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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Decisions, Decisions


I am looking for a bike to build for all mountain use, i had settled on the Mojo until the SC LT2 was mentioned.

Is the LT2 aimed more toward Cross Country riding? Can a Rockshox Lyric IS fork and Hammerschmidt crankset suit both of these bikes?

The bike will be for all sorts of riding from basic trails with the kids, to big and technical climbs and descents on all day rides, maybe up to 4' drops. Basically the bike will be ridden quite hard and fast most times.

I cant get hold of either bike to test ride as the only supplier wont let the bikes out for a decent test, cant do much when your in the carpark.

It needs to be; comfortable, strong, light, easy to maintain and most of all, good getting up the big hills (and back down).

Which would suit all mountain the best? Any info will be a great.
 

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www.derbyrims.com
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The two bikes are very similar in handling geometry. The LT has a slightly higher BB better for pedal clearance, but most riders prefer lower BB's for stability.

The biggest differences are rear suspension action, frame weight, and stiffness. The DWL version on the Mojo is more active than VPP while pedaling without squatting or bobbing while climbing, and far more active and high in traction than VPP while braking. The new version of VPP is much improved in pedaling over the first version, kickback is much reduced and more neutral, gone is the seated pedal stalling on rough terrain and standing jack-drop, but rear braking is still very easy to lockup. And the Mojo is about 1 pound lighter with the same components. The Mojo is far stiffer in rear end flex. Ibis customer service is second to none.

You might also look at the new Turner 5 Spot and Pivot Mach 5 for very similar variety in ride uses and benefits similar to the Mojo in DWL suspension action and low flex with the Pivot being exceptionally stiff and rough trail oriented.
 

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Founder: Dirty3hirties
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madaus said:
Is the LT2 aimed more toward Cross Country riding? Can a Rockshox Lyric IS fork and Hammerschmidt crankset suit both of these bikes?
Lyrik is fine.....the Mojo has a really short headtube and coupled with the integrated headset make for a very low front end even with the taller fork.

Hammerschmidt is incompatible with either bike.
 

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Well im not too firmiliar with the ibis but so far with my BLT2 i have notice that the bb is slightly low for a three ring set up. For comparison its about a half inch lower than a Nomad and i find myself caught up in verry rocky sections hitting the big ring, no biggie though.
I currently have a revelation 140 maxle great fork but i does make the front end slightly lower feeling mor "xc" ish but compaired to a 160 fox talas that was on there originally it feels more controlable at low to mid because of the quicker steering but i kinda liked the positioning of the 160 and probably will end up going back to a 160 fork this summer (lyrik solo air all the way).

When the rear end is set up 30% sag this bike is AMAZING it climbs like no other, needless to say at first i didnt have it set up right lol and i hated the bike but all is good now . The tubeset is pretty burly makes for stiff pedaler when cranking on it and the pivots are solid and quiet and i love that i can re-lube the lower pivot.

This seems like the perfect bike for me and plan on keeping it for quite some time. Like i said i may end up with a lyrik solo sometime soon other than that :thumbsup: its worh every cent. Good Luck and happy new year!
 

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I'm in the process of building the One with a totem (67 degrees). Doug in Moab loves his with a 160 fork (68 degrees). I'm replacing my Turner RFX and expect the build to come in at 34-35 lbs. Seen great reviews but can't give one yet personally. The two issues I know of are:
1) Front der looks tricky to set up. Not an issue for me - I run a single and not an issue for a Hammerschmidt.
2) Rear tire clearance. Canfields say a 2.5 Maxxis will fit but is close. I'm not sure if they are talking about the newer high volume tires or the smaller old ones. I'm gonna try to run a Big Betty 2.4 and am not sure if it will fit cause I think it might be bigger than my 2.5 High Roller.
Other than that, everything I've seen or heard has been excellent to awesome.

I chose the One with the Maxle rear 135 x 12 mm. The internals on the rear triangle are ribbed and will be stiffer and stronger than the dropout version. Can diggle is one pound heavier frame and 1 degree slacker in the headtube.
And it is a beautiful frame!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
axolotl said:
I'm in the process of building the One with a totem (67 degrees). Doug in Moab loves his with a 160 fork (68 degrees). I'm replacing my Turner RFX and expect the build to come in at 34-35 lbs. Seen great reviews but can't give one yet personally. The two issues I know of are:
1) Front der looks tricky to set up. Not an issue for me - I run a single and not an issue for a Hammerschmidt.
2) Rear tire clearance. Canfields say a 2.5 Maxxis will fit but is close. I'm not sure if they are talking about the newer high volume tires or the smaller old ones. I'm gonna try to run a Big Betty 2.4 and am not sure if it will fit cause I think it might be bigger than my 2.5 High Roller.
Other than that, everything I've seen or heard has been excellent to awesome.

I chose the One with the Maxle rear 135 x 12 mm. The internals on the rear triangle are ribbed and will be stiffer and stronger than the dropout version. Can diggle is one pound heavier frame and 1 degree slacker in the headtube.
And it is a beautiful frame!
Thanks for that, is yours for AM use? For a AM setup are the Totems overkill?

New to some of this, what does the 1 degree difference do with the forks, how will it change the ride, will it be harder to get uphill

Haven't made it to wheel and tyre choice yet, don't know how long it will take to get the frame with shop on Chrissy break.

Not sure about your comment - Maxel rear 135 x 12 mm
can you elaborate, is their a choice?

They are beautiful frames, chose this over a Mojo.
 

