Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Terrain: Currently won't quit raining, so lots of mud on my trails. Singletrack with lots of climbing, roots, rock gardens etc.
Current Bike: Factory Rockhopper Disc 23" http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCBkModel.jsp?spid=32233
Current Tire: Factory Rockhopper Disc Tire Specialized Fast Trak LK Sport, 26x2.0", 60TPI, wire bead LowKnob, which I figure I should fix regardless. http://www.specialized.com/bc/SBCEqProduct.jsp?spid=35740
Issues I'm having: Massive slipping issues. I realize this is due to my outlandishly high PSI, (80) but I feel that's marginally necessary to support my currently 285 riding weight.

Should I try tubeless and a lower PSI? I'm worried my weight could risk some rim damage, which i'm not entirely cool with as I"m sure you could imagine.

Or are there any other tires out there that I should be looking to buy today?

much thanks ahead of time,
jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Go tubeless...
Possibly Continental Mountain King UST in a 2.4 and lower the pressure. Regardless of the tire you choose, I'd go UST, tubeless and lower the pressure!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
am i risking any kind of serious rim damage in dropping my pressure though? I realize i don't have an incredible wheelset, but i'm not a fan of buying things i don't have to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,103 Posts
i know people in your weight range that run tubeless at less than half of your current psi. their gear seems to be holding up fine in the very rocky and unforgiving SW. 80 psi is amazingly high for a bike tire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
I agree. I use non-UST tires tubeless, but I would advise against that for you, given your weight. A UST tire will be considerably more sturdy with heavy duty side walls. I don't know if your rims are tubeless ready, or if you would have to use Stan's conversion. I'd take the bike to your LBS and at least have them take a look at it to see if they think it's feasible. That way, you're not out the money if it wont work. I'm amazed the tire hasn't failed at 80 PSI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
well they say on them that they alow up to 80. i figured with a dude my size that'd be necessary to keep them from pinching out and tearing up my rim. how would one know if their rim is "tubeless ready?" it's a specialized factory rim, and i'm quite sure they wouldn't be hip to the idea of someone modifying them like so.

if i were to do this "ghetto tubeless" that seems to be all the rage, would it hold up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Nothing beats having someone experienced with this stuff looking at it. If you have an LBS that you think is good, I'd go talk to them about the options. Stan's can be used with almost any rim.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,762 Posts
The stock rims....

on your Rockhopper are not "tubeless ready" and would have to be converted using something like a Stans kit or similar product.

Before you get nuts about tires, DROP YOUR PRESSURE! 80 psi is WAY too high for off road. I'm not a little guy and tip the scales at 230lbs. I ride agressive XC/Trail and haven't run a tire higher than 35psi in many years. At your weight I'd say somewhere between 40 and 45 psi would be sufficient to prevent pinch flat problems and you'd be very unlikely to ding your rims. The key is to experiment with pressures. Start at say 50 psi and the drop 3 to 5 psi at a time until you do actually pinch flat or until you get the best performance out of the tire. The idea is to get the tire soft enough so that it will conform a bit to obsticals as you roll over them, rather than bounce over then like a brick, yet not compress enough to cause a pinch flat or ding the rim. Currently that's where you are loosing traction, the tire has to bounce over roots etc. and it slips as it does so. At 80 psi that tire is every bit as hard and unyeiding as the rocks and roots it's running into.

From there, once you've found an ideal pressure, if the performance of the tire still isn't up to what you want, start trying other tires. But you may well be pleasantly surprised at what shaving 30psi or so off the top of what you are currently running will do for both traction and handling.

Good Dirt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
DJ - I'm not far behind in weight and I'm only running my stock tires at 40 psi. No dings, no pinch flats...yet.

Squash has it right. You don't want the tire to be as hard as the obstacles you are riding over. It's a lot like 4-Wheelin. You wouldn't want to go wheelin with street tire pressure. Dropping the psi causes the tire to squish a bit, allowing a larger contact patch and more of the tires thread to grip obstacles.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top