Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 97 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm in the market for a chain wear indicator. Park has two chain checkers - the CC-2 ($20) and the CC-3 ($10). What are the advantages of each. To my unlearned eye the cheaper one would appear to be simpler and perhaps better. Anybody know the pros and cons of each - and are there other alternative that you recommend?

The difference in price will not be the deciding factor.

Regards,
Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,114 Posts
mbabaracus said:
I'm in the market for a chain wear indicator. Park has two chain checkers - the CC-2 ($20) and the CC-3 ($10). What are the advantages of each. To my unlearned eye the cheaper one would appear to be simpler and perhaps better. Anybody know the pros and cons of each - and are there other alternative that you recommend?

The difference in price will not be the deciding factor.

Regards,
Brian
I like using the CC-2 because i can gauge chain stretch as the chain wears and plan ahead. For me once the chain reaches .85 it only takes 2 weeks to go over 1.0 and break so i replace the chain between .75-.85 .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Two great tools

Two great tools you should consider adding to your collection:

The Roloff Caliber 2

An excellent chain-wear tool. Simple, accurate, no moving parts.

For your cassette Roloff makes HG-IG-Check
Though designed for shimano cassettes you can use it on an any cassette, cog, or chainring to get an accurate gauge of drivetrain wear.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What is the procedure for using a ruler?

hollister said:
good old fashoned ruler,and good set of eyecrometers:thumbsup:
Pardon my ignorance. How many links should measure exactly how long? My drivetrains are all shimano 9 speed.

Regards,
Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts

·
velocipede technician
Joined
·
8,877 Posts
mbabaracus said:
Pardon my ignorance. How many links should measure exactly how long? My drivetrains are all shimano 9 speed.

Regards,
Brian
line up zero to the center of a chain pin,another pin should fall dead center at 12".anything over that and its stretched,depending on how much its stretched means either replaceing the chain or the chain,cassette,and chainrings.
if it is stretched its time to make a visual inspection of your c-rings(if the teeth look like shark fins its time to replace)most people tend to wear out their middle rings first,and two or three of their cassette cogs.if a customer has worn out their small ring as well,ill recomend a full drivetrain replacement:madman: .(another reason to ride a single speed:D )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Rohloff cassette wear indicator tool

Phil said:
excellent tool, they don't get any better than this.

i didn't know Roloff made this. just added it to my wish list...
Yuppers, it's an excellent tool, although you could probably make one yourself using five or six links of new chain.

It works by applying tension to the chain - using the last link you attempt to lower it over a tooth on the cassette, if it hangs up your cassette is worn and should be replaced.
 

Attachments

·
Can Tree Member
Joined
·
847 Posts
Yuppers, it's an excellent tool, although you could probably make one yourself using five or six links of new chain.
Or you could just crunch up a hill, if you live close to one. That's all I do. But if you can't road-test the cassette conveniently, the cassette wear gauge could save a ride. The cassette may work fine on the flats but could still skip under load, and it would be a bummer to figure that out a couple of miles from the trailhead.
 

·
A wheelist
Joined
·
5,991 Posts
mbabaracus said:
I'm in the market for a chain wear indicator. Park has two chain checkers - the CC-2 ($20) and the CC-3 ($10). What are the advantages of each. To my unlearned eye the cheaper one would appear to be simpler and perhaps better. Anybody know the pros and cons of each - and are there other alternative that you recommend?
As any chain wear measurement is magnified over a larger distance, or measurement, the greater the measurment we can take, the more accurate that chain wear measurement.

All chain wear gauges (that I'm aware of) measure over a small distance of about 4-5".

I have two ways of measuring chain wear, depending on whether the chain is on the bike or off the bike. The first one, on my chainpages, takes a reading over a distance of 12". My other measurer is a 4' piece of steel tape suspended from a nail - the same nail from which I hang the chain. This then magnifies the wear 4x the amount over my 12" tape - or about 12x the amount over a store bought unit. I have a whole $1 invested.

I have checked both of my steel tape gauges against a store-bought chain wear indicator and the difference in accuracy is staggering.
 

·
Derailleurless
Joined
·
9,122 Posts
Mike T. said:
I have checked both of my steel tape gauges against a store-bought chain wear indicator and the difference in accuracy is staggering.
I own a Rohloff chain checker, but it (like either of the Park units) are only good for quick, initial readings. The fact of the matter is that any of these Rohloff or Park units will give you an early false positive.

The 12" ruler method Mike describes is as close as you can some to certainty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
440 Posts
Wipperman chain checker seems to have longest measurement span - so long that it is actually bit hard to use on some FS frames.
See if you can navigate to it at http://www.connexchain.com/ ->products -> accessories, it's one of those stupid Macromedia Flash player pages from h3ll.
I've been using for couple of years and like it. Of course ruler method is most accurate but it's nice to have chain checker around for quick checks.
 

·
Can Tree Member
Joined
·
847 Posts
markom said:
Wipperman chain checker seems to have longest measurement span - so long that it is actually bit hard to use on some FS frames.
See if you can navigate to it at http://www.connexchain.com/ ->products -> accessories, it's one of those stupid Macromedia Flash player pages from h3ll.
I've been using for couple of years and like it. Of course ruler method is most accurate but it's nice to have chain checker around for quick checks.
Somewhat on topic...does anyone have a good source for either the CC-2 or the Wipperman tool? Having been motivated by this thread (and the recent destruction of $200 of Campy gear due to my own negligence in not watching the chain closer) I was oh-so-close to the impluse purchase from an un-named bike discounter (google Park CC-2 and see which one comes up). The $6.50 shipping and handling was expensive but expected. But they tossed in $1.50 for "insurance"? Shouldn't that have been "extra margin, because we were were just kidding about the price"? Small nut, but with the CA sales tax added in this was going to be a $34 purchase for a $24 item.

I bailed.

Perhaps foolishly, considering the cost of the parts that I recently torched. But it still felt good. Now I just have to figure out how to unsubscribe from their mailing list. And find an LBS who will get it for me--they deserve this bit of business.

Oh...I guess that was a rant. Wrong board, too. Sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I bought a spin doctor chain checker at performance for $4. It works the same way as the Park cc-3, but costs 50% less!!. It measures .75% and 1% wear. To preserve the rings and cassette I replace my chain after .75% but before 1%, which is in line with Sheldon Brown's recommendation.

edit: I was looking for it on performance's website but could not find it. I got it at the store just to clarify.
 

·
All Mt, DH
Joined
·
488 Posts
Originally bought Park CC-2, but later sold it on Ebay.
Now I have the CC-3 which is simple, cheaper and much better.

My main concern with the CC-2 was the pins in the tool always looked bent and it wasnt reassuring..... the CC-3 is dead easy
 
1 - 20 of 97 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top