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It's all riding

madaus said:
Thanks for that, is yours for AM use? For a AM setup are the Totems overkill?
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I love to pedal and I ride anywhere from 2-6 hours. Call AM, Enduro, or whatever, its all riding. I know less than 160 is not enough. 180 too much? I'm gonna take my 35lb 6 inch bike and change it to a 35 lb 7 inch rig. If it's not heavier it can't be overkill cause the only time its too much is if you can't get it up
madaus said:
New to some of this, what does the 1 degree difference do with the forks, how will it change the ride, will it be harder to get uphill
Longer fork means slacker head tube angle. The One is speced with either a 160 or a 180 fork. Yes harder to climb and better at speed. I could have gone with the 2 step to set the fork for climbing and bump it up for the ride, but I just don't seem to use it when I've got it so I'm going with the solo air.

madaus said:
Not sure about your comment - Maxel rear 135 x 12 mm
can you elaborate, is their a choice?
Yes, you can get the One with either a regular dropout rear or a 135mm x 12mm through axle setup with a Maxle. It limits what hubs you can use. Hadley, Hope, Azonic, and soon Chris King. It is like the downhill bike version of the 150mm x 12mm hub but at the 135 width. Talk to Chris or Lance (Canfield) they are very helpful and can explain it better. Basically you get a stiffer (and a bit heavier) rear end with the Maxle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
derby said:
The One should be a great shuttle downhill and short ride stunt bike!
No good for long rides with a few hills then????

I do a couple of 6-7 hr rides a month, every day rides are on the old moto tracks behind my place (steep to get up and even steeper coming down in areas) track is riddled with dugouts, roots and rocks. Drilled myself into rocks coming down on my Trance, that is when i realized need something more suited to terrain and my riding.

Good for long rides and hills was what originally put me onto the Mojo but it would be ridden hard coming down.

Not really into the extremely big jumps and stunts nothing over 4-5' for me
 

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Ride and Smile
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The One does everything

derby said:
The One should be a great shuttle downhill and short ride stunt bike!
For Shuttles and Stunts, the Can Diggle, Can can, or Sauce would be much better. Heavier tubes, slacker angles. The One can be built up sub 30lb and is not designed as a stunt or shuttle bike. Quoting from Canfield's site:
The One is the light 7-8" travel Enduro frame that does it all.
Perfect climbing in both front chain-rings.
Deep enough travel to downhill anything you dare!

If you are concerned about climbing, put an adjustable fork on it and climb all day. I would be happy to shuttle with it, but I would also pedal it up anything. But to say that it is a shuttle or stunt bike is inaccurate. I wonder if people see a frame that has 7-8 inches of travel and just assume its only oriented for downhill or freeride?

I thought seriously about the Can Diggle for a while. But I'll probably never drop anything over 10 feet and I weigh 150lb and don't break frames.
 

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madaus said:
No good for long rides with a few hills then????

I do a couple of 6-7 hr rides a month, every day rides are on the old moto tracks behind my place (steep to get up and even steeper coming down in areas) track is riddled with dugouts, roots and rocks. Drilled myself into rocks coming down on my Trance, that is when i realized need something more suited to terrain and my riding.

Good for long rides and hills was what originally put me onto the Mojo but it would be ridden hard coming down.

Not really into the extremely big jumps and stunts nothing over 4-5' for me
Mojo's are very popular here in Park City. (see them in Moab too, but people who live there don't ride them) Two things (not counting carbon) would keep me from riding one. Steep head angle and <6" travel. My Turner 5 spot just seemed to come up short when pointed down hill. Same for the BlurLT. I don't have anything against either bike, they are just not for me. Here's a good quote from Lance about the One:

"It's really more about what you want to do with it. If you want light and split your time riding dh, xc and everything inbetween, thats the One. Doing mainly DH/ jumping and not worried about piching grams, thats the Can-Diggle (even though it's one of the lightest DH bikes on the market). If you want to run an 8" fork, you need a Can-Diggle. The One runs up to a 7" fork. Both these bikes will pedal and feel identical and can run the same build. You could put a three ring with a 6" fork on the Can-Diggle and you could chainguide a One and run DH tires. Versital is the name of the game here. Both these bikes are easy to ride, both up and down and are plenty strong to handle drops. Chris took the One off Mushroom rock, around 15 feet to good tranny. If your doing that everyday, I would recomend the Can-Diggle but the One can handle it, although thats not the intended purpose." found here
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
axolotl said:
Mojo's are very popular here in Park City. (see them in Moab too, but people who live there don't ride them) Two things (not counting carbon) would keep me from riding one. Steep head angle and <6" travel. My Turner 5 spot just seemed to come up short when pointed down hill. Same for the BlurLT. I don't have anything against either bike, they are just not for me. Here's a good quote from Lance about the One:

"It's really more about what you want to do with it. If you want light and split your time riding dh, xc and everything inbetween, thats the One. Doing mainly DH/ jumping and not worried about piching grams, thats the Can-Diggle (even though it's one of the lightest DH bikes on the market). If you want to run an 8" fork, you need a Can-Diggle. The One runs up to a 7" fork. Both these bikes will pedal and feel identical and can run the same build. You could put a three ring with a 6" fork on the Can-Diggle and you could chainguide a One and run DH tires. Versital is the name of the game here. Both these bikes are easy to ride, both up and down and are plenty strong to handle drops. Chris took the One off Mushroom rock, around 15 feet to good tranny. If your doing that everyday, I would recomend the Can-Diggle but the One can handle it, although thats not the intended purpose." found here
Cheers for the quote and link. The bike has to get me all over the place not used for any specific purpose, but wherever it takes me it will have to handle the terrain big or small.

Not sure if i would like to treat the Mojo like that.

The One just keeps getting better the more you look into it.
 
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