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i have a rockshox tora tk and i was wondering if someone could tell me on what type of terrain would you use a slower rebound and a faster rebound and why.

i think... think being the key word you would want a fast rebound for say fast trails that are bumpy so the wheel stays in contact with the ground more and maybe a slower rebound for large jumps. im not 100% sure tho.

would love to hear your input.
 

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Rebound is almost a set it and forget it adjustment. But I do tend to slow it down a bit if I'm riding slow chunky trails. Faster stuff I speed it up as much as I can without having the bike start kicking me through dips in the trail. Gotta get the suspension extended for the next hit ASAP. Suspension feels plusher in the top 30% of the travel so you don't want to pack down too much if you can avoid it.

On the chunk slow rebound really helps add a sense of control though.
 

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I set my rebound at a tad faster than recommended, and start slowing it down to to tame bigger hits. Then it stays there all the time. I will mess with it a couple of times a year, but generally end up setting it to where I had it before.

It helps that I have a small note on my phone reminding me of my settings and any adjustments. It gets a bit confusing trying to remember every little detail setting up one bike, out of a few.
 

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In my opinion its a preferrence thing, try riding with different settings and see which one suits you best.

I like a fast rebound on short travel forks for XC stuff and a slower rebound on longer travel forks for All Mountain/Trail riding.
 

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You should google Fast & Slow rebound. Fast rebound deals with "vibrations" from the trail while Slow rebound does the longer pumping motions. Both are always working if you have them installed.
What you are talking about is only true if you have a fork with a high speed rebound shim stack. Most lower to mid range forks do not. They have a simple port orifice rebound damper that will always rebound at the same speed, no matter the size of the hit.

OP, Rebound is something that you should set and forget for the most part. You can slow it down just a touch for trails where you are riding slow or that are smooth and flow. And speed it up a little when riding fast or in a trail that is very bumpy with lots of rocks, roots, or braking bumps. But in general, you should find a setting that is fast enough to not pack up(not rebound fast enough to extend back to full travel before then next bump) without giving a pogo stick like feel makes you feel like its going to buck off the bike.
 

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Push and pull

I would recommend a pretty fast rebound for day to day XC. Good way to set up is to stand over the bike and push down hard on the forks then lift the bars quickly. The fork should just keep up with you. If it is slower to react then dial some out, if it springs back dial some in.
 

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Twisted,
I like my rebound to be a bit slow, because it will dampen the tendency of the shock to "buck" you off after particularly hard and inelegant hits.

Do you ever come down off of drops, crazy-big or as small as a tall curb, and then the back end kicks up and wants to buck you over the bars? Give it more rebound dampening and see what you think.
 

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I'll add a bit of adjustment depends on the suspensions damper type. My 05' Pike w/ a ported rebound damper really didn't like a slow rebound or the fork packed up on hi speed chatter. My newer Dual Flow RS allows for a slower rebound setting w/o packing.
 
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