Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been doing something dumb I guess for the last month. And that is taking a modified Schwinn DSB down some relatively hard trails, Corner Canyon in Draper Vertigo and Rush, with my friend. Also other more flat style stuff too but that's fine with this bike I feel. I was never really that uncomfortable riding it downhill but I know its not sustainable for me or the bike. I've been okay so far only 2 crashes both minor and my fault, not the bikes. I've adjusted everything by hand and have put specialized Storm Controls on the rims for more control. Should I just stop here and leave it as a gravel bike and buy a Giant Talon or a Specialized Rockhopper soon or just keep riding this bike hard? I honestly feel like learning on this bike is fine but I know I don't have the experience to make a educated call on this I've run road bikes on root and rock filled flat trails before but downhill is a new animal to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
446 Posts
Your choices are a) ride it hard on trails it wasn't meant for until it breaks or b) buy something that was meant for the trails you enjoy riding. Is there a reason to stick with a)? if so, you haven't mentioned it.
 

·
since 4/10/2009
Joined
·
34,600 Posts
The more unsuited a bike is for the kind of riding you put it through, the more you're going to spend (money AND time) on maintenance and repair the farther you push the bike beyond what it's designed to do.

When it comes down to it, though, a low end mtb isn't going to be much of an improvement. The fork on a low end mtb might be a slight improvement, but not a whole lot of one until you spend a bit more. Increased tire width and tread pattern options on the mtb will be the most notable improvement at that price/quality range. Other parts might work a little better/be more durable than what you have, but it's not likely to be an earth shattering difference.

You've put a very narrow mud tire on your hybrid just to get some knobby tread. But that's not likely to be anywhere close to the best tire for your conditions, anyway.

If you've already decided that you are really into legit mountain biking, I think you'd be well served to spend on a mountain bike you can grow into.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,670 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
The biggest thing about getting a "real" Mountain bike vs one off the Walmart rack, is it's going to come in various sizes, and you can actually get the right one for you. Unless you just so happen to be within a couple of inches of the size of person the Walmart bike was designed around, it's too small or too big. I spent 10 years riding a Walmart bike that was too small for my 6'2" self (mongoose xr250) lucky it was all paved bike paths..
Recently upgraded to a specialized pitch (basically a rockhopper on 27.5" wheels) and the difference in comfort when I finally had a bike that fit me was amazing.
I don't at all regret going with a low end bike. It's gotten me out riding trails (not far from you, I'm on eagle mountain) and gaining skills. Eventually I'll upgrade, but for now, I really couldn't get much out of a better bike simply due to a lack of skill and fitness...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
237 Posts
Eventually I'll upgrade, but for now, I really couldn't get much out of a better bike simply due to a lack of skill and fitness...
A new bike may offer some motivation that may help you gain skill and increase your fitness. Also, newer geo and lighter bikes will be more playful and offer a better platform for progressing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the responses! I just currently cannot afford to buy another bike due to paying for college. But in the next few months I think I will be buying a used hardtail with the specs I want as people said a new bike in my budget isn’t going to be a bike to grow into. I don’t think my current bike frame is going to break anytime soon so until I buy another bike Ill just go with the flow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,895 Posts
What do you mean when you say "downhill." Look up videos of "downhill mountain biking." Actual downhill at any level requires body armor and a burly, purpose-built bike. If by downhill you mean what we all think it means, you ARE going to get hurt and break your bike. Real downhill is very hard on components and your body.

Not having money has it's advantages. You will be forced to learn to work on your own bike, learn how to fine quality used gear, and just ride more "base miles" to improve fitness.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top