the tour this year.
 

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That roadie in your way
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I hear you. I ride mainly on the road and race at the velodrome. After a lot of bike lust, I came to the understanding that $5k bike won't yield much in terms of speed than my $1k bike.

I ride my MTB on trails maybe once a month in the summer and a couple times a week come fall. I've been fighting off MTB lust for a while now and I think my trail ride on Sunday helped. Why blow more cash on another bike just to suck on the trails? Sure the new bike would be lighter, have better geo, components, etc but I'll still stumble over the same obstacles and struggle over the same hills.

But now, here I am at work, cruising MTBR, wondering if a new bike can make up for my shortcomings! ;)
 

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I resist the allure of new technology. Proprietary stuff blows!

Remember, the bike is only as good as the rider and unless you're doing DH or AM or something, the bike doesn't make a huge difference.

If Tiger Woods played golf w/ cheapo clubs he'd still be a great golfer.

I'm not a great rider myself but I LOVE passing people riding new equipment while I ride my 18 yr-old full rigid HT.
 

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I always brake check myself when I get deep into bike lust by remembering that it isn't more bike stuff that makes me happy, it is the experience of riding the bike that makes me happy. When I keep that in mind, I have a much easier time understanding what I actually need versus what is simply a shiny thing.
 

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After some review, many XC racer types find it to be an ok decision economically to buy a new bike every year. You can sell a bike that is less than a year old for a decent price, and never have to worry about replacing a ton of expensive components because they wore out.

Personally, I have not purchased a new, complete mountain bike, (or built up a frame with new components) since 2002. I find the small purchases easier to swallow than coughing up $3000 for a new bike.
 

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I am a firm believer in new products, possibly because I am a bit of a perfectionist always looking to iron out every little problem with things and make the ride better. If buying new things like bikes is worth it to you then what is the problem, bikes aren't as bad as many other things for the environment and I love the look on other riders faces seeing your new kit it also keeps your interest when if I was riding an old bike I may loose interest because performance was so low.

N being the number of bike you have at the mo and 1 being the bike you want I like WMB's little formula for the amount of bikes you should own:

N+1
 

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For me it is parts, I can't afford to get a whole new bike. I also love changing the feel and ride of my bikes, and I love to have some kind of project on the go. For me finding, selling, upgrading, downgrading and working on bikes is all part of the experience.
 

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borregokid said:
The manufacturers certainly keep the interest up by changing things a little every year without ever changing anything in a substantial way. Giant for example came out with a composite hardtail frame in the late 90's and then went to the XTC aluminum. In 2004 they introduced a carbon rear triangle. Then in 2005 a composite hardtail. In 2007 it was dropped and they introduced the new "improved" XTC Alliance with the carbon rear triangle again. I was looking on Ebay recently and the new "improved" Alliance frame sold for more than $800 whereas a year older composite is lucky to get $400. Does that make any sense? It makes sense because everyone thinks newer is better.
Sadly, bikes deteriorate fast...

Also, when it comes to secondhand, people assume that one model year older equals one more year of being abused on the trails - it doesnt always, but its often assumed.
 

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Sorry, but bike's RESALE VALUE deteriorates fast; the bike can last for years! Witness the classic steel '10-speeds' still rolling today. Or the 6061 hardtail frame I've rebuilt 3-4 times over almost 8 years.

The "need" is close to the 'grass is greener' theory; what it really is, is an idealization of what we want the perfect bike to be. As we change & grow (sometimes just OLDER), our ideal changes, as well.

I'll use myself as an example -- my first 'real' bike in the new millennium was an AL URT Mongoose, 'bout $400 new; got it used for $75, rode it for a year, and gave it to my sister when I got the 6061 HT. It's been through components, three forks, winter riding, a cruiser conversion, and nearly another rebuild before other things interfered. Between builds, I rode a Motobecane FS (POS), a Weyless single-pivot (decent, still have), and my present Jamis Dakar XLT.

All have one thing in common -- the quest for the perfect ride. You think the next one, created in your head, will be the one, and it always comes a little closer. But it's not quite there.

I'm looking around again for another HT frame, one that's disc-ready....
 

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The rule I always try to apply is "am I really riding this bike at its limit?" if not, the there is room for me to improve without buying anything new. That said I just bought an older Rocky Mountain Hammer to turn into a SS. So the rule does not apply to a bike that is different that those that I currently have :thumbsup:
 
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