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There are so many different types of grease, oils, etc on the market. How do I know which one to use in a certain situations and where to put it, such as bearings or threads. Thanks for any tips or advice in advance.
 

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this is a complicated question... also for the same application you might even want different types of the same grease, eg head set vs bb or hub bearings. Usually every time you talk grease you are talking waterproof grease, axles, shafts, pedal, threaded bb, integrated headset cups. Most threads that don't really move usually you might use blue loctite suspension pivot, rd hanger, calipers, rotors. seatpost, handlebars usually require some carbon paste to avoid sliding down or out of the way they should be...
 

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The OEM or component manufacturer service information is the place to begin. Most primary bearings (hubs, headsets, bottom brackets, pivot) one type of grease can be used. A thick, waterproof marine grease. There are many different options, but this a good start. There might be some applications where you will want to adjust your lubrication type based on your experience or outcome.

Freehub lubricant can depend on several factors, but generally you have two choices. Oil or grease based lubricants. these choices can be based on the type of freehub you are using and perhaps level of performance.

Bottom line if long term durability and maximum protection is desired, go with the thicker, waterproof type grease. If performance and low coefficient of friction are your objectives, then often a lighter, less viscous grease will be your preference. Note that if seeking enhanced performance and lower friction, then the there will be a trade-off. Increased service intervals.

Suspension grease or lubricants are more specific and a better understanding of the OEM objective will help you select the right lubricant such as SRAM Butter or Buzzy's Slick Honey. Slick Honey is wonderful stuff. A lighter grease that has multiple applications on a bike.

Lubricants can seem a bit mysterious and maybe confusing, but with a little curiosity, you can learn a lot through simple research. It's all about your objectives.
 

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HPG is their high-end grease that is supposed to be acceptable for ceramic bearings, ASG is anti-seize compound. I use it threaded or maybe splined areas that are susceptible to seizure. I use an anti-seize on pedal threads into cranks and perhaps a few other locations depending on metal incompatibility. Parks PPL is a general grease acceptable for most primary bearings.
 

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Freehub lubricant can depend on several factors, but generally you have two choices. Oil or grease based lubricants. these choices can be based on the type of freehub you are using and perhaps level of performance.
And a word of caution about oils: most chain lubricants should not be considered "oil". If it contains parafin, you shouldn't lubricate your freehub with it.
 

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There are so many different types of grease, oils, etc on the market. How do I know which one to use in a certain situations and where to put it, such as bearings or threads. Thanks for any tips or advice in advance.
With bearings the lubricant used is important. Everywhere else is more a matter of not having lubricant that will result in dirt build up on the surfaces, as with the chain. The deraileur, bottom bracket, pedals, and wheel hubs are where I focus my attention. Lots of money to be made by selling a few ounces of magic lubricant to the bike market which is why the confusion. Check with your local bike shop and see what they use on a day to day basis.

With sealed hubs and bottom brackets and often pedal bearings it is less of a concern but with standard ball bearings it is worth the time and effort to take them apart and put in new grease. This is where a good local bike shop can be quite valuable as they know which bikes are likely to need attention when they come out of the shipping box.
 

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Basic lubricants... It's really pretty elementary and the OEM or component manufacturer will usually specify the type of lubricant whether an oil, grease or whatever. Use this information to your advantage. Their specified lubricant is usually a re-branded lubricant that meets their specification based on the application. Once you understand the specified type of lubricant (classification, base, viscosities etc.) recommended by the OEM, you can understand what alternative lubricants are commonly marketed that meet the same specification.

Common bearing grease is one of those items that many are confused about. You can easily find high quality bearing grease at any auto parts store or Wally World to use on most of your primary bearing applications (BB, head set, hubs (not freehubs), pivot bearings). Just decide your viscosity to meet your personal preferences of protection vs. efficiency or performance.
 

