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SPECIALizED
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info. I'm planning on replacing my RD as well. If I were to go the 10spd route would I need to replace my crankset as well? It's a 22/36/bash SLX. I'd love to have the 36 in the rear to help get my sled up the hill.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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XT or XTR. Might be a tad difficult finding a 9 speed XTR cassette.

Or you can go with the SRam PG980 or 990 cassette.
980 only has the largest three cogs, same as the OP's current SLX...you will still get notching in the middle 3 gears. The XT, XTR, and 990 puts the largest six cogs on carriers.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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Thanks for the info. I'm planning on replacing my RD as well. If I were to go the 10spd route would I need to replace my crankset as well? It's a 22/36/bash SLX. I'd love to have the 36 in the rear to help get my sled up the hill.
No, a 10 speed chain works fine on 9 speed cranksets.
 

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Spanish rider
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I wouldn't recommend xt or xtr cassetes.

High end cassetes (XT, XTR) generally come with several independent cogs and spacers, so the torque is driven to the freehub by a single cog, which is exactly the reason you get those marks on the freehub.

I'd recommend something with several cogs riveted together (generally lower end and heavier cassetes), properly tightened.

However yo'ure always going to get some deformation marks on an alluminium freehub, so don't bother... :rolleyes:
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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I wouldn't recommend xt or xtr cassetes.

High end cassetes (XT, XTR) generally come with several independent cogs and spacers, so the torque is driven to the freehub by a single cog, which is exactly the reason you get those marks on the freehub.

I'd recommend something with several cogs riveted together (generally lower end and heavier cassetes), properly tightened.

However yo'ure always going to get some deformation marks on an alluminium freehub, so don't bother... :rolleyes:
Umm...you are SO WRONG on this:nono::nono::nono:
 

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SPECIALizED
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I will have to agree with mtnbiker72. The cassette I have an there now has an aluminum carrier for the lowest 3 gears and that part of the hub is good. So as long as the XT/XTR has a carrier for the first and second sets of gears then I should be fine.
 

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Never trust a fart
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I wouldn't recommend xt or xtr cassetes.

High end cassetes (XT, XTR) generally come with several independent cogs and spacers, so the torque is driven to the freehub by a single cog, which is exactly the reason you get those marks on the freehub.

I'd recommend something with several cogs riveted together (generally lower end and heavier cassetes), properly tightened.

However yo'ure always going to get some deformation marks on an alluminium freehub, so don't bother... :rolleyes:
When there are multiple cogs attached to a single spider, it spreads the load over a wider area. Individual cogs, regardless if they are separate or riveted together, are still separate, and will have smaller load points.

So try again.
 

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I will have to agree with mtnbiker72. The cassette I have an there now has an aluminum carrier for the lowest 3 gears and that part of the hub is good. So as long as the XT/XTR has a carrier for the first and second sets of gears then I should be fine.
XT and XTR cassettes have the 6 largest cogs mounted on spiders. The smallest cogs can still mar the freehub but they are much less likely to do damage of any significance
 

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I just got and mounted up the HG80 cassette. Only the 3 lowest gears are on a common spider, all others are separate. However when you torque the lock nut down, they get really slammed together. I would imagine friction between cogs/spacers is going to help distribute the load considerably.
 

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Never trust a fart
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I just got and mounted up the HG80 cassette. Only the 3 lowest gears are on a common spider, all others are separate. However when you torque the lock nut down, they get really slammed together. I would imagine friction between cogs/spacers is going to help distribute the load considerably.
You will still see gouging occur from the separate gears, no matter how tight you get it. Your pedaling torque will overcome any friction.

I'll have to take a few pictures and post them up.
 

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Former Bike Wrench
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HG80 ok? Little cheaper than XT, still has the carrier IIRC...
Only on the three largest gears (vs 6 for XT, XTR, and SRAM PG990). The middle gears don't gouge as much as the low gears, but will still be enough that removing the cassette might be a challenge.
 

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Spanish rider
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XT and XTR cassettes have the 6 largest cogs mounted on spiders. The smallest cogs can still mar the freehub but they are much less likely to do damage of any significance
Old XT's came with five cogs (like the one on the picture) mounted on a spider, and the rest were independent. The biggest of those four is big enough to mar the freehub. (I didn't know that new XT's came now with 6 on the spider).



I know that lower end models (e.g. Deore, which comes with 7 cogs riveted together) do damage the freehub body, but the damage is generally small and it does not grow indefinitely (I've never had problems removing the cassete due to the deformationmarks on the spline of the freehub)

However, I asume that I may be wrong :thumbsup:
 

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Old XT's came with five cogs mounted on a spider, and the rest were independent. The biggest of those four is big enough to mar the freehub. (I didn't know that new XT's came with 6 on the spider).
That's the 11-32t versions you've been using then. My previous 9 speed 11-34t XT cassettes have all had 6 cogs on the spider, and according to Shimano's tech docs this holds true all the way back to the original spidered XT cassette (M750) from the late 90s

I know that lower end models (e.g. Deore which comes with 7 cogs riveted together) do damage the freehub body, but the damage is generally small and it does not grow indefinitely.

However I asume that I may be wrong :thumbsup:
Yes, it probably won't keep going forever and spin all the way through the splines, but like others have said, the damage can be enough that it requires some hard work with a mallet or with two chainwhips to pull the cogs out of their grooves in order to slide the cassette off.
 

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psycho cyclo addict
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A tougher freehub body... titanium in the case of XTR and stainless steel in the case of Chris King an others I would imagine. CK sells them for their hubs but discourages use in many cases as overkill (with weight penalty). According to CK support, there will always be some bunching caused by the cassette sitting on the freehub body which they say is common and generally not an issue as it tends to stop at some point where you can still remove a cassette w/o too much trouble and does not affect performance.
 
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