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Discussion Starter #1
It's been 7 years since I bought my bike at a LBS. It's been through a lot. I have never really serviced it before. I was wondering where would be a good place to service it? Here are my symptoms:

- chain slips on occasion
- shifting won't go into the gear sometimes
- crank squeaks a lot
- headset seems to have some play
- fork??? never added any oil, etc
- cannot go into the biggest cog in the front

I was thinking I could go to the Offramp on El Camino since I've been there in the past when I was a kid. I'm just looking for a good place with reasonable prices for tuning up my bike. I prefer to stay in the South Bay.
 

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another bozo on the bus
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7 years! Dont be surprized if the bill is $200+ as I am guessing you will be replacing chain, little and middle chainrings, and cassette in addition to your tune up. Chains wear pretty quickly and if you dont replace them somewhat regularly, you end up wearing out the rest of your drivetrain. I replace mine at least once a season.
 

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Trailhead cyclery is good, but can be expensive (though you usually get what you pay for) and they're busy, so you might have to wait a bit.

Menlo Velo on El Camino and Middle is pretty good.

Check out the shop reviews section.

I'd recommend learning to do it yourself if you're mechanically inclined and have the time to learn. Pick up a copy of Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. You probably need a new bottom bracket, chainrings, cassette, chain, cables, derailleur housing, and brake pads. The cost of the book and tools is probably less than the labor.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
washedup said:
7 years! Dont be surprized if the bill is $200+ as I am guessing you will be replacing chain, little and middle chainrings, and cassette in addition to your tune up. Chains wear pretty quickly and if you dont replace them somewhat regularly, you end up wearing out the rest of your drivetrain. I replace mine at least once a season.
Tell me about it...I stopped riding for a good 4 years during those 7 years. So I'm pretty much out of the loop. I'm thinking about maybe just buying a FS and start all over into the bike world. I'm no racer or anything but I do like to enjoy the great outdoors.

I'm probably going to end up with a 2008 Ibex ASTA Pro or Expert. The question is now if I decide to work on my old bike to hold me over until then. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
kev1n said:
Trailhead cyclery is good, but can be expensive (though you usually get what you pay for) and they're busy, so you might have to wait a bit.

Menlo Velo on El Camino and Middle is pretty good.

Check out the shop reviews section.

I'd recommend learning to do it yourself if you're mechanically inclined and have the time to learn. Pick up a copy of Zinn and the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance. You probably need a new bottom bracket, chainrings, cassette, chain, cables, derailleur housing, and brake pads. The cost of the book and tools is probably less than the labor.
Thanks for the recommendation. I will definitely shop around.

I am very mechanically inclined (cars) but I don't know if I have the space to work on my bike. The garage is pretty filled up already. Would I need those "bike lifts" to work on a bike? I usually just turn the bike upside down to change tires and fix flats and what not. Like I said in my previous post, I may buy a new FS bike. Would the tools that come from Ibex be sufficient enough to repair the old lady?
 

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Lusus Naturae
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Got a picture of this tortured bike of yours? :)

Yeah, a new FS bike is most likely just as light(or heavy) as your old bike, plus you'll be getting a lot of new technology upgrades. Your 7 years older rear end will be thankful for the FS as well!

Where did you see the IBEX on sale and what price? Link?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NoBalance said:
Got a picture of this tortured bike of yours? :)

Yeah, a new FS bike is most likely just as light(or heavy) as your old bike, plus you'll be getting a lot of new technology upgrades. Your 7 years older rear end will be thankful for the FS as well!

Where did you see the IBEX on sale and what price? Link?
Pics as requested:













I used to wash/lube my bike when I first got it. Then I started to become lazy about it. Now I'm paying the price (literally!)

Oh the Ibex isn't on sale. I'm waiting for the 2008 to come out. Maybe there is a pre-order special??
 

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aka baycat
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Want a cheaper and albeit different solution?

Convert that bad boy to a single speed, then you can get rid of all your drivetrain. Just pick up a retention device.

Save money on new parts and repairs, and then spend the rest on a new full boinger.
 

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baycat said:
Convert that bad boy to a single speed, then you can get rid of all your drivetrain. Just pick up a retention device.

Save money on new parts and repairs, and then spend the rest on a new full boinger.
baycat......when did you get all smart and stuff?...good suggestion :thumbsup:
 

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aka baycat
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ate some wheaties this morning.

You riding this weekend? Or taking a sabbatical from all your crazy adventure bike races.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
baycat said:
Want a cheaper and albeit different solution?