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This is a very nice article


What are the different greases used in Enduro bearings and how do you choose those lubes?
We use basically three types of grease: Mobil XHP 222 for ABEC 3 and 5 bearings, Almagard 3752 for MAX and headset bearings, and then Kluber Isoflex for Ceramic and Stainless Steel bearings. Mobil XHP 222 is a good all-around grease that provides great protection and is resistant to water washout while still spinning fast. It is extremely stable in very hot or very cold conditions and is resistant to separation. Almagard is a super extra high-pressure grease meaning that it cannot be pushed out of the way even under the extreme pressure of a ball pressing down with maximum force. Almagard acts as a pillow between the balls and race where the bearings are not consistently turning, but fretting so that you do not get the associated wear. Kluber Isoflex is a very sophisticated and very 鈥渇ast鈥 grease that also can resist wet conditions and protect. Kluber has excellent sheering capabilities that you almost don鈥檛 notice that it is grease but feels like a light oil.

My take:

Basically, #1 Mobil XHP 222 is for mid-level bearings and general applications such as the dropper post tube. This grease is specifically recommended by Yeti for their SB switch infinity link. You want the one that has the word "special" in its name as there are differing amounts of molybdenum with a very similar naming convention. This grease can be used for lubricating bottom brackets and pivot bolts as well. Not very expensive.

#2 Almagard 3752 is a super grease for headset bushings and bearings (and the like) that aren't constantly spinning. Somewhat expensive.

#3 is specifically Isoflex Topas NB 52 a very high quality and sophisticated German grease used on fast spinning bearings. Bbinfinite uses it on some of their bottom bracket bearings. Expensive comparatively speaking. They also can grease their bearings with WS2 tungsten disulfide which is a dry lubricant invented by Nasa.

There are also different brands of thread lockers such as loctite and vibra tite with differing products within the brands for specific purposes. Differently numbered products for different purposes. The government prefers vibra tite from what I hear. I use it for the grips and anywhere else I need a bolt to stay put on my mountain bike, motorcycles etc.

 

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My take:
Basically, #1 Mobil XHP 222 is for mid-level bearings and general applications
#2 Almagard 3752 is a super grease for headset bushings and bearings
#3 is specifically Isoflex Topas NB 52 a very high quality and sophisticated German grease
There's no doubt these are high-quality lubricants that are designed for high temp, extreme pressure industrial, marine and automotive specialty applications, but do we need the variety and in one case, the expense of these for a bike? The Mobil XHP is common inexpensive mainstream bearing grease that can cover every bearing on a bike. Almagard 3752 is about twice the price of the Mobil and it meets the same design specs.

In fact, it's interesting in the separation of the recommended application because in the industry, these two greases are interchangeable and meet the same design standards.

Onyx Hubs recommends Kluber Isoflex for the Sprag Clutch, but it's not the Topas NB. I think its LDS 18.
 

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There's no doubt these are high-quality lubricants that are designed for high temp, extreme pressure industrial, marine and automotive specialty applications, but do we need the variety and in one case, the expense of these for a bike? The Mobil XHP is common inexpensive mainstream bearing grease that can cover every bearing on a bike. Almagard 3752 is about twice the price of the Mobil and it meets the same design specs.

In fact, it's interesting in the separation of the recommended application because in the industry, these two greases are interchangeable and meet the same design standards.

Onyx Hubs recommends Kluber Isoflex for the Sprag Clutch, but it's not the Topas NB. I think its LDS 18.
The Mobil grease can be used for many more applications than simply bearings, as mentioned. Moly greases are for bearings, but are also recommended in slow or oscillating motions such as those seen in universal and CV joints (or pivots, pivot bolts etc.). It is a great grease for a younger person without much money for general use on every component on a mountain bike. I also use it for the bearings and handles in my fishing reels. As for the Almagard, watch a video of the particular benefits it may offer. It is extrememly resistant (doesn't break down) and resilient (goes back into shape) to pressure from friction, water etc. Great for the turning motion of the headset; much more so than the Mobil grease. Worth the extra $$.... imo.

The op requested information concerning "different types of grease, oils, etc on the market". You gave a great general overview which I thank you for and I followed up with proven real world examples. Take care.
 

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Magically Delicious
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As for the Almagard, watch a video of the particular benefits it may offer. It is extrememly resistant (doesn't break down) and resilient (goes back into shape) to pressure from friction, water etc. Great for the turning motion of the headset; much more so than the Mobil grease. Worth the extra $$.... imo.
Maybe I'm missing something here, but what attributes does Almagard offer that the Mobil does not?
 

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