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Fart smeller
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Tried gasoline before and all it did was muck up my chain lube.

Thanks.
 

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I ride in the desert and the chain gets really dirty all the time so I recently pruchased some Rock and Roll Extreme (blue) cleaner/lube. This stuff cleans my chain well, to where it looks new. I use it every 3-5 rides. Just stream it on and rotate the crank
for a min or so then use a rag to wipe off and I wipe til there is no more black on the rag.
 

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Assuming this isn't a troll thread, SRAM recommends you leave the super special factory gunk on. Gasoline works great as a mounthwash too.:rolleyes: SRAM also isn't in favor of using Simple Green or other de-greasers because they can remove the lube in the inner workings of the chain.
 

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DeForest Stump
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sopwithcamel said:
Don't use simple green as it embrittles metal! Use a mechanical chain cleaner with citris degreaser...
Isn't simple green a citrus degreaser? Color me confused.
 

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Use mineral spirits or paint thinner. It works great for removing the grease that comes on Shimano chains. Soak the whole chain in it for a few hours.
 

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Walt Dizzy said:
Link please?

Walt
Rather than searching and re-posting links, here is a thread from a few years ago.

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=253813&highlight=simple

This has been beat up here several times. It seems pretty unlikely that you you would experience problems from washing a chain and then rinsing it. The problems with Simple Green and chain failures I have read about involved examples where the chain was left to soak in the Simple Green for extended periods of time.

Regardless, it can't be argued that Simple Green is known to cause corrosion of metal and this is particularly true with aluminum. I have personally seen it etch bare aluminum surfaces and change the look of some anodized parts. I don't use the stuff on my bikes.

Lots of people use Simple Green every day to clean their bikes with no problems. We use it a fair amount at work for breaking up oily film and oily dirt on stuff. It works pretty good, but I don't use it on aluminum.
 

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Hey Walt,

Here is the link:

http://www.mechanicsupport.com/aircraft_cleaning.html

Simple Green is highly alkaline so you need to becareful with it.

To there credit Simple Green has come out with some new products but I haven't tried them yet. Simply because I just haven't the need too. Blue Dawn dish washing soap is cheap, enviromentally friendly and does a great job cleaning my bike. Blue Dawn and Lemon Pledge are the mechanics secret weapons.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGcZrqP4f98&feature=player_embedded

http://www.simplegreen.com/products_bike.php
 

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Finch Platte said:
Tried gasoline before and all it did was muck up my chain lube.

Thanks.
Here is what I do and it works very well.

I first soak the chain in a small amount of WD40. Shake it around a bit and dump out wd40 and repeat. I do this about 3 times. I wipe off chain with rag as best I can and then repeat process with simple green a few times. Chain comes out very clean.
Simple green does not remove the factory grease very well but WD40 is excellent.

I have used simple green on my bikes full strength from time to time with no ill effects but I did use purple power stuff one time and it did mess with the finish.
 

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Water Displacement WD40 has no bussiness being used on a high performance bicycle. It's a poor degreaser, poor pentrating oil, and poor lubricant. It will do in an emergency but there are much better products for each of those catagories.
 

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11 Bravo said:
Regardless, it can't be argued that Simple Green is known to cause corrosion of metal and this is particularly true with aluminum. I have personally seen it etch bare aluminum surfaces and change the look of some anodized parts. I don't use the stuff on my bikes.
Easy solution = ride steel. :thumbsup:
 

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sopwithcamel said:
Hey Walt,

Here is the link:

http://www.mechanicsupport.com/aircraft_cleaning.html

Simple Green is highly alkaline so you need to becareful with it.

To there credit Simple Green has come out with some new products but I haven't tried them yet. Simply because I just haven't the need too. Blue Dawn dish washing soap is cheap, enviromentally friendly and does a great job cleaning my bike. Blue Dawn and Lemon Pledge are the mechanics secret weapons.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGcZrqP4f98&feature=player_embedded

http://www.simplegreen.com/products_bike.php
Thanks for the info.

Please note that any soap or detergent has the potential to etch aluminum. Aluminum is an a highly reactive metal and it can be attacked by either acid or base. Or even salt in water. Steel is stable with regards to base (cast iron engine blocks are degreased in vats of lye), but can be attacked by acid.

Easiest way to think of it, if it dissolves in water, don't leave it on the bike.

Chains can be safely stored in non-polar solvents like kerosene or mineral spirits.

BTW, I'm a chemist.

Walt
 

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Walt Dizzy said:
Thanks for the info.

Please note that any soap or detergent has the potential to etch aluminum. Aluminum is an a highly reactive metal and it can be attacked by either acid or base. Or even salt in water. Steel is stable with regards to base (cast iron engine blocks are degreased in vats of lye), but can be attacked by acid.

Easiest way to think of it, if it dissolves in water, don't leave it on the bike.

Chains can be safely stored in non-polar solvents like kerosene or mineral spirits.

BTW, I'm a chemist.

Walt
I'll take you suggestion and stick with kerosene. Thanks for the tips
 

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What I do with Shimano chains:
- wipe the exterior with a rag, maybe even use some WD-40, or equivalent, on the rag (not sprayed on the chain). This leaves the greasy stuff on the insides of the chain.
- apply some non-sticky lube on top. Lately I've been using some waxy stuff.
 

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Zoke2 said:
I use ProLink, it gets rid of the original thick stuff and lubes the chain at the same time

this works for me... Prolink will remove the sticky factory stuff and lube the chain. Do it on the bike...no reason to soak or wash. No risk of drying out the chain and leaving the metal bare.
 

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This was a Question about a new Chain! Not Aluminum!

sopwithcamel said:
Water Displacement WD40 has no bussiness being used on a high performance bicycle. It's a poor degreaser, poor pentrating oil, and poor lubricant. It will do in an emergency but there are much better products for each of those catagories.
I knew my comment would bring out the lube elitists...
Thanks for that...Not but I will use my 25+ years of wrenching on cars and all things and using WD40 for many many things as confirmation of it's capability. It works well in many capacities. I don't use it as a chain lube, I use squirt on a freshly cleaned chain following my method which works perfectly.
And it degreases new chains very well and is cheap and easily acquired as is simple green.

We are talking about a unprotected steel chain here people not a raw aluminum bike frame. Understand folks, A raw steel chain not a platinum necklace..
 
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