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I just started getting into photography and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions as far as a hydration/camera pack. Something to carry more than one lens in and maybe a tripod, also something I can fall on and not worry too much about breaking my camera (If thats possible)
 

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Freedom Rider
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Pretty sweet, boxedrn! I wonder if anyone has any experience falling with or on a bag like this and the equipment being unharmed...
 

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saddlemeat
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I have never personally heard of a mountain biker breaking a camera by falling but I'm sure someone has. Just shove it in your Camelback. Get an VR (vibration reduction/image stabilization) lens and leave the tripod home. A seamstress friend sewed me a fleece bag out of an old fleece jacket sleeve to prevent rub marks.
 

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bsieb said:
I have never personally heard of a mountain biker breaking a camera by falling but I'm sure someone has. Just shove it in your Camelback. Get an VR (vibration reduction/image stabilization) lens and leave the tripod at home.
Amen and you don't need a VR lens. Mine typically stays at home.
 

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not really an mtbr member
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I found the best way to do it was to get a neoprene case for it and just shove it in the Camelbak. There's no bag that will protect it if you actually fall on it. Like they've said, that's unlikely though.

Oh, and trust me, you won't want more than a body and a lens. It gets really heavy really fast.
 

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theextremist04 said:
Oh, and trust me, you won't want more than a body and a lens. It gets really heavy really fast.
Sorry, can't trust you on that. I usually carry more than a body (heavy one too) and one lens. I usually have a couple of lenses and a couple of strobes. Sometimes I also add a video camera.

What you'll carry really depends upon what you are used to riding with and what you want to be able to capture.
 

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saddlemeat
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I have a little D5000 with a 35/1.8 lens that fits well in my Camelback HAWG. Much more than that and it's a photo shoot trip for me. One of my pro photog friends sometimes schleps his heavy camera and a lens or two but then it's usually a job, as it affects his biking enjoyment. If you are just getting into photography carry a prime lens of choice and develop that eye. :thumbsup:
 

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Ouchy The Clown said:
Sorry, can't trust you on that. I usually carry more than a body (heavy one too) and one lens. I usually have a couple of lenses and a couple of strobes. Sometimes I also add a video camera.

What you'll carry really depends upon what you are used to riding with and what you want to be able to capture.
I guess I also forgot to take into account that I only carried it on long rides- 4-5 hours. And 3L of water plus a 40D plus the 17-55 gets real heavy real fast.
 

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When off-road touring, the camera can take a caning at times, just as much as when photographing riders in harsh conditions.

The tripod I put on a beam rack, and it's held on with a bungee cord. The camera a DSLR, I have in a small Lowepro Topload padded pouch for slipping into my back pack. I put small lenses in Canon hard cases and a telephoto lens goes in a long thick Marino wool sock.








I've just recently acquired an Extrawheel Voyager for touring, it can now carry the gear on longer trips, including the tripod.




Following on from theextremist04's comments, it is good having what you need, especially the tripod, I also suggest not taking too much gear at once. Unless you have specific things that require a range of gear to be able to capture well. Riding as light as possible is best. I have found that the more gear I take, the less I tend to shoot. Being spoilt for choice creates too much thinking and not enough doing.

A shot from my last ride ... a Blakely's Red Gum in an open woodland, the Southern Tablelands, Oz. the same tree is in the shot with my bike.




Unless you are right at the top end with gear, not much else is adequately water-proofed or dust-proofed. In bad conditions a camera rain/dust sleeve which is only a few bucks can be useful and gives excellent protection. I wonder how many cameras got fine talc grit in them during the World Cup at Mount Stromlo ... thanks to the planet's most obnoxious chopper pilot, who repeatedly dusted the hapless spectators.




Warren.
 

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Fat guy on a bike
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I throw my SLR into a top loading padded bag, then put that into my Camelbak Alpine Runner which has plenty of room for it and whatever else you need.
 

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theextremist04 said:
I guess I also forgot to take into account that I only carried it on long rides- 4-5 hours. And 3L of water plus a 40D plus the 17-55 gets real heavy real fast.
Yes, again, what you'll carry really depends upon what you are used to riding with and what you want to be able to capture. That's a lighter pack for some folks.

The good thing is that for longer rides your pack gets lighter as the ride progresses.
 
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