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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been on now for a couple of months or so. Here's what I've learned...

I have to develop my own style of riding and put together my own outfit.

I love the speed of road biking, but not the weakness of the bikes or their limits.

I've ridden one trail and it was a nice experience, but not me.

I cannot just "ride" in a straight line. I have to jump things, I have to go through
or over something, not around it and if I have to go around it I have to do it in
grand style.

So, I'm going to have to design a bike just for what I want to do.
I can't exactly say it'll be Urban Assault anymore, but most likely a composite
of Urban Assault and what we used to call "FreeStyling" in BMX when I was younger.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Bikes I like...

Downhillers;
I just love the way they look. I don't know how they'd do on pavement,
but I'm going to find out.


Low Profile Hardtails;
This is what I will probably do with my current bike (GF Opie).
Fat pavement heavy duty tires (Maxxix Hookworms), fat fork (most likely a Fox or a Marchozzi), stiff light metal crankset (Race Face or Shimano) and a straight handlebar
with an extended low profile stem. I think I'll build this with budget parts (solid brand
name company's entry level products or maybe a step up from their entry level products).

If I fall in love with my Op, I might turn this into an overinvested, "could've bought a new mid-level bike for the same money" custom toy.

I'm wondering if there is any reason why I shouldn't take this frame and make it the
foundation of a nice street bike build with premium parts.

Full Suspension Beasts:
A custom Knolly build up when I've learned enough about MTBing and my own needs.
That is the one I dream about.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Riding style:
Fast runs on trails. Not too crazy about the technical stuff...anytime I have to slow down
to almost a complete stop, I lose interest! :D

I love going as fast as I can with my hair on fire.

I love going through obstacle courses like people, buses, street lamps, mailboxes,
trash cans, etc...and "not" having to use my brakes unless it's a tactic to get around
something somehow and just to put me in a position for a power burst of speed
peddaling hard and fast to get myself back up to how was before I had to break.
I love that, I love fighting the surroundings making it yield to me not me to it.

I love bunnyhopping or straight jumping over things. Leaving the ground is very
gratifying for me. 1', 2', 3', whatever. Drops, stairs, fine.

I'm not into aesthetic tricking. I like tricking for a purpose...a jump to get through
a construction site, a side bunnyhop to get myself up onto a curb when a car
decides to cut me off on it's passenger side, whatever it takes to "not" come
to a complete stop...that seems to be the goal for me.

Even when I have to come to a light, I try to keep my foot on both pedals,
pedalling backwards if I have to as long as I can while I balance the bike and
trying to keep myself from stopping readying myself for the lunge forward
once I have the green.

To sum it up, speed, continuity and riding until I cannot ride anymore
(which I usually top out at 2-3 hours) as my halfway point. I ride until exhaustion,
stop, grab a bite, drink, then ride again for at least an equal amount of time.

Of course, breaking the monotony with a jump here and there when I have to
slow down.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Components matter most.

That I would say is the most important thing I've learned here.

Decent frames are relatively cheap, but components make or break the biking experience.

Can't ride without a helmet and hydration is a must.

Padded shorts, a must.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
LOL!

Yeah, but it looks sooooo frickin' cool!

:D

Seriously though, I just came back from a little ride.

Something else I learned (that I forgot to mention).
A bike can kill you.

How cheap is cheap if your brakes fail at 20 MPH?
How cheap is cheap if your fork collapses out of nowhere?
How cheap is cheap if your handlebars come loose causing you to lose control?

I'm happy with my little "entry-level" bike.
It's world's better than a "cheap" bike.
I feel like it deserves everything "better" (upgrades, crank, fork, etc...).
But it feels relatively solid for now.

It does what I want it to do and I'm gaining more and more confidence with every jump.

There should be a warning thread here for all the beginners who have absolutely no
biking experience whatsoever.

I was spoiled in my youth in that I had access to some great BMX bikes and I learned
quickly the benefits of having a machine that would'nt break and flip you when you landed.
A quality bike boosts your confidence and makes you a better rider as you push yourself
and your skills progres.

Riding a cheap bike is like driving a race car with only one lug on it.
Sooner or later, it's going to fall apart and crush you.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
nathan abernathy said:
what kind of troll thread is this?
What kind of troll "comment" was that? :D

TROLL::
An Internet troll, or simply troll in Internet slang, is someone who posts controversial and usually irrelevant or off-topic messages in an online community, such as an online discussion forum or chat room, with the intention of baiting other users into an emotional response or to generally disrupt normal on-topic discussion.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_troll
 

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Probably drunk right now
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6,753 Posts
Really?

2ndgen said:
Well, usually when someone suggests something to me,
I expect that they are an expert and are speaking from experience.
So common sense dictates that I asked the person who suggested it in the first place.

:D
My common sense and experience tells me that there are lots of people who dispense advice who aren't experts.

So again, Google is your friend. And experience will tell you that a DH bike is for downhilling and a trials bike is better suited for what you're looking for.
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
TLL said:
For all you urban needs, you should be on something like an Eastern26 or some other dirt jumping kind of thing.
Hey TLL,

Nice, but I also use the bike for distance riding (3-4+ hours at a time).

I'm actually going to have to build a bike from scratch. I'm going to practice with my Opie
(haven't built a custom bike in 2 1/2 decades), but then I'll go all-out later on in the year.

Something with road bike speed and mountain bike strength & ability.

Like I said, an S.U.B. (Sport Utility Bike).

:)
 

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OnTheTrailAgain
Joined
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2,165 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ken in KC said:
My common sense and experience tells me that there are lots of people who dispense advice who aren't experts.

So again, Google is your friend. And experience will tell you that a DH bike is for downhilling and a trials bike is better suited for what you're looking for.
I'm a believer in customization.

A trials bike is good for just tricking, but I wouldn't be able to ride it across 3 or 4 counties in a single run.

I'd love to build up a DH bike tailored for street riding. I rode a buddy's and I saw possibilities with it for the type of riding I do. It's a beast. The most important thing for street riding would be for it to be able to handle landing on concrete. I'm pretty sure it could be built to handle that. It just takes (no pun intended :D ) trial and error.

Damn would it be cool to have a monster DH bike with those full forks tailored for flying throught NYC streets!

I'm sure you might have seen this video already, but imagine riding like this with the capability to jump instead of having to go around certain obstacles...


The "fun" starts at 01:13!
 

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Registered
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244 Posts
Never really looked at an Eastern before now...

That thing is sweet!
 

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2ndgen said:
Hey TLL,

Nice, but I also use the bike for distance riding (3-4+ hours at a time).
Sounds like you got yourself a plan. :thumbsup:

oohsh_t said:
Never really looked at an Eastern before now...

That thing is sweet!
And cheap. I'm going to pick one up and use it to reacquaint myself with jumping. If I like it I'll build up something more burly.
 
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