Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,505 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rather than hijack the Behemoth thread this probably deserves its own, one more time...

nightfire said:
What prompts me to post is a realisation that has dawned on me in recent times.

In the last 2 years we have seen a trickle of new 29 components apear, very few of these get any critical analysis because the growing few are happy that at least someone is making something.

I belive that this is blinding us to the reality that 29ers although a little bigger are still not big.

The only thing that will do this is a focus on what they actually make better and not just a "it's 29" therfore good" mentality.

P::..

discuss
The fact that 29"ers use a current standard 622mm bead diameter is the only reason they now are running a somewhat belated parallel path with the Mtn. Bikes that evolved in the early 80's from the 26 x 1.25 tire that Mr. Goodyear invented in 1936. While they may be a little bigger, going bigger yet will mean alot of retooling and rethinking that may happen at some point, but is not likely to occur anytime soon.

Sure there seems to be a frenzy to come up with new products to fuel the 29" fire. Look back at the evolution of it's 26" cousin to see the logic there.

Bikes like the Behemoth, which has occured a short 6 years after the introduction of the 29" genre, are not going to please everybody, just like riding a SS is not for everyone either. However because of the groundwork layed by the 26"er it is all that much easier to want something like it because you see it on the other side of the fence and wonder, why not? Also many of the converts here grew up getting longer travel suspensions and larger tires handed to them every year by the industry so why should the 29"ers be any different?

In the meantime there will be any number of folks here and abroad voicing their opinions that will never completely mesh I am afraid. However, please remember, a bike is pretty much a bike world round if it has two wheels and air in the tires/tyres No matter what it weighs, or what the geometry is or what the diameter of the wheels are.;)
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
Tennis balls exist that don't have 0 psi in them, the sheel takes care of holding the shape. No varience in bouce at different temperatures, no problem if you manage to puncture it. I also have tennisballs filled with powder rather than high-psi air.

Ideal wheelsize in a fluent thing, I feel it's different for every ride and rider. However, if you'd be able to analyse all adult's MTB needs, and add them all up, I'm pretty sure more people will be tter off with 29" than with 26". Intriguingly, such research if doable and reliable would also give quite a bit of rides and riders where the optimum reaches towards 33" or even more.
BIG wheels will asks for new standards to go along with them, even for 29" already I don't see why we shouldn't go to wider hubs spacings. The longe chainstays that are gaining in acceptance make that much easier to live with than with as-short-as-possible 26" rear ends. Somewhere in time a roadie invented the word Q-factor, and the idea that narrower is better, and ever since any that would bring pedals out stumbles on resistance for experienced riders that know all about Q-factors.
Nightfire and myself have each been looking at building the first-ever 36" wheeled MB, cruisers already exist. For riders ~6'3" and up, those should be fairly well ridable, but especially just being one tire on the market for them, more or less a car technology tire as far as I can tell, the thing is going to way 40lbs and up, rigid. Guys like that huge asian NBA pro would just throw let over such a bike, and do trials stunts on it though, 29"er are just ridiculously small for them.

someone once brought up the relationship between body height and wheelsize, because he managed to get his 52" son on an XS 26" bike. The lightweight kid handled the relateively heavy bike with great easy, and was plain faster on it than on his previous 24" bike. Sure it was a tight fit, but once it all fits, it works. I'm 6'4", rules of proportion would say that 38" could fit me like the 26" wheels fit the 8yo kid. I wouldn't be able to keep up with the small kid on his neighbourhood trails, but then, those were made by kids, not adults. On adult trails, with a bit of space between the trees and turn larger enough for a pig to take as reasonable speed, 36" might really not suck.

While with such huge wheels I could ride quite a bit, it would probably be overkill. Much rougher trails can be explored and made. Rocks that 26" DH wheels get stuck between, the 36" could roll over. Then again, a ditch that a 26" bike smoothly rolls through, the 36"er would endo stuck into.

