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wowzers, you riding like 300km+ a week. get another bike for commuting. Its worth it for that much riding.

Front rigid is overrated for trails imo. It's a lot slower descending, and it's hard on your body. Suspension forks $200, your elbows priceless.
 

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I rode only rigid last year (Niner MCR and Niner carbon fork). Now I have built myself a new hard tail and plan on converting the MCR to single-speed keeping the rigid fork.

I had a great time riding that bike. Yes, descending is more difficult and slower. You have to pick a line and you will want to slow down for some features. Washboards are torture. However, climbing on a rigid bike is a joy and you learn to move your body to compensate for lack of active suspension. But you have to keep in mind that I did everything on that bike to make it as compliant as possible: steel frame, tubeless at 22 psi, rigid but carbon fork. My new ride (100mm) is more compliant but it's not night and day.

Try it -- you might like it.
 

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ah no, I guess that's not right then, at least in terms of distance. Right now I'm doing about 160k a week to work and back. 30km each day. That's true I didn't think of the fact that it would be harder on the elbows.
Yeah, it would be harder on the elbows indeed. Take a look at the used market, I am sure you will find a good deal if you dig deep enough :)
 

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I ride a rigid bike quite a bit. On flow trails without much in the way of rocks it's fine, lots of fun. So easy to get air off roots etc. High speed downhills are rough, swear your eyeballs are going to vibrate right out. Never really noticed my elbows being a problem - light hands, heavy feet you know.
Great for rail trails and such.
Just took the suspension fork off my 26er since it's my spring training bike. Only on paved and gravel trails until things dry up.
Rigid forks are cheap - give it a try.
 

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I suggest you use the Search page on this forum and search for threads with the word "rigid" in the title. there are dozens of threads discussing rigid forks.

for your situation, be sure that, if you switch to a rigid fork, be certain that the fork you use is of similar length to the suspension fork that you have now. most rigid mtb forks are "suspension corrected," for a certain length, which basically means that the length mimics the average length of an uncompressed suspension fork. if you put a fork on that's not suspension corrected, it will drop the height of your handlebar by an inch or more and screw up your handling.
 

· Fat-tired Roadie
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If you have it around, try it.

The first time I rode a rigid fork on trails, I was surprised at how little difference it made at "cruising" speed. I'd borrowed the bike for a race, and there was a root bed that was a bit of a beating on each lap when I was riding like I meant it. That particular course didn't have a lot of elevation change, though.

Depending on your trails, 40k can be a lot... is the suspension fork really effecting your commute? It's not like anyone will give you a prize for showing up at work one minute sooner.
 

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ah no, I guess that's not right then, at least in terms of distance. Right now I'm doing about 160k a week to work and back. 30km each day. That's true I didn't think of the fact that it would be harder on the elbows.
this is still a lot of ride and I think it's very worthwhile to have one bike for commuting, one bike for the trails.
 

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I rode rigid for a long time it's just fine on trails. Where is all this elbow stuff coming from? If anything it was my wrists that got fatigued. One thing that helps on a rigid bike is running nice fat tires.

Anyway maybe I'm just reading between the lines but if you're going to ride on trails make sure you buy a trail bike (regardless of the fork that it comes with) and not a hybrid or multi road or comfort bike. You want to be able to run fat mountain tires for mountain bike riding along with having proper mountain bike geometry. Hybrid bikes are good on road and useless off road.
 
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