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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I am looking to get a torque wrench and I am looking at Parks TW-1 and TW-2.

Most of the work I will be doing is light work.

eg: Seatpost, seat clamp, stem handlebar clamp, handlebar break clamp, handlebar gear clamp etc.

My seatpost clamp requires 10-12Nm.

Will the Park TW1 handle most of these ranges?

Thanks
 

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Your seatpost clamp is outside the range of the TW-1. The specs for both the TW-1 and TW-2 are on the Park Tool website...

TW-1

TW-2

TW-1 is 0-7 Nm, 0-60 in./lbs.

TW-2 is 0-70 Nm, 0-600 in./lbs.
 

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i just looked in on this thread because i was wondering what kind of complicated work you were doing that would require you to own a torque wrench. I'm generally under the assumption that i don't need a torque wrench ,well maybe for assembling a motor,connecting rods, headbolts,stuff like that. However recently i bought a giant carbon stem for my road bike and i just put it on and went riding ,on the second ride i hit a solid bump and the handlebars shifted with a loud creak/pop, i looked down and the torque specs are printed right on the stem, i revised my planned ride to spin by my local bike shop,i'm 30 year friends with the owner. I borrowed the torque wrench, set it on the recommended setting and started tightening,it didn't seem to want to click. I called over to the head mechanic(owners brother) to find out if the wrench actually works right. He came over and we backed off on the torque setting just a bit and it clicked, we decided to leave it at that. The point of this (hardly) little story is there are very few things in bicycling that actually require torque wrenches. I may have used one on rotor bolts when i first got disc brakes,12 years ago,havn't bothered since.I've never had a problem with improper torque on something that i remembered to tighten:). If you tighten things sensably you'll probabely be ok,but if you have to own a torque wrench knock yourself out. If you need a shopping list of specialized bike tools that are more important than a torque wrench; deraileur hanger alignment tool,spoke tensionometer,freewheel lockring tool/chain whip,there are a couple others that depend on the type of headset and bottombracket that are on your bike.
 

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herbn said:
i just looked in on this thread because i was wondering what kind of complicated work you were doing that would require you to own a torque wrench. I'm generally under the assumption that i don't need a torque wrench ,well maybe for assembling a motor,connecting rods, headbolts,stuff like that. However recently i bought a giant carbon stem for my road bike and i just put it on and went riding ,on the second ride i hit a solid bump and the handlebars shifted with a loud creak/pop, i looked down and the torque specs are printed right on the stem, i revised my planned ride to spin by my local bike shop,i'm 30 year friends with the owner. I borrowed the torque wrench, set it on the recommended setting and started tightening,it didn't seem to want to click. I called over to the head mechanic(owners brother) to find out if the wrench actually works right. He came over and we backed off on the torque setting just a bit and it clicked, we decided to leave it at that. The point of this (hardly) little story is there are very few things in bicycling that actually require torque wrenches. I may have used one on rotor bolts when i first got disc brakes,12 years ago,havn't bothered since.I've never had a problem with improper torque on something that i remembered to tighten:). If you tighten things sensably you'll probabely be ok,but if you have to own a torque wrench knock yourself out. If you need a shopping list of specialized bike tools that are more important than a torque wrench; deraileur hanger alignment tool,spoke tensionometer,freewheel lockring tool/chain whip,there are a couple others that depend on the type of headset and bottombracket that are on your bike.
The same reason you would use a torque wrench to assembly an engine is the same reason you use a torque wrench on a bicycle.

You even confirmed it your self when the handle bars you installed with out using a torque wrench came loose. What if that had happened on a gnarly DH section.

Today's light weight, higher precision parts require the use of a torque more than ever.
 

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herbn said:
The point of this (hardly) little story is there are very few things in bicycling that actually require torque wrenches.
Wow... :rolleyes:

If I roll back the clock to 1991 when I was riding a 35 pound trek with giant motorcycle size brake levers I might be able to agree with you. But in the current times I prefer to not break nice new parts I buy or have the pivot bolts on my frame come loose when I'm miles out in the woods.
 

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KleinAttitude said:
hmmm is there a wrench that will do most of the range. Or will I have to buy two?

Thanks
yes, craftsman has one that is around $70 that covers 20-250 in lbs.
 

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bars didn't come loose ,they moved the littlest bit,and it's a pretty exotic part on a road bike......... i guess you need both torque wrenches,parks probabely arn't good enough,go with snap on.
 

