Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
When I'm riding my bike my arms tend to lockout unless I lean over more and bend them.
Does this mean the bike is too stretched out or big for me, or do I just lean over more to prevent lockout of my arms?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
bwheelin said:
When I'm riding my bike my arms tend to lockout unless I lean over more and bend them.
Does this mean the bike is too stretched out or big for me, or do I just lean over more to prevent lockout of my arms?
As our Psycho Pmate said, you must have slightly bent arms. Less shock, more manoeuvrability.

As to why your arms are straight, that's a tough one.

How long have you been riding? Beginners tend to feel a little uncomfortable on the bike, and usually two things happen: they have the saddle too low (which can tend to make you site up and straighten your arms), and the old "pucker factor", along with the fact that riding bent arms is a strain on the triceps, tends to make you lock your arms

Ironically if you have the saddle too _high_ in relation to the bars, that can make you uneasy and straighten your arms. Can't win! <G>

The bike _may_ be too big, or not set up right.

What bike and frame size do you have? How tall are you? What's your inside leg? That's basic. Fitting a bike really carefully is a science in itself. But you may be able to adapt either yourself or the bike if the problem is minor. I have. My wife has. We may have got better fits, but it's near enough that we enjoy riding, with a bit of adjustment.

Can you try moving the saddle back or forward to see if that helps? Can you adjust the height of the bars?

The bars height in relation to the saddle is very variable. I run about level, but many guys run with the saddle a good 3-4" over the bars. Naturally that is going to make bending the arms even more of a strain, both mental and physical, but I cannot argue with their decision, because it's "whatever works" (as long as you have tried other stuff first, so you know it _is_ working <G>)

If you know somebody that's into MTB then that's the way to go. But don't get "told" according to formula. Try the standard, but in the end you're the one with your bum in the saddle, and it's a very personal thing. (can't get much _more_ personal really ! <G>)

EDIT: (heeee's baaack). Also check out the tilt of your seat (thought of this as soon as I jumped on my bike) Again it's a matter of preference and comfort, but if the seat is tilted toward the back, it will tend to make you site up (for perhaps obvious reasons <G>). But tilting it forward tends to make you lean forward, and that can help. I am not talking extremes here. Again, little bit at a time: just a nudge. It should be comfortable with your arms _slightly_ bent (10 deg?) during normal riding,. without making you feel as if you are sliding forward and having to fight it.

If your bike is just way wrong then this can only try to fix it.

Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OldNick said:
As our Psycho Pmate said, you must have slightly bent arms. Less shock, more manoeuvrability.

As to why your arms are straight, that's a tough one.

How long have you been riding? Beginners tend to feel a little uncomfortable on the bike, and usually two things happen: they have the saddle too low (which can tend to make you site up and straighten your arms), and the old "pucker factor", along with the fact that riding bent arms is a strain on the triceps, tends to make you lock your arms

Ironically if you have the saddle too _high_ in relation to the bars, that can make you uneasy and straighten your arms. Can't win! <G>

The bike _may_ be too big, or not set up right.

What bike and frame size do you have? How tall are you? What's your inside leg? That's basic. Fitting a bike really carefully is a science in itself. But you may be able to adapt either yourself or the bike if the problem is minor. I have. My wife has. We may have got better fits, but it's near enough that we enjoy riding, with a bit of adjustment.

Can you try moving the saddle back or forward to see if that helps? Can you adjust the height of the bars?

The bars height in relation to the saddle is very variable. I run about level, but many guys run with the saddle a good 3-4" over the bars. Naturally that is going to make bending the arms even more of a strain, both mental and physical, but I cannot argue with their decision, because it's "whatever works" (as long as you have tried other stuff first, so you know it _is_ working <G>)

If you know somebody that's into MTB then that's the way to go. But don't get "told" according to formula. Try the standard, but in the end you're the one with your bum in the saddle, and it's a very personal thing. (can't get much _more_ personal really ! <G>)

Nick
I'm 5'11 32 inseam. Ride a large Cannondale mtn bike.
Seat is slightly higher than the handlebars. I didn't adjust the seat yet to bring it forward, but it doesn't look like it can be brought forward too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Sorry. See my edit of my first post, regarding seat tilt. I did not realise you had replied.

Somebody with a Cannondale would need to address this, because every bike is different, and even sometimes models if they do not share frames.

You need to try all of the things I suggested, one by one and in various combinations. That includes simply trying not to straighten your arms for a while <G>

I am almost exactly your height and Inside Leg. Sorry. What isnide sleeve are you. What year and model are you riding? I will grab the frame geometry for my bike and yours and compare them

I am not a bike fitting expert <G>, but comparison of two simialr bodies and frames could help you.

Nick
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top