Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased this bike in college and rode it a ton then...lots of mud, roots, etc (Kansas river levees). Now, years later, I want to get back on it and do some desert trails around where I live (Cave Creek, AZ). My parents were looking for gift ideas for me and I thought about upgrading the bike or at the very minimum, bring it into the 21st century. I enjoy trails with some up/downhill. Not a big jumper. Not into competing. Definitely will be getting new tires and tubes.

1993 or 1994 Nishiki Colorado 20"
Shimano Exage 500 LX components
Cantilever brakes
No suspension anywhere
Pedals have cages
Other entry-level stuff for seatpost, seat, head, etc.

What would you upgrade with the understanding that if I get back into this, I will probably replace the bike in a year or so?
 

·
Freshly Fujified
Joined
·
8,199 Posts
Check the Retro/Classic forum

With all due respect, there has been so much change in the past 10 years tha there may not be a whole lot to be recommended for the bike. My initial thoughts might be to add some front suspension (if it can be found) or perhaps a new pair of cantilever brakes, pads and/or levers. Given the age of the bike, toss the question out to the Retro/Classic forum and see what they have to say. Could be they recommend to keep the bike as is if it is of any value to a collector.

Just my 2 cents
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Call_me_Clyde said:
With all due respect, there has been so much change in the past 10 years tha there may not be a whole lot to be recommended for the bike. My initial thoughts might be to add some front suspension (if it can be found) or perhaps a new pair of cantilever brakes, pads and/or levers. Given the age of the bike, toss the question out to the Retro/Classic forum and see what they have to say. Could be they recommend to keep the bike as is if it is of any value to a collector.

Just my 2 cents
I posted in the vintage forum...thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
344 Posts
If it were me...Just tune it up & ride it.

At its age, I really wouldn't upgrade anything unless parts are broken, IMO it's just not worth it. Have fun on it & if you realize the bike is what's holding you back, buy a new bike like you plan too.
 

·
Time is not a road.
Joined
·
4,150 Posts
Listen to these guys...where's your upgrade spirit?!

If you really wanted to upgrade, really, really, I might recommend a new set of wheels. Even if you went with a lighter rim now and disc-ready hubs, this is something that you could take off the old bike and put on the new one. You could aim high with the knowledge that you'll be keeping the wheels - CK, Hope, Hadley, DT Swiss, etc. Also, I'd add a new cassette, new chain and maybe some chainrings depending on wear. That would freshen up the drivetrain. Tune it, ride it.
 

·
Adobo Lover
Joined
·
985 Posts
lol That's the spirit. The bike would remind me of a big very old caddy with bling "e" rims that are worth more than the car. :) I guess it all depends on what your next bike will be. If your going to spend around 300-400 for your next bike, then it's probably worth sticking with the bike you have and get better rolling wheels and upgrade the drivetrain. Nishiki's are classics.
 

·
Ride on
Joined
·
639 Posts
think twice about wheels

chad1433 said:
Listen to these guys...where's your upgrade spirit?!

If you really wanted to upgrade, really, really, I might recommend a new set of wheels. Even if you went with a lighter rim now and disc-ready hubs, this is something that you could take off the old bike and put on the new one. You could aim high with the knowledge that you'll be keeping the wheels - CK, Hope, Hadley, DT Swiss, etc. Also, I'd add a new cassette, new chain and maybe some chainrings depending on wear. That would freshen up the drivetrain. Tune it, ride it.
I have a bike that is about the same age. It uses a 7 speed cassette. As far as I can tell it also uses 130mm rear hub spacing. Neither of these standards are used on any decent modern bike, which all have 9 speed cassettes and 135mm spacing. Upgrading these items could be a dead end. And replacing the cassette is pointless without replacing the chainrings and chain, which adds up to some serious dollars.

The problems don't end there. This bike probably also has cantilever brakes, which are obsolete. But newer linear brakes and disc brakes aren't compatible with cantilever levers, and IIRC Exage shifters and brake levers are integrated. There are adapters that will convert the leverage ratio of canti levers to linear brakes, but that adds cost and complexity.

And the fun continues. This bike probably has a 1" threaded headset. Finding a 1" threaded suspension fork is tough. 1" threadless forks are easier to find, but then you need a new headset and stem, and don't forget a cable guide for your canti brake. And a fork with a 1" steerer cannot be moved to a newer bike, since the new standard steerer is 1 1/8".

I'm sure you can find all of these parts if you look hard enough, but is it worth spending cash on upgrades that cannot be transferred to a newer bike? I'd rather save my cash and use it on an entire new bike.
 

·
Wolf nipple chips
Joined
·
504 Posts
Nishiki's aren't classics.

I agree with Clyde, there has been SOOOO much change in mountain bikes in the past decade that you will not only spend less on a new bike, but you'll be almost guaranteed to enjoy it more. That is, unless you are incredibly in love with the thing and can't BEAR to replace it. My recoomendation: keep the Nishiki, but convert it to a singlespeed! then get a newer geared bike.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top