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92gli said:
yes, craftsman has one that is around $70 that covers 20-250 in lbs.
not accurate under about 70 inch/lbs.. as long as you use it over that, (20-100% of its range) its fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I need an accurate Torque Wrench for the light jobs.

eg: 0 - 10nm So what wrench will be best for that?

And then I need somethig from 10nm upwards to a a sensbile upper limit.
 

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I don't have a good picture of it (this is the one off the eBay auction I won), but a 0-150 inch-pound dial torque is perfect for most low-torque bike fasteners, and can be had for $30-40 if you're a patient bidder.

This S&K wrench would normally go for $150-200 new. I wanted to be certain it was in good shape, so took it to a local calibration shop who tested it and gave it a clean bill of health.

What I like about the dial torque is it's got none of the complicated innards that a click-type wrench has (coil spring, balls & detent, ratchet), and instead uses a bending beam much like a beam-type torque wrench, combined with a dial indicator. It's all neatly tucked away inside the protective casing, and calibration is a matter of setting the dial to '0'.

And unlike the problem a previous poster experienced, the dial gives you an instant and real-time torque read-out, so there's little chance of over-torquing an already properly torqued bolt, or missing a soft click as can happen on some click-type wrenches.

 

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KleinAttitude said:
Park tools TW-1 would do most of my needs. But its expensive for a beam wrench.

This bream wrench http://www.tooled-up.com/Product.asp?PID=15604

Is a 1/4 of the price of the TW-1 and works for 0-150lbs. But the gauge is not in nm.
This one is 150 foot-pounds (not inch-pounds). Way too high for anything on a bike.

I don't know why these lower range torque wrenches are so expensive. Maybe because they aren't as in demand as the higher ranges?

I just browsed the eBay UK site and it looks like slim pickings. But I'm sure there are a handful of US sellers who would be happy to ship internationally but don't advertise it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Speedub.Nate said:
This one is 150 foot-pounds (not inch-pounds). Way too high for anything on a bike.

I don't know why these lower range torque wrenches are so expensive. Maybe because they aren't as in demand as the higher ranges?

I just browsed the eBay UK site and it looks like slim pickings. But I'm sure there are a handful of US sellers who would be happy to ship internationally but don't advertise it.
I cant find anything useful for small tolerances. I need a beam wrench that will do 0nm - 10nm of there abouts.

And then something that will do 10nm to 80nm maybe.

Are the Park Tool TW-1 and TW2 my best bet?
 

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KleinAttitude said:
Are the Park Tool TW-1 and TW2 my best bet?
At this point, probably. I hate the price of the TW1. The TW2 is sold here under the Craftsman label (Sears) for $20 -- half of Park's asking price. But at least you'll be getting what you want.
 

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Save your money, you don't really need one to work on bikes.

You come with a built-in torque sensor and a brain that can reassess situations and adapt to complex operations, so learn and hone that basic skill of feeling the torque instead.

But, if you must, I would suggest that you wait until it's your birthday and drop hints like mad for one of these:



I've got the 713R size 6 model myself and very nice it is, except, I never needed to use a torque wrench to build, maintain or fix a bike be it made from aluminium or some exotic material(s).

Every now and then I take the 713R out of storage, have a little play with it, sync it with the laptop and then I put it away again. Probably perfect for assembling space shuttle components, but not really needed for bikes.

That having been said, once you acquire a torque wrench, take the trouble and learn how to use it properly; take note of it's limitations and apply it to only where it's really needed.
 

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92gli said:
How do you know ?
because thats what every torque wrench manufacturer lists for accuracy on clickers, 20-100% of the range. http://www.craftsman.com/shc/s/p_10...ipment&cName=Hand+Tools&keyword=torque+wrench

right in the description. not following this is how people strip out bolts and damage components. must use in the tools range.

recommending not using a torque wrench is about as bad advise as recommend a stahlwille anything for a bike. the majority of people dont turn enough bolts to know what a few foot pounds feels like, much less inch pounds.. and those people tend to not be asking about tools.
 

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From what I understand of torque instruments, the general 20-100% rule is related to capacity; if it's capacity is 250 in. lbs. then it should be good from 50 in lbs to capacity; there should be another spec for accuracy tolerance within that range (if you can find it stated), probably somewhere between 4-6% for a good clicker. That Stahlwille says it's good from 5-100% range within 1%...hate to even ask what one of those puppies cost.
 
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