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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if I spelled it right but thats my question. How do you do a controlled wheelie? wheenever I get one at about the right hight my bike turns to the side. Does bike wieght matter? hand or feet position? please explain.
 

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bstguitarist said:
Not sure if I spelled it right but thats my question. How do you do a controlled wheelie? wheenever I get one at about the right hight my bike turns to the side. Does bike wieght matter? hand or feet position? please explain.
If you're concerned about wheelies for trail riding, the most important skill (IMO) is not whether you can wheelie for 50 feet, but rather whether you can lift the front wheel accurately and place it on top of an object.

I also occassionally turn to the side when attempting to wheelie for a long distance (say greater than 10 feet or so, which I never really have a need to do), I imagine that it is mostly practice and balance in that position- just like learning to trackstand, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! Speaking of trackstand! I really have trouble doing that HOw do I do it? I keep falling to one side or another.
 

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bstguitarist said:
Thanks! Speaking of trackstand! I really have trouble doing that HOw do I do it? I keep falling to one side or another.
It took me about a year to be able to trackstand reasonably well. I cheat- I lock my brakes, so its not a "pure" trackstand, but I can do it for minutes at a time on my best days. It takes practice, but it is a way critical skill to master- since I leaned the trackstand I almost never have slow speed falls on techy stuff anymore, and sharp turns and switchbacks are much easier.
 

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MTB Rider
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Pedal yank and ass

bstguitarist said:
Not sure if I spelled it right but thats my question. How do you do a controlled wheelie? wheenever I get one at about the right hight my bike turns to the side. Does bike wieght matter? hand or feet position? please explain.
First shift into higher gear. Then give the crank a good push. Yank back on the handle bars and keep your but plastered to the seat.

Alternatively, you can also preload the front and "bounce" the front wheel up which is more useful for clearing log obstacles.
 

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trackstands on the road are really just minute movements of the bike in order to balance just the same as when you are riding. By placing your front wheel on a bump or incline then turning the wheel slightly you can push your pedals lightly to move up the slope, then release your leg pressure and roll back down the slope, then push again, etc. This slight movement will allow you to balance almost indefinetely. This can be used in tech sections where you can apply your brakes and balance fleetingly as you prepare for the next section.

The version that Adirondack Blues does is more of the skill that you need to do long wheelies. This is pure balance. The same as standing on a ball. It requires deft concentration and control to balance with no movement. When wheelie-ing you can balance by pushing your knee's out from the plane of the bike in order to counter balance the way your bike is turning. You can also use your head to balance, just cock it to the side that is opposite the way you are steering. Sometimes a subtle turn of your bars out of the turn will also correct the leaning tendancies but this can totally unbalance you as well. Practice with the knees and head.
 

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'18 Transition Sentinel
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Wheelie terminology? - manual vs automatic

I always forget which is which, between "manual" & "automatic". Which one do I pedal with, and which one do I coast with? :eek:

Also, which one is easier to learn first?

Thanks,
- PiroChu
 

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bstguitarist said:
Thanks! Speaking of trackstand! I really have trouble doing that HOw do I do it? I keep falling to one side or another.
From http://biketrials.com/how-to/index.shtm

The very first thing to learn is the trackstand. This is where you balance on your bike, trying to move your wheels as little as possible. This is the hardest thing for most people to learn (at least for me it was), so don't get frustrated at yourself when you suck at it. It took me about 2 months, I think, before I could do it decently well. The most important thing is PRACTICE, the more you try to trackstand, the better you're going to get at it. You'll see, I promise...

Instruction
Find a slight uphill on concrete.

Figure out which foot is your "good" or "forward" or "chocolate" foot, the foot you are most comfortable having in front

Get on your bike and roll forward, put your good foot forward

Roll to a stop (don't use your brakes at all in this excerise)

Keep your pedals level with level ground (this goes for pretty much all the time in trials)

(so if you're on a hill, don't keep your pedals level with the hill, keep them level with imaginary level ground)

Turn your wheel opposite of your good foot about 45 degrees (left foot forward, turn right...)

(this isn't absolute, I'm left foot forward and I turn left...)

Try to maintain your position on the hill by pushing lightly on your front pedal

A rocking motion will probably help... Push on the pedal enough to go forward, then let off and roll back a bit. Rinse and repeat. Er, I mean repeat.

Keep your head way forward, almost over your front axle

Keep your arms close to locked straight

Keep your front leg pretty straight

Keep your back leg bent a little, and use it for balance along with turning your wheel and shifting whatever body mass you can around over the bike (sounds hard because it is, it will get natural after a lot of practice, only now after over a year of riding am I VERY comfortable with balancing on most anything)

Look about 6 feet forward, it's easier than looking straight down

And most important: RELAX! Don't be all tensed up, it's only going to make you really sore.
 

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Thanks for the detailed instructions ajw! My hubby and I have been working on trackstands little by little over the past few days. I think the point you made about letting yourself roll to a stop rather than braking is going to be a big help and it something that we've overlooked. We've also only been practicing on flat land in our back yard. Next time we go to the trails we'll try to find a cleanish hill without too many roots or obstacles to break our fall. :) We've been working on it with regular shoes, because our balance is just not good enough to even attempt it clipped in yet.

This is a skill that we both really want to have. Is the reasoning of practicing on a hill just easier for the beginner?

Thanks again!
Atty
 
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