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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, i'm in the process of building up my bike and am deciding between the following wheelsets (I'm around 165lbs and do mainly trailriding with some small jumps and light FR):-

1) Bring over my 1 1/2 year old wheels from my current bike: Sun Rhynolite XLs laced to 36 hole no name hubs (thru axle up front)
OR
2) 4 month old Mavic XM321s laced to 32 hole no name thru axle up front, DT swiss onyx rear??

The hubs on the Mavics are more attractive especially since i've gone through 2 freewheels & 1 rear hub on the Rhynolite. But i've also done a search and it seems that the XM321s are pinned while the rhynos are welded (better??) Personally, i quite like the rhynos which have stayed pretty true despite my hack landings though changing tires are killer... Never had any experience w/ Mavics..

So would really appreciate some advice, it seems to boil down to: better rims/weaker hubs (Sun) vs weaker rims/better hubs (Mavic)??...TIA :)
 

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freeride wheels

Look at the Mavic XM719 (old label F519) 24.5 mm wide and more important it is weled.
This rim builds well and if the CORRECT length spokes are used and the builder is competent the wheels should last a long time barring any crashes.
 

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I say, if you like your old wheels, rid'em till they're trashed, then get new ones. It doesn't seem like there is that much of a difference between the two sets. that being said, I have the xm321's and really like them. Plus, they are not too expensive (if they ever need replaced) or heavy. Most of the strength in a wheel comes from the quality of the build (even spoke tension, stressed spokes), not how beefy a rim is, within reason. -t
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the input...

But i've a few more questions (please bear with me) :D

I was doing a search and suddenly remembered about the rear wheel needing to be dished to accomodate the casssete as well. So here's the question: if both wheels had been built with 9 speed cassettes in mind and the hubs are of the same width and diameter, does that mean they will be equally dished and fit the bike without a hitch?? Are there any other factors that i have to take in to consideration with respect to dishing of the rear wheel?? Is it really just a simple swap i'm looking at or are there any hidden perils??

Guess a simple way would be to just put the wheels on the bike and give it a try but they have different disc rotor sizes and i currently dun have the torx tools to swap the 8" rotor out (bike only has the 6" adaptors)

While we're at it, do such dishing issues apply to the front wheel??

Appreciate your input :)
 

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Dishing………………

Dishing the rear wheels is done to center the wheel in the frame, It takes into consideration the width of the cassette and the disc mount. This requires two different length spokes and tensions on the rear wheel. The dishing in all post 7spd MTN bike wheels will be the same. Generally you will be able to mount any rear wheel in the back of your bike. You may need to make a little adjustment to your shifting and brake caliper aligments to accomodate minute differences between hub spacings but that should be all.

The front wheel has no dish. Being built of the same size spokes on both sides generally there is no offset or dish. Some times the fornt disc wheels can be offset requiring a small dish but usually OS 20mm hubs are completely dishless. The front wheel just like the rear may need to have a small adjustment to the brake caliper to account for minute spacing differences but that is all.

Good luck with your choice.
 
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