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Just got my Jamis Exile 3 and need new pedals. I had a bad wreck and broke my leg when I was using some SPD pedals and have been hesitant about going back to clipless, so I've rode toe clips for the past 7 years but my riding hasn't been the same, no bunny hops and some obstacles I have to dismount for. So my question is, toe clips or clipless?which ones and why?
 

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ballbuster
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I wouldn't....

Just got my Jamis Exile 3 and need new pedals. I had a bad wreck and broke my leg when I was using some SPD pedals and have been hesitant about going back to clipless, so I've rode toe clips for the past 7 years but my riding hasn't been the same, no bunny hops and some obstacles I have to dismount for. So my question is, toe clips or clipless?which ones and why?
... blame the SPDs. SPDs are way safer than toe clips. Easier to pop out when things go kablooey, and more secure when you're in.

Toe clips only really work when you cinch down on the straps, then they don't release.
 

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Clipless, no question.

For me, it's Frogs. Very easy to get out of! It does take a bit of getting used to how they feel, though.
 

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I like Eggbeaters for the float and ease of removal. You just fall out of them in a crash. I'm always able to get a foot out. Some don't like them because they claim they pop out too easily and that they break. The design was just changed. I had never broke a pair of mine. You only accidentially pop out if you're not used to the float. They don't really resist and clunk in and out like most pedals.
 

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If you decide to try SPDs again, consider getting the "multi-release" SH56 cleats. They release very easily. With used with the tension screw at the loosest setting, you simply pull your foot out any which way. You can gradually increase the tension as you regain your confidence.
 

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You ride with toe clips? Geez that's scary. I have never been injured due to SPD's, in a wreck my foot has always come out of the pedal. If you are using toe clips your foot can get stuck and not come out during a wreck. To me it's waaayyy more dangerous. When I worked at a bike shop we refused to sell toe clips because of this. Go back to SPD's and you will wonder why you ever left.

As far as which pedal to use I have never had any problem with any of my SPD pedals. I have had a pair of the M520's (the cheapest model and $35 on JensonUSA) on my road bike for the past 5 years with no problems whatsoever. On my mtb I run the one step up, the M540 ($58 on JensonUSA), and have never had any problem with those either. They both get used and abused and work flawlessly every time.
 

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Definitely a YMMV question. I used toe clips and straps way back for a while. Then 17 years of SPD-style clipless. Now I'm using flat pedals with no retention (Wellgo MG-1). My main beef with clipless was that the tread would wear away around the cleat faster than the cleat would, so if I had to walk, I'd end up walking on the cleat rather than rubber. OK if you don't walk, and I try to avoid walking the bike if at all I can, but still very annoying if you have to hoof it on bare rock. With the flat pedals, I just wear my everyday shoes, some New Balance cross trainers. No need to change shoes at the trailhead. No worries about traction for hike-a-bike. I don't think I would've considered this years ago- the pedals were more of the bear-claw type. Heavy, and good but not great grip. With newer pedals that use pins for traction, you get great traction. And they're no heavier- my Wellgo MG-1 pedals weight approximately the same as my Nashbar/Wellgo clipless pedals with cleat did. I also like the low-tech factor. Although I generally found clipless to be amazingly reliable given the mechanism and the rough environment, it was a clipless failure that prodded me to switch to flat pedals. I was riding in on a trail with some high grass right by it, on a steep climb. When I ran out of steam on the climb and tried to get my right foot out, it was firmly stuck in the pedal. I toppled over, unhurt. Turns out some of the tall grass had gotten fouled in the clipless mechanism as I rode and locked it up!

Bunny hops are not the sole property of clipless riders, as you may well know. I myself have not yet perfected it, but it is entirely possible to do a bunny hop with no retention. BMXers do it all day long. You have to rotate your center of gravity, rather than just pulling up on the pedals. Although I think I may have to get shin guards before I try to practice that one too much!
 

