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Just purchased my first downhill bike a specialized Demo 8 it comes with a rockshox boxxer rc but I want to upgrade to another fork. Which of the following three 2011 forks would you recomend.

Fox 40

Boxxer world cup

Marzocchi 888 RC3 EVO TI

I am a small rider 5' 3'' and weigh 140 lbs without gear.
 

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Agreed wiht Iggz

Seeing as you have just got your first downhill bike, for now the RC will do you fine if your only getting into DH, your wasting are large amount of money on something that will only cause you headaches if your just starting out because of all the extra adjustments, save your money until you get better

Having the highest end fork does not make you a faster rider
 

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Nick_M2R said:
Agreed wiht Iggz

Seeing as you have just got your first downhill bike, for now the RC will do you fine if your only getting into DH, your wasting are large amount of money on something that will only cause you headaches if your just starting out because of all the extra adjustments, save your money until you get better

Having the highest end fork does not make you a faster rider
Agreed. The highest end forks (apparently) require MUCH more regular maintenance as well. I'd rather be riding than fixing. Get some assistance setting the stock fork set up for your riding level and weight and you'll be fine.
 

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if you are set on upgrading then just upgrade the damper. Go with an ELKA or Avalanche damper. It is a cheap option for a custom tuned damper (well cheaper than buying a new fork and it will have better internals). This may be best anyway since you are so light and the standard dampers will typically be tuned for heavier riders.
 

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Bingo, your stock Boxxer coil with Avalanche damper. While I like the feel and long service intervals of the 888 and I'm intrigued by the Dorado, I wouldn't spend money on either if I had a brand new Boxxer. Ride your fork for a while and use its adjustments so you get an idea of what you want different, then get the Avalanche cart.
 

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I'd buy the 888 Evo.

However, I know what I want in a DH fork and I know what all the twisty knobs and dials do and how and why they do it.

Making an assumption here, but your question really seemed to be "what fork should I buy because I think my Boxxer isn't going to cut it even though I haven't spent a bunch of time on it yet?"

A simple DH fork the like your Boxxer is a great fork to figure out what's what. You'll soon learn how to dial things in and also learn what adjustments are lacking and why you could use them for lots of different terrain.

After that, it becomes much easier to figure out who's damper, adjustments, service requirements will be best for your needs.

I see 40's and Boxxer WCs all the time that ride like crap because the owner has no idea how to get the best performance out of the stock tuning options. Those riders would have been better off with a good fork like your Boxxer where it's hard to screw up the performance due to the minimal adjustments.

Play with different springs and the available adjustments for a while and you'll figure out what you need for your personal riding preferences in short order. Get the spring weight dialed and then through in the above mentioned after market tuning options and you'll have a great fork.

All that being said, you could easily sell your new Boxxer and have a whack of cash to drop on a new or last year's 888,40, or WC.
 

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Any time I've read a tip from a pro rider or coach regarding the purchase of parts, they always say "buy the best you can afford". I hate it when I ask for opinions on parts and people immediately assume they should be my financial adviser. That being said, I assume you can afford any of those forks or you wouldn't have made the post.

All those forks are upgrades, I wish I could say I had experience on them but I don't. I just bought my first Fox 40 for my new build, and can't wait to ride it. In general, I'm a big fan of Fox for the experience they bring to the table. They make great shocks for all applications.

At that level, I really don't think you can go wrong with any of those forks. Sometimes it just comes to which one you like the best, even if it is just for aesthetic reasons. A large part of improvement is mental, and having a bike with parts you really love will bring positive mojo.
 

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I ride retro, late model Shiver. Inverted design pushes the mud and dust away from the stansions and does not require as much maintanence. I have not felt a need to get a new fork. Of the forks you've mentioned, I would lust after the 888 Ti. 40 has been the benchmark. I'm not paitent enough to trade the boxxer maintanence for the weight savings.
 

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MarZoch8 888, regular or Ti, both work great but the ti is going to be lighter, unless you want to be breaking your fork down every month and spending a bunch of cash on new seals and labor on a fox 40 or boxer. I have had the 40, great fork but got tired of spending 120.00 bucks every few months because the seals start leaking oil. If you are a mechanic and you are savvy and you don't mind the high maintenance, fox is a great fork. I like marzocchi because I put them on and run the heck out of them with very little maintenance, maybe once a year for an oil change.
 

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mjdthunder said:
I have had the 40, great fork but got tired of spending 120.00 bucks every few months because the seals start leaking oil.
You need to change your mechanic if you're spending $120 on an oil change and new seals.
 

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Ya changing the oil and seals on a 40 is super easy i change the oil every 20 hours of uses and the seals and oil every 40 and it only takes maye 15 minutes to do.
 

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Yeah well if you send it to fox, they will charge you about 100.00 bucks and then you have to pay shipping at about 20.00 bucks etc. New seals are close to 40.00 right? and labor if you can get it cheap maybe 30 bucks or more? Like I said, if you have the know how, and you are cool with breaking your fork down every 20 hours and you want to pony up for new seals every so often...by all means, the 40 is a great fork ( oh yeah, the lowers are pretty thin on the 40s so you have to be more careful with them as well). If you are like me, and you just want to ride and spend less time on fork maintenance...go Marzocchi 888.
 

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I've got 4 rides on my 2011 Boxxer WC, and lovin' it. A few things you need to think about the Boxxer.

1. More adjustable then either the Fox or the 888. Having seperate rebound settings (ending and beginning stroke) is HUGE in my book. I can dial the fork to feel exactly as I like with less compromise.

2. Air spring tunability. With your weight, the air spirng will help you dial in the right amount of sag and feel that you just can't get from a coil. The new WC Solo Air spring feels superb, with a great mid stroke, and beautiful ramp up. It is uber plush as well. I'm 180lbs, and run 55psi according to my pump.

3. Ease of service. The Boxxer, and RS forks in general, are very easy to service. It takes minutes to change the oil bath, and the sealed damper fluid needs to be changed minimally.

4. Great CS from SRAM IMO. I am more confident in SRAM to solve any issues I may have more quickly and cheaper than the other manufacturers.

5. Lighter than both, and it is noticable.

6. I can't comment on the durability of the fork as I just don't have enough time on it. However, I have been rocking a Lyrik Solo Air DH for a while and it is great. The Boxxer Solo Air is very similar, and exceptionally simple.

7. I agree with above poster, you know your budget and desires, do what you want.
 

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BoXXer WC (lighter, easier to get the "spring rate" right for your weight) If you have the money go for it! Or you could drop a lighter spring (yellow, for us lightweights!) and an Avalanche cartridge in the existing fork. Massive upgrade for not much money! It's exactly what I did to my 2010 Session 8. Transformed the way the bike handles everything. Smooth, controlled, confidence inspiring!
 

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I have about 4 to 5 years on 888's and can say I would never go to a higher maintenance fork. I love air and the tune-ablity for sure, but with air definitely comes more maintenance. If you are a mechanical guy and have the know how and time to service your fork, by all means the boxxer and Fox are there. Since I have the new EVO ti, I had Marzocchi tune my shims to my weight and bottom out specs so to me, the spring curve is exactly where I want it. I love the fact that the structure is larger and stiffer than the boxxer. Going back to the original question and if you do not know what fork to get, you are probably new to the sport and will probably benefit from the least amount of maintenance possible...888.
 
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