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What Torque wrench and lube?

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My torque wrenches are too big for my bike so I am looking for one that will be specific for bikes. Something that will work, and accurate that will not break the bank. Also looking for lubricants, and I am confused there are so many.

Suggestions appreciated.

Thank you
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Check out Chain Reaction Cycles. They do a reasonably priced Lifeline torque wrench but the same one can be found elsewhere with different brand names.

Goes from 2-24Nm which is fine for nearly every job necessary on a bike. Don't know about pin point accuracy but way better than guessing. Mine has done a fine job and still is after 5 years or so.


No comment on lubes, I use cheap chainsaw oil on my chain, etc and a tub of basic automotive grease for everything else. I'm pretty sure you'll get plenty of recommendations for more 'bike specific' products. 馃槈
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This site gives an idea as to the torque ranges on many components, with cranksets being the high end, so you know what you'll need in terms of wrench(es).

Also, when I think about torque, it's mostly with carbon parts (although always a good idea regardless of material). Sometimes people don't realize that carbon paste, or fiber grip is a key element to keep things in range. (It suspends granules in a paste, helping with fastening while not over-torquing.)
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I used Muc Off and Tacx fiber grip...both excellent. My torque wrench is pricey (SKS) but it seems to be very accurate and stays accurate. I use that all the time on my bars and seat posts especially. I have 6 diff bikes and I mess with setup/angles/bars somewhat often, and it has been invaluable.
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I mostly don't need a full adjustable torque wrench for bike stuff. The majority of things I need a torque wrench for are about the same tightness, and I make use of a CDI torque key that's preset to 5Nm. That covers the vast majority of clamping interfaces.

Crank fixing bolts are the one thing that require much higher torque values, and I use an inexpensive beam-style torque wrench for that. I think I got mine at Ace for $25. plus a set of hex socket bits from somewhere or another (maybe Northern Tool?).

I don't get too fancy with lubricants for most things.

I keep a tub of basic grease around. I buy whatever axle grease from the auto parts store usually. Currently have Lucas Oil Red & Tacky or somesuch. Same stuff I use for the hub bearings on my camper. It stays put well and gets "general purpose" use on the bike. I pack it around cartridge bearings in the headset and bb, and use a thin film on other things (like the crank spindle, bolts that don't specifically call for a thread locker, etc). Clamping interfaces get a fiber grip. I've got a tube of the Tacx stuff, but I'm not such a big fan of it. I find the grit in it to be too irregular and angular and that leads to it actually causing creaks. I like fiber grip with a more consistent particle size. Lots of parts I've bought have come with the FSA stuff, which I like better.

I do keep around a tube of slick honey grease. That's a much lighter grease that specifically called for by some dropper post manufacturers and suspension manufacturers for servicing those items. I use it for those specific things. It's too light (and expensive) for the things I use other grease for.

Chain lube is where things get a little more complicated because your climate and riding conditions will be a major determinant of what lube types do better. Wet lubes work better in cold and wet conditions. They "work" in dry conditions, too, but they usually have a tendency to allow dirt to adhere, so they get royally messy pretty quickly. Dry lubes do better in dry conditions, because they are less likely to allow dirt to gunk up your chain. They "work" in wet conditions, sortof, but they wash off fast. I usually use a more intermediate lube, because I encounter the full range. Everything from immersion in deep creek crossings and persistent dampness to full dry, dusty conditions. And those might all occur on the same ride.

I don't get fancy with cleaners, either. Most of my "cleaning" is just a dry rag knocking or wiping stuff off. When I do an actual cleaning, it's mostly just Dawn soap, water, and a sponge/brush. I usually keep around a can of Clean Streak for spot use, but I don't use a ton of it.

I also keep around a spray bottle full of isopropyl alcohol. This is often actually called for by brake manufacturers for cleanup when doing brake service. Also works well for installing grips (esp slip-on types).
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My torque wrenches are too big for my bike so I am looking for one that will be specific for bikes. Something that will work, and accurate that will not break the bank. Also looking for lubricants, and I am confused there are so many.

Suggestions appreciated.

Thank you
If your torque wrench is not regularly calibrated, like yearly, it's not really something to go by.
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If your torque wrench is not regularly calibrated, like yearly, it's not really something to go by.
I've also heard that dropping a torque wrench can put it out of calibration as well.
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I've also heard that dropping a torque wrench can put it out of calibration as well.
We dealt with that a lot in aircraft maintenance. If we dropped a torque wrench, it went out of calibration and we had to send it to a shop for recalibration.
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