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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was about to order the Shimano PRO set, and figured I'd ask people more experienced what they prefer.

I need it for light maintenance.... Nothing major right now. This time around it's just stem and bars.

Thanks for any help

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've used several over the years, but I actually came across an inexpensive torque wrench on Amazon from Bikehand that has become my goto for bike work.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006WRWDWS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I like the 1/4" drive versatility.
Thanks, I'll take a look at it.

I've looked at Park ($120), Shimano ($90), and Venzo ($45).

I've read mixed reviews in regards to individual calibration. I dunno who to trust for carbon work, though I'm only installing a set of bars / stem right now.

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I've got a Shimano. It's my favorite because it's my only one & it works. Plus I got it on sale.
 

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I happen to be using a Snap On clicker 1/4" drive torque wrench that I got over 30 years ago. I mentioned in other threads how to easily verify a torque wrench's calibration, which is good to do with any wrench, new and after a period of use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I happen to be using a Snap On clicker 1/4" drive torque wrench that I got over 30 years ago. I mentioned in other threads how to easily verify a torque wrench's calibration, which is good to do with any wrench, new and after a period of use.
Do you by chance remember that thread title?

I'd love to read it!

I'm scared of going crunchy crunch on my carbon. From what I've read, some of these wrenches are off on calibration from the factory... Hence why I started this thread.

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Here's one post:

It's easy to check the calibration of a torque wrench. The way I do it put a socket vertically in a bench vise, put the torque wrench in it, and pull perpendicularly on the handle of the wrench with a string and fishing scale. Torque applied is the distance from the center of the socket to string on the handle multiplied by the force indicated on the scale. A spring type scale is way easier to use than a digital one because the digits aren't jumping around. And you can verify the fishing scale with known weights.

You need to get the units right of course. 2.2lb = 1 kg = 9.8 N. 1" = 2.54cm = .025 m.
 

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CDI <— Snap On’s industrial brand. Amazing quality and very affordable.
 

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This is what I use most frequently on the bikes. I also have 3/8" drive clicker types for higher torques (bottom brackets, lockrings etc.) I paid $120 or less for each of the CDI wrenches and they exceed the quality of any bike brand I have seen in person.

The bike wrenches are made by some tool company (usually a budget one) and are not equal in quality to professional models but are priced as such.

https://www.amazon.com/Products-TorqControl-TLA28NM-Screwdriver-Magnetic/dp/B01DIRD5CG
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Here's one post:

It's easy to check the calibration of a torque wrench. The way I do it put a socket vertically in a bench vise, put the torque wrench in it, and pull perpendicularly on the handle of the wrench with a string and fishing scale. Torque applied is the distance from the center of the socket to string on the handle multiplied by the force indicated on the scale. A spring type scale is way easier to use than a digital one because the digits aren't jumping around. And you can verify the fishing scale with known weights.

You need to get the units right of course. 2.2lb = 1 kg = 9.8 N. 1" = 2.54cm = .025 m.
Awesome. Thanks for posting.

Looks like CDI is getting some good recommendations.

After getting a lot of different recommendations, I picked up the Shimano for the work I need to perform ASAP. That being said, I do not trust it on carbon (yet at least). Looks like the CDI wrenches could be a good route for higher nM work including carbon. Thanks for the recommendations guys

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Awesome. Thanks for posting.

Looks like CDI is getting some good recommendations.

After getting a lot of different recommendations, I picked up the Shimano for the work I need to perform ASAP. That being said, I do not trust it on carbon (yet at least). Looks like the CDI wrenches could be a good route for higher nM work including carbon. Thanks for the recommendations guys

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the cdi works ok, tho it's pretty light and feels pretty cheap. the click you get when you reach the torque rating feels like im breaking something inside the torque wrench.
 

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the cdi works ok, tho it's pretty light and feels pretty cheap. the click you get when you reach the torque rating feels like im breaking something inside the torque wrench.
Out of curiosity, as compared with what other torque wrench do they feel light and as if they are going to break when used at their max torque setting?

As the industrial division of Snap-on, CDI's torque wrenches are sold to some of the most discerning and picky customers-federal government, large research and engineering organizations, aerospace-out there to be used hard on a daily basis while remaining on spec. In all cases that I'm aware of, the spring will eventually wear out, but if used and stored properly, this won't be for a very long time in a home shop. Also, keep in mind that using any torque wrench above 80% of its total torque scale is going to decrease its service life.

Snap-on is largely considered the cream of the crop in the tool world and this is not to say a snap-on wrench isn't a nicer wrench in hand with its finer-toothed-ratchet head, better warranty etc, but both CDI and Snap on are subject to set industrial standards and must be tested and certified prior to leaving the factory.

For the record, I'm not affiliated or invested in either of these tool brands or any other for that matter...
 

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here are the list of torque wrenches i have.

1. park tool atd(original version): feels very solid and well made, the click is satisfying

2. cdi torque wrench: works ok. just feels cheap as i've said earlier

3. venzo brand, looks like the spin doctor wrench: meh just felt cheap, gave it away to a friend.

4. park tool adjustable 0-14nm: feels solid in the hand, i wish the click was a lil more crisp

5. park tool big one 10 to like 50ish NM: very heavy duty, clicks much more solid than the smaller park tool

6. tekton big wrench: much like the big park tool

7. topeak electronic mini wrench: feels well made. i do NOT like the ratching feature, but the beep noise is nice to have.

i use the topeak the most, just to hit the stem bolts and stuff. then the park tool adjustable and park tool atd. barely even ever touch the cdi. the big ones are only for cassette and bb usually.
 

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I've got about four different ones but last year I bought an Effetto Mariposa G2 and I like it. It's small enough to fit into tight places and for you to be able to 'feel' the torque you're applying but it feels solid and well made. Supposed to be quite accurate too. I got the one without the ratchet head as the ratched head is bigger.

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
here are the list of torque wrenches i have.

1. park tool atd(original version): feels very solid and well made, the click is satisfying
I didn't go with the available Park as I read that they're contracted out and aren't the same as the older models. I read VERY mixed reviews on all of the torque wrenches that I didn't have to search for.

I betcha that there are different grades of Park torque wrenches. No way they'd blow their reputation on cracked carbon. Pretty sure my LBS uses park wrenches for installs.

Gonna have to do more homework

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I didn't go with the available Park as I read that they're contracted out and aren't the same as the older models.
I've always found Park Tools a hit and a miss. Some are very good, some are average or even below average for the money. I certainly don't think they represent any kind of gold standard as the tools tend to be crude or overpriced.
 

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I just got a fixed 4Nm Prestacycle from amazon for $15, and it's super handy, - they are slightly more expensive now at $16.95.
https://www.amazon.com/Prestacycle-...prefix=prestacycle,aps,261&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

I'm finding that my 4Nm tool is plenty for securing road bars. IMO 3Nm will be plenty for mtb flat or riser bars (all carbon bars, with carbon assembly paste of course), shifters and brakes. I plan to get a 3Nm, I think I'll be all set with those and the bigger adjustable torque wrench can sit in it's case.
 

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the cdi works ok, tho it's pretty light and feels pretty cheap. the click you get when you reach the torque rating feels like im breaking something inside the torque wrench.
Im curious what model you have? My CDI torque wrench is almost identical to the snapon wrenches in look and feel. Its very solid steel with a definitive click. Its also considerably heavy! At least double the weight of my craftsman one.

I bought a ritchey torquey for $25. Then I saw CDI's online for $20 and really wish I shopped around more. The ritchey is alright though, just ergonomically poor.
 
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