Bigger will not alwyas be better, those acrican studs on their homemade bike (I want one) , obviously designed theirs for a low COG for carrying big loads. Similar trucks alo have small wheels. And in their case, finding a log to cut wheels out of gets harder everyday, not many 29" trees standing up nowadays :-(

discuss!
 

·
climb
Joined
·
2,293 Posts
Those are pretty cool, no pinch flats ever!!! I wonder if they can be made the same weight as conventional wheels/tires?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
361 Posts
There is no ultimate wheel diameter!

Their is no ultimate wheel diameter! I would somewhat agree with statement of ergonomics, wheelsize proportional to rider height, but that is not a steadfast rule. The point is... There are many criteria to consider when choosing a wheelsize. Rider Height, Rider Ability (Strength, Fitness, Skill), Terrain, Availability of Components, etc... Those are just a few, but I'm sure many more could be named. However, there is a larger question to be answered here.

Most of us have more than one bike, why? There are several reasons, but we justify that new bike to fit a niche of riding that our current bike does not fulfill. Obviously, most everyone here is interested in the progression of the 29" bike into the mainstream. We would like to see more parts available, more frames, rims, tires, and other parts to follow suit and better fit its capabilities. We would like it not to be seen as a niche, but a viable option for all riders. There is a natural human tendency to seek one perfect solution, there are only a small number of people who understand that there is not one perfect solution. I don't just mean in this forum. I mean on this planet there are only a small number of people who understand that there is not one perfect solution.

The point is, diversity and education are key. I don't look down on other riders who love riding their 26" bikes. They enjoy a greater diversity of frames and componentry to out fit their ride. When someone asks me how I like my 29er, wether it be a Karate Monkey or the Dos Niner, I don't tell them 29ers are for everyone. I offer to let them take it for a spin. I tell them they ought to demo one when they have a chance. I tell them, it makes sense for larger riders for a lot of reasons, but I have several smaller friends who love riding them as well. I educate them in an objective manner, telling them the pros and cons offering them an opportunity to form an opinion for themselves. I tell them I love it, but they should ride one before forming their own opinion.

I recently saw a thread here telling riders to yell "29er" as they passed other riders. I ask; Is another rider on a 26" bike inherently evil simply because they have chosen smaller wheels for their own use? Wether it be through lack of education or an educated decision, this person is not evil. It goes without saying that all of us here were angered by R.C.'s rant about 29ers being on their way out. Why? I'll tell you why. We were all angered that R.C. did not recognize that the 29er had its place among the diverse stable of bikes we have in this industry to choose from. He did not recognize and accept diversity when he saw it.

There is no ultimate wheel diameter... There are good wheel diameters for different riders and different conditions, there are perceptions, but there is no ultimate wheel diameter!

That's My Rant. Some of you will agree, some of you won't
 

·
Recovering couch patato
Joined
·
14,019 Posts
Dragster car wheels do just that! You have an excellent idea there, at slow speed small wheels often are more convenient, and the other way around for high speeds. To once again repeat the thrase, and change it a bit : "if only NASA and Aliens were into bikes...".

JMKM, I like your preaching style, that's the way to do it. Unfortuately my bikes fits very few riders openminded to even give it a try, so I've only ridden around under a dozen riders over the past years. Most of them were impressed though. Around half converted soon after, others are working on the budget, or just resisting the idea without really knowing why, main reason probably I came up with it first.
I hope to one day own a much smaller 29"er than I would ride, say 18", so I could give it to interested riders to demo. Heck, my girlfriend would probably get a lot out of it for her racing, she's just without a bike budget. Furtunately I got her the best 26" bike her money could buy, and she liked it from the get go, her first MTB.

It's too bad that it's so incredibly hard to "just" make, say, a 32" rim and tire, if only just to see how it would ride. How awkward (sp?) it would be, and if it would roll noticiably better still.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top