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I notice my bike has inner tubes that are nice and thicker on outside and thin on inside. They seem higher quality then tubes from Walmart. Are better tubes worth it?

Also any brand of patches that seal really good?
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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I've used the Park patches and the ones from PricePoint (I suspect the same manufacturer), and they both work great so long as you sand and cure properly. I haven't used the peel-and-stick patches, though.

As for tubes, I bought several lightweight (thin) ones once and won't do so again. YMMV, of course. These days, I just buy a set of five standard MTB tubes (~$10 total) from PricePoint when the need arises.
 

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don't get the peel and sick patches (gluess less) as they won't work that great. Any one that you have to sand and glue should be fine.

You can get lighter (thinner) tubes if you want but when I used to run them I would get flats about 3 times than if I ran regular tubes. And the latex tubes I tried lasted me one ride before I tossed them in the trash. If your trying to save weight then I would look into the lighter tubes or even tubless. If weight isn't your concern then just get the regular tubes and it will be fine. If you get alot of flats from thorns then you can also look into slime tubes.
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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I run with liners. They add weight but the trails I ride are rough so the added protection is nice.

Supposedly, liners are much lighter than slime. I've never directly compared the two, however. Liners won't prevent snakebites and they don't do much for your sidewalls, but neither will slime.
 

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Never ride without my Park Patches

I've had no issues with the peel in stick Park patches for an emergency patch. In order to adhere properly, you still need to sand the tube before applying the patch. I find that they don't hold up to long term use as well as the old school vulcanizing fluid patch kits, but they will get you through your ride and many, many more.

The Park vulcanizing fluid patches hold up forever, but they are more of a PITA to deal with on the trail and once you open the little fluid bottle, it's only a matter of time before the fluid bottle dries hard, rendering your patch kit useless. Hopefully you don't discover this when you're out of tubes and 20 miles from your car.

Personally I will never go back to the vulcanizing fluid kits.
 

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I've been using Bontrager tubes and they're what I trust. Works great for me. And I've been using these patches:
http://www.dealextreme.com/p/bicycle-tire-tube-repairing-patches-with-glue-26263

3/4 times I've noticed the hole in my tube at home so I have never used the little tube of glue to patch kit comes with. But the patches work great, I was also able to tear in my tire, not a sidewall tear.
 

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brent878 said:
don't get the peel and sick patches (gluess less) as they won't work that great. Any one that you have to sand and glue should be fine.
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I've only tried the Park glueless patches. It got me out of the woods, but went flat a couple of days later so I replaced it with a normal patch. I'll never use the glueless again because it was extremely difficult to remove the self stick residue from the tube.
 

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R.I.P. DogFriend
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Mr. Tuffy and similar liners will help prevent flats, but they are heavy and can be a little bit of extra work to install properly. I ran them many years ago for a while back in the 90's. I had a nail go through my tire that moved the tire liner aside and the nail actually came right up through the rim itself :eekster:

I am currently running tubeless with a homebrewed sealant on Stans NoTubes rims. Now, I don't even carry a spare tube, patches or a pump unless I am going on a longer ride.
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The patch kit below will work fine.

A couple of additional tips:

The patches come with the foil on the bottom and a thin plastic layer on top. Peel the foil off the bottom and leave the clear plastic layer on the patch when you apply it. The thin clear plastic layer keeps the patch from sticking to the inside of the tire.

Also, once you open the glue and puncture the tinmmetal to let the glue out, the whole tube tends to dry out, many times before you use it a second time. If you put a little teflon tape on the threads of the glue tube where the cap attaches, it sometimes keeps it from drying out.
 

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Braille Riding Instructor
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Just enough to scuff the surface of the tube where the patch will be go. You want to scuff and vulcanize an area slightly larger than the patch.

Most patch kits cost about $2 and usually come with 5-6 patches. Tubes at your LBS run anywhere from $5-$9, although the cheap ones on PricePoint are $2 if you buy five at once. Still, the patches are a great way to save money.

I ride with a spare tube and a patch kit in my saddle bag. The spare tube is for flats. The patch kit for "Murphy's Law" moments--I don't usually patch a leaky tube until after the ride.
 

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Picture Unrelated
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I only use the sticker-type patches, never have to worry about dry glue and they've never not worked for me. Just sand and make sure the surface is clean.

You can also consider tubeless with sealant. Do a search for "ghetto tubeless" and you should find some instructions and opinions. With the tubeless setup you eliminate the tube and fill your tire with a much better sealant than Slime for example Stan's. Slime sealant is just shy of completely useless, Stan's and others have particles suspended in them to assist sealing of punctures where Slime is just a viscous liquid.
 

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my sticker type patches didn't come with sand paper. Maybe that's why they didn't work for me. It was getting so bad that I would patch something, seat the bead, put 30 pounds of air in it then sit on the bike and hear all the air rush out as the patch came un done. I never had a problem with the glue type so I switched back.
 

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Brambled said:
I notice my bike has inner tubes that are nice and thicker on outside and thin on inside. They seem higher quality then tubes from Walmart. Are better tubes worth it?

Also any brand of patches that seal really good?
Like some of the other posters here, I tried glue-less a couple of times, and they just did not hold up over the long term. I carry an extra tube, and just switch out on the trail if I need to and patch the tube when I get home, the slight extra time to use the regular patches is not really an issue. As far as which brand, I've tried park, and too many generic brands to count, and they all seem to work fine.

I like to use the lightest tubes I can get away with, and I have never seen these kind for sale at a dept store. Depends on how/where you ride, though. I run extra-light tubes and very rarely flat. However, someone with different riding style, smaller tires, or in a different area might be plagued with flats if they tried this.
 

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I like Schraeder patches. Not sure, if they are available everywhere, though. Anyway, good patches are soft, small and round. Besides, they are never sold in patch kits, separately only.
Soft patches follow the shape of tube better and less tend to peel off upon gluing. Patches tend to peel off on corners, even rounded, it is why round ones hold on better. Also, the smaller the perimeter, the better.
Sand paper is not a good idea, kind of a small grinder is better (they come in kits, but you may use them long after the kit is all used up). Don't forget to clean them from time to time to keep the spikes sharp.
I carry a small bottle of acetone ( pure benzine will do as well, even 95% alcohol will) and a piece of cloth to clean the rubber before patching. If you have sealant in your tubes, it is necessary, if you don't - optional, but still recommended.
Edit: contrary to what I just said, there is a use for large thick rectangular patches. I carry 2-3 to patch the tire from inside in case it is cut.
 
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