Convert that bad boy to a single speed, then you can get rid of all your drivetrain. Just pick up a retention device.

Save money on new parts and repairs, and then spend the rest on a new full boinger.
The thing is, I might want to keep this bike as a "around towner". I like HT for those flat, long rides but also would like FS when I'm just hitting up some trails (Saratoga gap). It was fun on HT but I would imagine it be better on FS. I notice chunks of my tires we ripped off and the ride really really rough.
 

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strider said:
The thing is, I might want to keep this bike as a "around towner". I like HT for those flat, long rides but also would like FS when I'm just hitting up some trails (Saratoga gap).
Perfect for a single speed, and you will become a much stronger rider and impress the ladies with your full suspension skillz. :eekster:
 

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I really think baycat's onto something with the ss conversion, especially if you're also looking to use the bike as a townie ride.

The Gap is best ridden on a rigid SS :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
kev1n said:
I really think baycat's onto something with the ss conversion, especially if you're also looking to use the bike as a townie ride.

The Gap is best ridden on a rigid SS :)
I'm not sure if we are talking about the same trail. The one I go to is near the 4-Way stop sign. It is a light descent but then you get to pick where to go and I usually make a right. From there it was technical, descending type of stuff. There is even a part where you cross a small stream I think.
 

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It's about showing up.
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This bike is a keeper!

LX/XT Rockhopper in nice shape but deeply filthy. It really needs a good cleaning to make the most of any maintenance/repairs. Get some Simple Greens and a good parts brush and apply elbow grease. My blue sky call is that she needs a good tune-up. She looks pretty good from here and a $100-$200 spent on her is a good investment and she has more to teach you than you have ability to test her. She was probably about $700-800 new and add $200 it's about $125 per year. That is nothing. Move forward with confidence.
DO NOT SKIP THE CLEANING. Your mechinic will appreciate it. I have this whihc I sent my team after a very nasty race:

1) Wet your bike down, soak it, and let it sit a bit and soften all of the
mud.

2) Knock off the mega dirt with high pressure water but do not aim pressure
at any bearings. Hit tires hard.

3) Apply Simple Greens, about 2 oz diluted in about a cereal bowl of water,
liberally and extensively with a two-inch brush or sponge on everything,
especially the chain. Let sit for no more than five minutes. Do not let
Simple Greens stand for any longer, as it will etch your aluminum parts.

4) Scrub areas of dirt, including tires last, with brush and rinse with
water. Check for dirt. Re-apply Simple Greens and water as needed until bike
is dirt free. Rinse liberally.

5) Shake off excess water and hand dry with a soft towel. Dry everything you
can reach. EVERYTHING. This will remove traces of dirt.

6) Wipe chain Dry, removing as much dirt as possible. Apply WD-40 liberally
to chain. Let sit overnight.

7) Apply chain Lube in the morning. Perform general bike lube, Tri-flow or the like, on brake pivots, deraiileur pivots, shifter and brake lever pivots. Wipe off excess. Ride it around a bit.

There are more things you can do, thorough and complete chain
cleaning is best but that is another story and you may have a new chain in your future. Removing wheels when you clean helps, too, as you can get at more stuff.

Don' t discount this bike, it is a fine machine
 

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strider said:
I'm not sure if we are talking about the same trail. The one I go to is near the 4-Way stop sign. It is a light descent but then you get to pick where to go and I usually make a right. From there it was technical, descending type of stuff. There is even a part where you cross a small stream I think.
kev!n is right......the Gap is best on a rigid SS.....as with most trails out here Norcal... :thumbsup:
 

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Ahh, the days when tires actually came in colors other than black. Seems that was a trend for a while but now its back to all black again.

Thats a pretty clean looking bike. Just needs to be, well, cleaned, and the other stuff you mentioned. Dont give these other guys your address, they might come over and steal it for further SS torturing, etc!

Get the FS first, then you can work on your old bike at will, being mechanically inclined.
 

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baycat said:
Perfect for a single speed, and you will become a much stronger rider and impress the ladies with your full suspension skillz. :eekster:
I've only been to the Gap once and rode many of the trails there. They were definitely SS rigid friendly.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for all the quick replies. I really appreciate it!!

I guess I will start by cleaning up the ol' rig. I do have some simple green in the garage somewhere. As far as WD-40 goes, I heard that's a big no-no for bicycles especially chains. Is there any place you recommend buying bicycle specific lubes online or is it all pretty much the same?

Oh the tires are Panaracer 26x1.95. It came stock with Specialized house brand tires which I replaced way back when.
 
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