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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read different things.
I was measuring very regularly. I have 1 waiting.
10 S Shimano first day at .05
My cassette looks like new.
Thanks :thumbsup:
 

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Up In Smoke
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You should be able to measure 12" from the center of one pin to the center of another pin. If that's not the case its time for a new chain. If its well outside 12" you probably need a new cassette and chainring as well. When the teeth on the cassette or chainring look like shark fins, its probably too late.
 

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I have read different things.
I was measuring very regularly. I have 1 waiting.
10 S Shimano first day at .05
My cassette looks like new.
Thanks :thumbsup:
I have found that over the years you can get a feel for how long it is until the chain wears too much and just swap. Before kids I would get around 6 months per chain. Now, well, it is way too long between chains. My commuter though gets one every spring.
 

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There's two lines of thought on this...

Get yourself a chain wear tool.

When your chain hits 0.75 replace it.

You'll get 3 chains per cassette & chainring

The second train fo thought is...

Run the one chain with the one cassette/chainring & replace all three components when shifting goes to the crapper.

Here endeth the lesson.

Sent from my Nokia X6
 

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I have read different things.
I was measuring very regularly. I have 1 waiting.
10 S Shimano first day at .05
My cassette looks like new.
Thanks :thumbsup:
0.5% (or 12-1/16" on a 12" ruler) for 11/12 speed
0.75% (or 12-3/32" on a 12" ruler) for 9/10 speed

The "ruler" aficionados will say it's the only way, but I've always have had fine results with a Park tool.
 

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There's two lines of thought on this...

Get yourself a chain wear tool.

When your chain hits 0.75 replace it.

You'll get 3 chains per cassette & chainring

The second train fo thought is...

Run the one chain with the one cassette/chainring & replace all three components when shifting goes to the crapper.

Here endeth the lesson.

Sent from my Nokia X6
There's more than 2, another method is to just change them regularly. My (10-sp Shimano) mtb gets a fresh one about 3 times a year. I never measure it until I lay it next to the new one to cut to length. Never any drivetrain issues.
 

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A few derivative thoughts:

You should get about 3 chain-lifetimes from a cassette. Your crank's chain-rings should last much longer. (The only one I have ever really worn out is a 34T Ultegra.) Some crank chain-rings are steel, and will last a very long time.

Modern cassettes and chain-rings have lots of differently-shaped teeth on them to assist with shifting and chain retention, and therefore can give the false appearance of being worn when they are not.

In my experience, having a clean chain and using a dry (paraffin) lube that does not attract sand, can greatly extend the life of the drive-train. I buy three chains at once, wax them all, and rotate them in and out several times until all three are about equally worn. Then the chains and cassette can be replaced together.

If you put on a new chain and the noise, shifting, etc. get rougher or worse, it is probably time to change your cassette. If that does not work, then it might be the crank's chain-ring(s) (easy to test if you don't have a 1X).
 
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