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TonyTheTiger said:
I'm looking to buy a toruqe wrench. Any reccomendations on size, brand, or anything else to look for?
Its hard to beat the basic park 3/8" model in in/#'s.

I have looked into a few of the automatic "click" types, but never could find one in in/#'s that was in a useful range for bike work. The ones I could find were in ft/#'s and I didnt want to get into converting all the time.

So I stick with the Park version 3/8", nothing fancy but works really good for the times I use it.
 

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Pedro's also has a click-type

The craftsman one above looks like it will work at 25 in/lb minimum (only one or two components, such as avid gripshift, are below that spec) and it goes to a respectable 250 in/lb.

However, it looks big, which could make it cumbersome.

Pedros has a 1/4" drive click type that is smaller, and runs from 20 to 200 in/lb.

For the really big jobs, like crank bolts, etc, neither of these will work as you are getting in the 300+ in/lb range. However, I don't think anything can go that little and that big at the same time.

200 in/lb is just over 16 ft/lbs, so get a "normal" ft/lb torque wrench (I think the craftsman click type is ~80 for 10 to 75 ft/lb) if you want something for the big jobs. If you really want something in in/lbs that goes that big, Snap-On makes a 200 to 1000 in/lb click type for some serious money (~215); more accurate, but I don't think your crank bolts really care if they are at 305 or 310 in/lbs.

I think Enduro seals sells a BB socket for outboard bearings if you want everything to be up to spec...
 

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Park vs Craftsman

I wnet through the old fashion park beam style vs the coll craftsman click style debate myself. Could never figure out how the park has a a range of....

"The TW-2 is 3/8" drive and ranges from -600 inch pounds"

and typical craftsman or other in/# torque wrench with the click type has a range of....

"3/8 in. square drive Wrench measures 25 to 250 in. lbs. in 1 in. lb. increments."

The problem ends up being the typical crank bolt requires a torque value of....

Crank bolt (305-391)
Chainring cassette to crankarm (443-620)
Pedal into crank (307 minimum)
Shimano® Hollowtech II (305-435)

Those are from the park web site, I could get more. A top value of 250 in/# isnt the end all, as torque wrenchs are for mostly bottom bracket and crank arm stuff. I have always though that for 0-250 in/# one of those torque screw drivers would work perfect with 1/4" allen bits. But wouldnt be good for crank bolts.

Id love to find a click type torque wrench in the 0-600in/# range under $100. But the closest I have been able to find is like $300 and the thing is huge.

For like $30, the park beam type is a bargin and has a good working range. A while back someone on ebay was selling in/# beam torque wrenchs for under $20. Just like the parks without the label.
 

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mx_599 said:
huh? seems like you are over complicating matters. buy two craftsman T-wrenches and cover the gamut. one inch*pounds the other foot*pounds. get socket adapters if needed
But if your getting a torque wrench for primarily bike repair, whats the point of spending at least $100 for two wrenches, one of which you have to convert in/#'s to ft/#'s every time you use it. When the $30 park one does it all. I can honestly say that other than stem bolts, I only use a torque wrench on bottom bracket/crank arm stuff and all that stuff is over 300in/#'s.

You would think craftsman or other tool companies would be a better place to buy a torque wrench, but if you need it for bike repair park's torque wrench has the best range to do it all. Its just not as cool as the $75 and over wrenches out there.
 

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spepic said:
But if your getting a torque wrench for primarily bike repair, whats the point of spending at least $100 for two wrenches, one of which you have to convert in/#'s to ft/#'s every time you use it. When the $30 park one does it all. I can honestly say that other than stem bolts, I only use a torque wrench on bottom bracket/crank arm stuff and all that stuff is over 300in/#'s.

You would think craftsman or other tool companies would be a better place to buy a torque wrench, but if you need it for bike repair park's torque wrench has the best range to do it all. Its just not as cool as the $75 and over wrenches out there.
i agree :)

...but above you started talking about 300 dollar wrenches. two craftsman don't cost 300.

i doubt the all encompassing park one would be as accurate with that kind of range, but its not like you're wrenching on NASA equipment either :thumbsup:
 

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say when its 25-250 it will be more accurate, but if its 0-600 then it will be less accurate in the middle and more accurate in the ends, learned this in shop last week so I know all about it. If you want a super nice one get the "click" torque wrench, but if your only useing it a few times, get the bar torque wrench, saves ya money
 

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I mainly use my torque wrench when working with my disc brake components, e.g. caliper mounting or rotor mounting bolts. I guaranty that you won't be happy if you get too tight happy and strip the bolts out of your hubs.

On a side note, I do have a few craftsman torque wrenches, mainly because as I mentioned I also work on my own Jeep & Cars. They cover any range that i'll ever need. Not a big deal.

Since we're on the subject of torque, here's some specs that I compiled if you guys need it. Just for guidance, your mileage may vary :)

http://www.pedaldamnit.com/mtb/?page_id=56
 

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I have snap-on torque wrenches from my working days, expensive yet very good tools. The 3/8 drive goes down to 3ft lbs, converting is not that difficult, just multiply by 12. However, I seldom use a click type for bike work, preferring to watch the torque build on a beam . My beam type goes from zero to 600 inch pounds, and will read both left and right, something most clicks will not do.
High dollar bottom bracket and high dollar frame and left hand threads?
Get a good beam for the price of a cheap clicker.
 

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my 2 cents

Flat bar dual beam are the most accurate and dependable,
round bar dual beam second best, they can read radial load, so there may be user error.
Both of these often have ft-lbs and Nm or in-lbs and Nm on scale

Dial is second in accuracy and dependability, will need to be calibrated from time to time. And is the most repeatable of all torque wrenches. This is usually considered the best type of wrench to get in the measurement industry
Dail may have 3 or 4 scales on one tool so conversions are sometimes not needed.

micro-(clicker) type are last in accuracy and dependabiltity. will also need calibrated from time to time. these are also very bad about user error, at low ranges below 100 in-lbs you may not feel or hear the click, you also must apply pressure slow to get accurate reading, and you need to turn gauge back to 0 and back up setting being used between each time you. The tool also has a hard time measuring small torques. These are very good tools for the automotive industry, very accurate if you follow procedure at high torques, crappy tools for the bike industry where you use low torques, and most mechanics dont know the correct procedure anyway.

All types are only accurate in there middle 2/3 of there range, you really need 2 tools for a bike, at least in a shop. at home you can get by with one, unless you are using it on carbon bars/stems which may have a torque of 6.4Nm in which case you will need two.

So the round bar dual beam ( second best ) like the park, etc. is very good. the flat bar dual beam is alot more expensive the clicker type last place, and the sears is very cheap to begin with I would not use on a bike, but would gladly buy it to work on my car.

To get good info on the subject check out some of the manufactures websites, they make the stuff and will say what I just said, I suggest strutevant richmont considered the best torque wrenches made or CDI used buy the tons in automotive industry also the same company that makes snap-on and some of the other brands. they both have good info on there sites. For my bike shop I use 3 differend wrenches all dials to get a full and sccurate range.

Sam
www.pelotoncyclery.com
 
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