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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is riding on a trail whether it is dirt or pebbles and as wide as 5 yards considered XC? or must it be a bumpy trail with weeds and grass and bushes with a width of 2 feet. Riding on the side of a hill or through the woods??? Cruising at slow speeds or ripping like a bat out of hell???

Is this cross countrying?? What are the levels or mountain biking??
 

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Glad to Be Alive
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LOK said:
Is riding on a trail whether it is dirt or pebbles and as wide as 5 yards considered XC? or must it be a bumpy trail with weeds and grass and bushes with a width of 2 feet. Riding on the side of a hill or through the woods??? Cruising at slow speeds or ripping like a bat out of hell???

Is this cross countrying?? What are the levels or mountain biking??
just have fun, but yeah it is all XC....
 

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Freshly Fujified
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This might help

From Marzocchi's web site, these definitions of riding styles are used do define the intended use of each of their forks. There will be dissention as to the accuracy of the definitions, but it should be a nice baseline to start with. To me, personally, the definitions make sense.

Bob

Cross Country (XC)/Marathon: Riding along hilly trails where some bumps and smaller obstacles, such as rocks, roots, or depressions, may be encountered. XC riding does not include jumps or "drops" (riding off rocks, fallen trees or ledges) from any height. XC forks must only be used with tires specifically designed for cross country riding, or disk, rim or linear pull brakes.

All Mountain (AM): Riding BASED WITH more emphasis on aggressive XC riding WITH larger obstacles. AM RIDING DOES NOT INCLUDE LARGE JUMPS OR DROPS. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Trekking: Trekking is similar to XC riding but not as aggressive as XC. It involves slower riding and no riding obstacles such as rocks, roots, or depressions. You should only attach generators and racks to the designated mounting points provided on the forks. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

FreeRide (FR): This riding style is for skilled riders and involves aggressive slopes, large obstacles, and moderate jumps. Free Ride forks should be used only with disk brakes as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for Free Riding. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Dirt Jumper (DJ) / Urban Riding: This "BMX" or "motocross" style riding is only for the most skilled riders and involves jumping from one mound of dirt to another. It also includes riding over and around "urban obstacles" such as man-made or other concrete structures. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.

Down Hill (DH) / Extreme Free Ride: This discipline is only for professional or highly skilled riders. It includes for relatively high jumps or "drops" and negotiating larger obstacles such as boulders, fallen trees or holes. These forks should be used only with disk brakes, as well as frames, wheels and other components specifically designed for this riding style. The disk brakes must be attached to the designated mounting points provided on the fork. Never make any modification to your fork to attach any equipment.
 

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A wheelist
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fred3 said:
Who the he11 are you? :)
A geographical genius of course!

Glad to hear from you. Still waking up on the proper side of the grass I see.
Barely Fred! I'm just coming to the end of the worst case of bad back of my life. Sigh. It got me out of lots of snow shovelling though :D

Achilles tendon surgery next month.
Oooo! Ouch! I wish you well Fred. That's stop you shootin' hoops in the driveway for a while eh?
 

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inner peace to make peace
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LOK said:
Is riding on a trail whether it is dirt or pebbles and as wide as 5 yards considered XC? or must it be a bumpy trail with weeds and grass and bushes with a width of 2 feet. Riding on the side of a hill or through the woods??? Cruising at slow speeds or ripping like a bat out of hell???

Is this cross countrying?? What are the levels or mountain biking??
there' really four classes of bikes

I. road bikes -- that ride on paved roads (road race, cyclocross, townbike, track bike, criterium bike, comfort bikes, touring bikes, cruisers).

II. xc mountain bikes -- climbs, jumps, and descends paved or on off-road: hills, mountains (hardtail bikes, fill suspension, all-mountain) - these are teh most versatile, perhaps the most fun - kind of bikes from $250~$6000

III downhill bikes -- off-road bikes that're set up for descends or big jumps or both, but some stronger riders climb with them also (downhill race bikes, freeride bkes)

IV trials/BMX -- not as fast, but tough jumper tricksters, on or off-road

the best bike is the one you've paid for by cash, actually ride alot, and can afford to replace if crashed too hard or got stolen even though you locked it to something immobile..

if you can finish one xc mtb race for Beginners Class, then you're clearly a xc mountain biker, with a strong "heart".
 
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