Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm having trouble trying to decide what method is best for overcoming a 26-28" diameter log laying in the path of the trail. The layout of the trail doesn't allow for hopping over the log unless you want to case your bike. I've tried finessing the front tire onto the log and then attempting to bring the rear up and over the log but I end up nosediving on the other side. So I'm thinking next time I'm going to bring the front wheel up onto the log, and endoing the rear around so it sits on the log(which is perpendicular to the trail) and then doing a 90 deg. hop off.

I don't know if you can understand this, and I know it is hard to imagine but how would you handle this situation if you can't hop the log. The log is right after a hairpin and slightly on an uphill grade, so this is why hopping is somewhat impossible.

This part of the trail hasnt' been used since the tree fell, so I'm not the only one having problems with this.

PH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I know what your thinking...

You're probably thinking that it would be just as easy to get off the bike and step over the log. That would be too easy and I know it can be done, just haven't figured it out yet. I was hoping someone would be able to give me some kind of advice on this?

PH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah, you could say I'm stubborn...

RonSonic said:
I was gonna say do it cyclocross style.

I gotta respect your stubborn, but even at 6'2 with longish legs I' can't think up an elegant way to do this. Can you plant one foot and swing the bike and other leg over?

Ron
I'm 6'2 as well and I never thought of the "cyclocross style", but it's still cheating.

I will admit it, I was laughing my arse off when I read that post.

Maybe bring a chainsaw with me on my next ride and cut out a section? :D

PH
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
48,238 Posts
PavementHater said:
I'm 6'2 as well and I never thought of the "cyclocross style", but it's still cheating.

I will admit it, I was laughing my arse off when I read that post.

Maybe bring a chainsaw with me on my next ride and cut out a section? :D

PH
My first thought was "chainsaw".

I have cleared logs that large CX-style , plus a little steepchase form. Flying dismount. Lift the bike and "hurdle" to step on top of the log. Push off. Set bike on ground and flying remount. Has served me well in a couple of races

Is this a multi-user trail or mainly a mtb trail?

If multi, cut out the log.

If not, a log pile can be fun. Find smaller downed logs to stack up on either side of the big log to create ramps. May need to use wooden stakes (1-2" branches) to anchor them in place. The fewer logs and steeper the ramps, the more challenging the log pile.
Log piles are not good for hikers or horses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
253 Posts
log pile or pack some mud in front to build a ramp to launch over it. OR bring a board and nails next time. This makes for a lot more fun then taking a chainsaw to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
PavementHater said:
I'm having trouble trying to decide what method is best for overcoming a 26-28" diameter log laying in the path of the trail. The layout of the trail doesn't allow for hopping over the log unless you want to case your bike. I've tried finessing the front tire onto the log and then attempting to bring the rear up and over the log but I end up nosediving on the other side. So I'm thinking next time I'm going to bring the front wheel up onto the log, and endoing the rear around so it sits on the log(which is perpendicular to the trail) and then doing a 90 deg. hop off.

I don't know if you can understand this, and I know it is hard to imagine but how would you handle this situation if you can't hop the log. The log is right after a hairpin and slightly on an uphill grade, so this is why hopping is somewhat impossible.

This part of the trail hasnt' been used since the tree fell, so I'm not the only one having problems with this.

PH
That method would probably work. Might take some practice. Here's how I would do it. Try to hit it with just a little speed at like 35 degrees from straight on, whichever direction you are more comfortable with swinging your rear around. Loft your front wheel up on the log then with the help of your front brake, swing your back wheel up on the log. Once you're up there you can either hop off sideways or do a mini wheely drop.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,583 Posts
PavementHater said:
I'm having trouble trying to decide what method is best for overcoming a 26-28" diameter log laying in the path of the trail. The layout of the trail doesn't allow for hopping over the log unless you want to case your bike. I've tried finessing the front tire onto the log and then attempting to bring the rear up and over the log but I end up nosediving on the other side. So I'm thinking next time I'm going to bring the front wheel up onto the log, and endoing the rear around so it sits on the log(which is perpendicular to the trail) and then doing a 90 deg. hop off.

I don't know if you can understand this, and I know it is hard to imagine but how would you handle this situation if you can't hop the log. The log is right after a hairpin and slightly on an uphill grade, so this is why hopping is somewhat impossible.

This part of the trail hasnt' been used since the tree fell, so I'm not the only one having problems with this.

PH
Turn half of it into a pyramid so others can ride it. Leave a section beside the pyramid so you can practice until you can ride it as-is. Oh, getting a 29" wheeled singlespeed helps too. Keep practicing, you can get it!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Is that possible without a single speed???

ok,

I know I could do that with my BMX, but man that looks rough if you're riding over the log.

That looks like it could do some damage to my gears...

Are you rolling over that log? I know my bike would be cased if I tried that, which would put it out of comission for awhile. If you are getting over those logs without rubbing nothing but rubber, you must be a machine.

Nice pics...

PH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,583 Posts
PavementHater said:
ok,

I know I could do that with my BMX, but man that looks rough if you're riding over the log.

That looks like it could do some damage to my gears...

Are you rolling over that log? I know my bike would be cased if I tried that, which would put it out of comission for awhile. If you are getting over those logs without rubbing nothing but rubber, you must be a machine.

Nice pics...

PH
It's easier without a big ring, but you can have gears (if you must). ;) The bigger logs are actually easier to roll over, since the curvature of the log prevents your rings from hitting it. The trick is to get that front tire right on top of the log, tap the front brake to get the rest of the bike coming upwards, then LUNGE up onto it. As your front wheel nears the ground, pull it forward so it doesn't bury itself into the ground. Easier said than done, but I occasionally spend time practicing this move on ideal logs just so I can ride the ones I find on the trail.
 

·
Shamisen Appreciator
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
EMeister said:
Then practice your pedal-ups. Exactly like a "j-hop" but you're putting power down to the pedals as you perform it. Back when I was riding trials a lot, I could up a 42 wall from a bike-length straight to back wheel...no bashguard, no pedals. Best way to learn it, is to practice your pedal-up to back wheel on small objects first (like a parking block) when you're just tooling around. A lot of times, locking your back brake for a moment when you hit the apex of the obstacle helps keep you under control.

This is obviously going to depend on a lot of factors. Seat height being one of the most obvious. It's very difficult (if not impossible) to do a huge pedal-up with an extended seat post. I was at the point where I could regularly clean 34" or so on my MTB with a fully extended seat.

Keep practicing and trying new techniques and you'll get it.

Nat...I can't wait until we get to OR (moving into the house on June 9th) so I can head down to Bend and check out the local trails. I'll certainly need to brush up on my skills and even more so for fitness.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,583 Posts
smudge said:
Nat...I can't wait until we get to OR (moving into the house on June 9th) so I can head down to Bend and check out the local trails. I'll certainly need to brush up on my skills and even more so for fitness.
Hey right on. Check in on the OR board when you get here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,843 Posts
Nat said:
It's easier without a big ring, but you can have gears (if you must). ;) The bigger logs are actually easier to roll over, since the curvature of the log prevents your rings from hitting it. The trick is to get that front tire right on top of the log, tap the front brake to get the rest of the bike coming upwards, then LUNGE up onto it. As your front wheel nears the ground, pull it forward so it doesn't bury itself into the ground. Easier said than done, but I occasionally spend time practicing this move on ideal logs just so I can ride the ones I find on the trail.
Cheater, you're clipped in!

Seriously though, I like the idea of "ramping" only part of the tree/log, to leave options based on ability. I find the problem with that is anchoring shorter logs, full length stay in place better. What do you do to keep them from shifting around?
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top