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Definitely a YMMV question. I used toe clips and straps way back for a while. Then 17 years of SPD-style clipless. Now I'm using flat pedals with no retention (Wellgo MG-1). My main beef with clipless was that the tread would wear away around the cleat faster than the cleat would, so if I had to walk, I'd end up walking on the cleat rather than rubber. OK if you don't walk, and I try to avoid walking the bike if at all I can, but still very annoying if you have to hoof it on bare rock. With the flat pedals, I just wear my everyday shoes, some New Balance cross trainers. No need to change shoes at the trailhead. No worries about traction for hike-a-bike. I don't think I would've considered this years ago- the pedals were more of the bear-claw type. Heavy, and good but not great grip. With newer pedals that use pins for traction, you get great traction. And they're no heavier- my Wellgo MG-1 pedals weight approximately the same as my Nashbar/Wellgo clipless pedals with cleat did. I also like the low-tech factor. Although I generally found clipless to be amazingly reliable given the mechanism and the rough environment, it was a clipless failure that prodded me to switch to flat pedals. I was riding in on a trail with some high grass right by it, on a steep climb. When I ran out of steam on the climb and tried to get my right foot out, it was firmly stuck in the pedal. I toppled over, unhurt. Turns out some of the tall grass had gotten fouled in the clipless mechanism as I rode and locked it up!

Bunny hops are not the sole property of clipless riders, as you may well know. I myself have not yet perfected it, but it is entirely possible to do a bunny hop with no retention. BMXers do it all day long. You have to rotate your center of gravity, rather than just pulling up on the pedals. Although I think I may have to get shin guards before I try to practice that one too much!
My story is very similar. Started with plain ol' stock pedals, then went to clip pedals cuz it was the cool thing, and then moved to clipless for 15 years. I'm now riding flats with comfy skate shoes. In my case, I gave the flats a try because no matter what I did, my feet hurt in those darn clipless shoes - even caused me to give up mountain biking for a couple of years. First ride with cheap flats and tennis shoes and wow! No pain! And, even with cheap flats and tennis shoes I didn't have an issue slipping. As an added bonus I just felt "more free" and confident/comfortable when riding.

Now I have good pedals and skate shoes and riding is fun again -- I rode in discomfort for so long that I just thought it was part and parcel of biking. Its amazing how much more fun riding can be when your feet don't hurt the entire ride!

But that is just my experience and like so many other other things with biking - you should ride what makes you feel best. Unless its with clips. Just ditch those!
 

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All of my biking friends ride clipless, they all love them and say they would never go back to toe straps or flats.

I ride flats because they seem good enough, I have never really had a reason to use anything else.
 

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~Reformed Mechanic~
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Toe clips? Thats just kinda crazy with todays modern clipless. Ive used Times and CB. Definitely Egg Beaters FTW!
 

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I've gone from toe clips, to spd, to time atacs, to crank brothers.

By far, I like the times the best, but they are so heavy I decided to go with crank brothers (eggs and candys). They have a similar feel to times but don't have the weight penalty.

I would never go back to toe clips and not a fan of the spd's. I don't want to have another thing to fiddle with on my bike (tension adjustments on spd's), so the cranks bros are just install and forget. Also, I've had some accidental unclips with SPD's where I haven't had any with the Crank Bros.

And to make sure, Crank Bros are VERY easy to get out of. In fact, I can't remember the last time I had an oh **** moment and didn't find myself unclipped before I even knew it.
 

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~Reformed Mechanic~
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And to make sure, Crank Bros are VERY easy to get out of. In fact, I can't remember the last time I had an oh **** moment and didn't find myself unclipped before I even knew it.

This is the #1 reason for me why the EB's are top of my list, I dont feel like im in danger riding them on the scary trails
 

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SSolo, on your left!
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I like Eggbeaters for the float and ease of removal. You just fall out of them in a crash. I'm always able to get a foot out. Some don't like them because they claim they pop out too easily and that they break. The design was just changed. I had never broke a pair of mine. You only accidentially pop out if you're not used to the float. They don't really resist and clunk in and out like most pedals.
Crank Brothers....Acid or Candy. :thumbsup:
 
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