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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yakima wheel fork is a pair of thin blades, that the QR won't bite unless I twist QR all the way in. Then I have to twist QR all the way out to put the wheel bacl on the bike. I maybe lazy, but I'm sure I'm not the first one to whine about it. Anybody DIY'ed a true QR wheel fork?
 

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Emu's Taste Like Chicken
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I took a yakima one, riveted a fender washer to it (to add thickness), then used a grinding wheel to whittle down the fork until it was the exact same thickness as the forks on the bike. Then I bought a new bike w/ a different fork. I think this time I will use JB weld to thicken the fork blades then grind it down.

happy wheel fork searching.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DIY'ed it

I don't have an access to weld, although that is an excellent idea. I cleaned the garage and found some parts in the box - so here it is. Why don't rack makers make something that actually works?



Come on, I know we aren't the only one!
 

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Emu's Taste Like Chicken
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How well does it hold the wheel side to side (like when turning?). That looks like a better way than the wheel fork, as I keep stabbing myself on my wheel forks everytime I climb in and out of the bed of my truck (rack goes accross the top of the bed walls). In the event you want to try it, JBweld is actually a two part playdough like stuff that when mushed together forms a rock hard mold, plus it bonds to most materials.

I agree though, we can't be the only ones tired of having to change the skewer length everytime we put the bike on the rack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Side to side

As you suspected, it flopped down when I made a turn. So I put in a second bolt under the rack clamp to secure the stand vertically. Now it holds upright. I should sell this thing at $50 or so! ;)
 
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